Joy of Cooking: 2019 Edition Fully Revised and Updated

Joy of Cooking: 2019 Edition Fully Revised and Updated

Joy of Cooking: 2019 Edition Fully Revised and Updated

Joy of Cooking: 2019 Edition Fully Revised and Updated

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Overview

“Generation after generation, Joy has been a warm, encouraging presence in American kitchens, teaching us to cook with grace and humor. This luminous new edition continues on that important tradition while seamlessly weaving in modern touches, making it all the more indispensable for generations to come.” —Samin Nosrat, author of Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat

“Cooking shouldn’t just be about making a delicious dish—owning the process and enjoying the experience ought to be just as important as the meal itself. The new Joy of Cooking is a reminder that nothing can compare to gathering around the table for a home cooked meal with the people who matter most.” —Joanna Gaines, author of Magnolia Table

In the nearly ninety years since Irma S. Rombauer self-published the first three thousand copies of Joy of Cooking in 1931, it has become the kitchen bible, with more than 20 million copies in print. This new edition of Joy has been thoroughly revised and expanded by Irma’s great-grandson John Becker and his wife, Megan Scott.

John and Megan developed more than six hundred new recipes for this edition, tested and tweaked thousands of classic recipes, and updated every section of every chapter to reflect the latest ingredients and techniques available to today’s home cooks. Their strategy for revising this edition was the same one Irma and Marion employed: Vet, research, and improve Joy’s coverage of legacy recipes while introducing new dishes, modern cooking techniques, and comprehensive information on ingredients now available at farmers’ markets and grocery stores.

You will find tried-and-true favorites like Banana Bread Cockaigne, Chocolate Chip Cookies, and Southern Corn Bread—all retested and faithfully improved—as well as new favorites like Chana Masala, Beef Rendang, Megan’s Seeded Olive Oil Granola, and Smoked Pork Shoulder. In addition to a thoroughly modernized vegetable chapter, there are many more vegan and vegetarian recipes, including Caramelized Tamarind Tempeh, Crispy Pan-Fried Tofu, Spicy Chickpea Soup, and Roasted Mushroom Burgers. Joy’s baking chapters now include gram weights for accuracy, along with a refreshed lineup of baked goods like Cannelés de Bordeaux, Rustic No-Knead Sourdough, Ciabatta, Chocolate-Walnut Babka, and Chicago-Style Deep-Dish Pizza, as well as gluten-free recipes for pizza dough and yeast breads.

A new chapter on streamlined cooking explains how to economize time, money, and ingredients and avoid waste. You will learn how to use a diverse array of ingredients, from amaranth to za’atar. New techniques include low-temperature and sous vide cooking, fermentation, and cooking with both traditional and electric pressure cookers. Barbecuing, smoking, and other outdoor cooking methods are covered in even greater detail.

This new edition of Joy is the perfect combination of classic recipes, new dishes, and indispensable reference information for today’s home cooks. Whether it is the only cookbook on your shelf or one of many, Joy is and has been the essential and trusted guide for home cooks for almost a century. This new edition continues that legacy.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781501169717
Publisher: Scribner
Publication date: 11/12/2019
Pages: 1200
Sales rank: 7,142
Product dimensions: 8.30(w) x 9.10(h) x 2.50(d)

About the Author

Irma Rombauer self-published the first Joy of Cooking in 1931. In 1936, the first commercial edition was published by Bobbs-Merrill. Marion Rombauer Becker, Irma’s daughter, helped revise and update each subsequent edition until 1951. The 1963 edition was the first after Irma’s death and was completely Marion’s. Her son, Ethan Becker, helped Marion revise the 1975 edition, and then oversaw the 1997 and 75th Anniversary editions. Ethan’s son, John Becker and his wife, Megan Scott are the first of the family to be solely responsible for testing, revising, and updating the book since 1975, ensuring the latest edition is given the same love and attention to detail that made this culinary resource an American classic.

Ethan Becker is the son of Marion Rombauer Becker and the grandson of Irma S. Rombauer, the original author of The Joy of Cooking. He attended Le Cordon Bleu in Paris, but learned how to cook from his mom. An outdoors-man, he is a master of the grill and at cooking game. His outdoor gear and survival and combat knives are sold internationally under the brand Becker Knife and Tool. Ethan and his wife, Susan, a writer, editor, and artist, live in East Tennessee at their home, Half Moon Ridge. His website is TheJoyKitchen.com.

John Becker, great-grandson of Irma Rombauer, grew up surrounded by the natural splendor of the Pacific Northwest. Spending his childhood between Portland, Oregon and the Becker family home in Cincinnati, John learned to appreciate a range of approaches to cooking. Influenced by his father Ethan’s improvisational style, and his mother’s love of international foods and spices, John has an insatiable curiosity when it comes to food and cooking. After earning an English degree, he helped publish seventeen collections of literary essays before dedicating himself to the family business and updating Joy for a new generation. John currently lives in Portland, Oregon with his wife, Megan.


Megan Scott started worked for the Joy of Cooking in 2010, when she and John Becker met and immediately bonded over a shared love of blue cheese. Megan’s culinary education began in North Carolina, where she learned to cook from a long line of matriarchs. She grew up in a farming family, shucking corn and snapping green beans as far back as she can remember. She has been a cheesemaker’s apprentice, a baker, and an assistant pastry chef, and in addition to her work for Joy she is the culinary director for a marketing agency that specializes in food. Megan lives in Portland, Oregon, with her husband John and their two cats, Loki and Kishu.

Read an Excerpt

This recipe can be found in Joy Of Cooking's Stuffing chapter.

BASIC BREAD STUFFING
8 to 10 cups

This and the bread stuffing recipes that follow yield enough to stuff a 14- to 17-pound turkey. Many of the variations yield enough for an additional small casserole of stuffing. To stuff an oven roaster or 6 to 8 rock Cornish hens, halve the recipes. For a larger turkey, increase all the ingredients by half. The optional egg makes the stuffing firm. If you prefer the bread to be moist, skip the toasting step.

Position a rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Toast until golden brown:

1 pound sliced firm white sandwich, French, or Italian bread, including crusts, cut into 1/2-inch cubes, or 10 cups lightly packed bread cubes

Turn into a large bowl. Heat in a large skillet over medium-high heat until the foam subsides:

4 to 8 tablespoons (1/2 to 1 stick) unsalted butter

Add and cook, stirring, until tender, about 5 minutes:

2 cups chopped onions 1 cup finely chopped celery

Remove from the heat and stir in:

1/4 to 1/2 cup minced fresh parsley
1 teaspoon dried sage, or 1 tablespoon minced fresh
1 teaspoon dried thyme, or 1 tablespoon minced fresh
I teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated or ground nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
Stir into the bread cubes and toss until well combined. Depending on how much butter you started with and how firm you want the stuffing, stir in, a little at a time, until the stuffing is lightly moist but not packed together:
1/3 to 1 cup chicken stock 1 to 2 large eggs, well beaten (optional)

Adjust the seasonings. To use as a stuffing, reheat just before spooning it into the bird(s). Or moisten with additional:

Stock and/or egg
and turn into a large, shallow buttered baking dish. Bake in a 350°F oven until the top has formed a crust and the stuffing is heated through, 25 to 40 minutes.

This information can be found in the Joy Of Cooking's Poultry chapter.

RULES FOR STUFFING BIRDS

1. Always stuff the bird just before roasting2. Have the stuffing hot and pack it loosely in the body and neck cavities. The stuffing must reach a temperature of 160°F during roasting to ensure that any possible pathogens are killed. If it is cold and packed tightly into the bird, it will not heat to this point until long after the bird is cooked through.

3. You must close the cavities in order to keep the stuffing in place. The quickest and most efficient way to do this is by sewingthe cavities shut with a trussing needle and twine. If you do not own a trussing needle, secure the body cavity with small skewers and lacing (kits for this purpose are sold at kitchen shops) and close the neck cavity with toothpicks.

4. When the bird has cooked through, take the temperature of the stuffing by plunging the stem of the thermometer deep into the body cavity. If the stuffing has not yet reached 160°F, simply take the bird out of the oven, scoop the stuffing into a buttered casserole, and bake it in the hot oven while the bird stands before carving.

5. Finally, always take all the stuffing out of the cooked bird as soon as you begin to carve. Stuffing left inside a large turkey may remain warm for several hours, even if the bird is refrigerated, providing a perfect environment for bacterial growth.

Copyright © 1997 by Simon & Schuster Inc., The Joy of CookingTrust and the MRB Revocable Trust

Table of Contents

Diet, Lifestyle & Health ..... 1
Entertaining ..... 8
Menus ..... 17
Coffee, Tea & Hot Chocolate ..... 24
Stocks & Sauces ..... 35
Condiments, Marinades & Dry Rubs ..... 60
Soups ..... 91
Eggs ..... 121
Hors D'oeuvre ..... 143
Little Dishes ..... 158
Sandwiches, Burritos & Pizzas ..... 181
Salads ..... 200
Salad Dressings ..... 234
Grains ..... 243
Beans & Tofu ..... 270
Pasta, Dumplings & Noodles ..... 295
Vegetables ..... 332
Fruits ..... 439
Stuffing ..... 481
Shellfish ..... 488
Fish ..... 527
Poultry ..... 567
Game ..... 625
Meat ..... 637
Yeast Breads ..... 735
Quick Breads ..... 771
Pancakes, Waffles, French Toast & Doughnuts ..... 793
Cookies ..... 812
Candy ..... 845
Pies & Tarts ..... 856
American Fruit Desserts ..... 894
Puff Pastry, Strudel & Danish Pastries ..... 906
Cakes, Tortes & Cupcakes ..... 923
Frostings, Fillings & Glazes ..... 987
Custards, Puddings, Mousses & Dessert Souffles ..... 1013
Dessert Sauces ..... 1040
Cooking Methods ..... 1050
Know Your Ingredients ..... 1058
Index ..... 1088

Interviews

On November 24, 1997, Ethan Becker joined barnesandnoble.com on AOL to discuss the revised, all-purpose Joy of Cooking. Along with a team of internationally praised chefs, Becker updated this American classic for the '90s, adding timesaving tips and diverse new recipes.



VogelBN: Hello, and welcome, Mr. Becker! We are pleased to have you tonight!

Irma S Rombauer: Good evening! Great to be here!


VogelBN: The audience is brimming with questions, so if you're ready, we'll dive right into them.

Irma S Rombauer: Sounds good!


Question: Most kids aren't allowed to hold a knife until they're 13, but I bet you were integrated into the kitchen pretty quickly. What is your first kitchen memory?

Irma S Rombauer: When mother was baking cookies and I got to lick the spoon.


Question: What motivated you to remove the "Canning and Preserves" chapter from Joy?

Irma S Rombauer: Space. We either had to enlarge it or drop it, and we felt the pasta and vegetable chapters were more necessary.


Question: A friend recently gave me an automatic bread maker as a shower gift. What does it do, and is the bread still as good?

Irma S Rombauer: The automatic bread maker is not as good as breads made by hand, but waking up to the smell of fresh bread is worth the price of admission. We use it for fresh cinnamon raisin toast — mmmmmmm!


Question: I am intrigued by the design of the recipes in Joy of Cooking. Who decided to list the ingredients throughout the recipe as opposed to all at the beginning? And why?

Irma S Rombauer: This format was invented by my grandmother as a space saver, and I think it is the most logical and easiest-to-use method.


Question: At the end of the introduction, I noticed a section crediting "Testers." That must be the best job in the world! How can I become a tester for the next edition?

Irma S Rombauer: It is harder work than you might think. But just to let you know,testers are chosen through friends who vouch for their taste buds. And actually, in this day and time, with the food world so expanded, there are many professionals who do just that for a living.


Question: Please help me make a good chicken-fried steak! Every time I try, the coating either falls off or gets greasy and oil-saturated. How hot should the oil be, what type, and what should the breading be made of, and how long should it fry? Thanks!

Irma S Rombauer: The oil should be very hot. The breading should be made using the batter you'll find in the new Joy for Chicken Fried Steak, page 663. Fry two to three minutes each side. Turn only once.


Question: I use your pecan pie recipe every Thanksgiving, but I had to adjust it a little because the crust kept burning. What can I do to prevent this?

Irma S Rombauer: Try checking the temperature of oven. You can find a hanging thermometer at most housewares departments. Inaccurate oven temperatures are a chronic problem.


Question: I love the new chapter "Little Dishes." I recently made samosas for a cocktail party; they were very successful. What inspired you to devote a chapter to meze, tapas, and the like?

Irma S Rombauer: They can be a creative core for a fun meal or party!


Question: I'm 86 and I've had a copy of Joy since I was married. I'm worried that the new version won't have my favorite recipes, like Beef Wellington or Tuna, Noodle and Mushroom Soup Casserole. What should I expect?

Irma S Rombauer: Beef Wellington is still there, but you will find most canned soups removed from recipes. But that doesn't mean you can't use them if you prefer.


Question: With one of the biggest culinary holidays approaching, I would like to know what Thanksgiving was like for the Rombauer-Becker family. Thanks!

Irma S Rombauer: That's a big question! It could take all night, but by and large, it was very similar most years to Thanksgiving dinners in homes across the country. The big difference was probably in dessert, as we generally had hazelnut torte instead of pumpkin pie.


Question: I tried making the cheese sauce for your cheese french toast and the top of the sauce was oily and runny, and the bottom was thick and not too appetizing. How can I improve?

Irma S Rombauer: What kind of cheese did you use? It sounds to me as if you're using too much heat when making the sauce. Try reducing the heat when cooking the sauce and increase the heat when you cook the toast.


Question: Is the main idea of the new edition to bring the cookbook up-to-date nutritionally or to take advantage of the many new ingredients now available year-round?

Irma S Rombauer: Definitely both. The new JOY was needed for a number of reasons. Recent developments in nutrition and new ingredients were two of the major reasons for the revision. One of the other big reasons was America's new lovefor big flavors. Yay!


Question: I have a question about sifting flour. I follow the Joy pancake recipe every Sunday morning. When I sift the flour and remeasure, I always end up putting back a significant amount of "overflow." Has the presift idea been eliminated?

Irma S Rombauer: Yes, we have eliminated the need to sift in the basic pancake recipe.


Question: Your cousins Brian and Charlotte Furness of Washington, D.C., wish you success with the new Joy and would appreciate more on how your mother and grandmother inspired you to continue the Rombauer-Becker tradition.

Irma S Rombauer: Hi, Brian and Charlotte! Carrying on the tradition seemed like the logical thing to do. Besides...who else?


Question: Is it okay to freeze the mince pie (your recipe) and cook it a few days later?

Irma S Rombauer: I would recommend refrigerating rather than freezing — but only or a few days.


Question: Do you hope your son will help out with the next edition?

Irma S Rombauer: A parent always has hopes, but he is young and still has many other things to do first.


Question: You worked with numerous internationally renowned chefs on the new edition. Your friend Stephen Schmidt contributed to five sections. He must be a very good friend. Could you comment on his involvement?

Irma S Rombauer: Stephen was invaluable. He has earned the nickname "Fix-it" for a very good reason. His experiences as a cooking instructor in classes all over America keep him very in-touch with what is being cooked, as well as what people want to cook.


Question: What is the biggest difference between the new Joy and old Joy?

Irma S Rombauer: You'll find the major emphasis is on freshness and flavor. The new veggie chapter is over 100 pages long; there is a chapter for pasta, a chapter on beans and grains.... The biggest difference is that it is written for today rather than 20 years ago.


VogelBN: Thank you so much for joining us tonight, Mr. Becker.

Irma S Rombauer: It has been a pleasure. And to all who joined us, I wish you Happy Thanksgiving and lots of joyful cooking!


Recipe

This recipe can be found in Joy Of Cooking's Stuffing chapter.

BASIC BREAD STUFFING
8 to 10 cups

This and the bread stuffing recipes that follow yield enough to stuff a 14- to 17-pound turkey. Many of the variations yield enough for an additional small casserole of stuffing. To stuff an oven roaster or 6 to 8 rock Cornish hens, halve the recipes. For a larger turkey, increase all the ingredients by half. The optional egg makes the stuffing firm. If you prefer the bread to be moist, skip the toasting step.

Position a rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Toast until golden brown:

1 pound sliced firm white sandwich, French, or Italian bread, including crusts, cut into 1/2-inch cubes, or 10 cups lightly packed bread cubes

Turn into a large bowl. Heat in a large skillet over medium-high heat until the foam subsides:

4 to 8 tablespoons (1/2 to 1 stick) unsalted butter

Add and cook, stirring, until tender, about 5 minutes:

2 cups chopped onions 1 cup finely chopped celery

Remove from the heat and stir in:

1/4 to 1/2 cup minced fresh parsley
1 teaspoon dried sage, or 1 tablespoon minced fresh
1 teaspoon dried thyme, or 1 tablespoon minced fresh
I teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated or ground nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
Stir into the bread cubes and toss until well combined. Depending on how much butter you started with and how firm you want the stuffing, stir in, a little at a time, until the stuffing is lightly moist but not packed together:
1/3 to 1 cup chicken stock 1 to 2 large eggs, well beaten (optional)

Adjust the seasonings. To use as a stuffing, reheat just before spooning it into the bird(s). Or moisten with additional:

Stock and/or egg
and turn into a large, shallow buttered baking dish. Bake in a 350°F oven until the top has formed a crust and the stuffing is heated through, 25 to 40 minutes.

This information can be found in the Joy Of Cooking's Poultry chapter.

RULES FOR STUFFING BIRDS

1. Always stuff the bird just before roasting‹never ahead of time, which would give any harmful bacteria that might be present in the cavity ample time to breed.

2. Have the stuffing hot and pack it loosely in the body and neck cavities. The stuffing must reach a temperature of 160°F during roasting to ensure that any possible pathogens are killed. If it is cold and packed tightly into the bird, it will not heat to this point until long after the bird is cooked through.

3. You must close the cavities in order to keep the stuffing in place. The quickest and most efficient way to do this is by sewingthe cavities shut with a trussing needle and twine. If you do not own a trussing needle, secure the body cavity with small skewers and lacing (kits for this purpose are sold at kitchen shops) and close the neck cavity with toothpicks.

4. When the bird has cooked through, take the temperature of the stuffing by plunging the stem of the thermometer deep into the body cavity. If the stuffing has not yet reached 160°F, simply take the bird out of the oven, scoop the stuffing into a buttered casserole, and bake it in the hot oven while the bird stands before carving.

5. Finally, always take all the stuffing out of the cooked bird as soon as you begin to carve. Stuffing left inside a large turkey may remain warm for several hours, even if the bird is refrigerated, providing a perfect environment for bacterial growth.

Copyright © 1997 by Simon & Schuster Inc., The Joy of CookingTrust and the MRB Revocable Trust

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