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King of the Roses: A Horse Racing Mystery

King of the Roses: A Horse Racing Mystery

by V. S. Anderson
King of the Roses: A Horse Racing Mystery

King of the Roses: A Horse Racing Mystery

by V. S. Anderson

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Overview

Jockey Chris Englund has won a record-tying five Kentucky Derbies, horse racing's jewel. But his uncompromising honesty in a world where cheating pays has stalled his career.
Out of the blue, he gets the leg up on the odds-on Derby favorite, Knidos. But Derby week turns to ashes when he's offered half a million dollars to hold Knidos and set off a betting bonanza for criminal cartels around the world.
The drive to the Derby wire tests Chris Englund's courage and a great horse's heart in a brutal battle against insurmountable odds. If he throws the race, he’ll betray the honor he’s fought for all his life. If he rides to win, he’ll destroy the horse and lose the woman he loves.
KING OF THE ROSES is the story of a champion rider’s choice between temptation and truth, between honesty and his life. The prize isn’t just a garland of Derby roses. It’s a love that demands more than he’s ever been asked to give.
“No racing novel since the advent of Dick Francis's series of mysteries has captured my admiration like this book."—Maryland Horse
“The Derby is run in less time than it takes to describe it—but the description itself is one of the most exciting whodunit chapters you're ever likely to come across.”—San Diego Magazine
(horse books, mystery thrillers, equestrian romance, horse racing suspense, run for the roses, Kentucky Derby)



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Product Details

BN ID: 2940151950237
Publisher: V. S. Anderson
Publication date: 07/01/2015
Sold by: Smashwords
Format: eBook
File size: 675 KB

About the Author

Would you rather see my books than read about me? (The books are a lot more entertaining--at least I suspect so). To find them, you can scroll endlessly to the bottom of this verbiage, or you can check out the titles and ID numbers:

KIng of the Roses: A Horse Racing Mystery: "I used to think Dick Francis has no peer. . . . Now I am not so certain."--The Maryland Horse (547497)

Jockey Chris Englund has won five Kentucky Derbies, horse racing's jewel. But his uncompromising honesty has stalled his career. Out of the blue, he gets the leg up on the odds-on Derby favorite. But Derby week turns to ashes when he's offered half a million dollars to throw the race. But if he rides to win, he will destroy a great horse and lose the woman he loves.

Blood Lies: "A read winner, this one." --The Los Angeles Times (547498)

Young Ted Whysse comes home to his family's fabulous breeding farm to investigate his best friend's death. He wants no part of his inheritance, nor of the magnificent stallion Kite. What he wants, though his heart knows better, is his dying father's beautiful young wife. But when he learns she has a deadly secret, he must risk other lives to save her—including his own.

NEW! Three Strides Out: A Horse Show Novel of Suspense (1313051)

Adrenaline’s good for something, Robb Slaughter tells people when they ask where he found the courage to climb into a burning trailer to rescue a valuable horse. But it will take more than adrenaline for Robb to find out who put that horse there and why—and to make the monsters pay.

If you're a glutton for words, read on! (You've been warned.)

I was probably about ten years old when a cousin (or perhaps an adult in my extended family?) told me, "You're just a kid. You can't write a book!" I remember planting my fists on my hips (well, metaphorically, anyway), and answering, "I can too!"
And I did.
My books were wilder, crazier, than the Black Stallion books I devoured. I still have the first one, in pencil on lined notebook paper. It was about this wild black mare who would come storming down out of the north Georgia mountains—believe it or not, an exotic never-never-land to an Atlanta schoolgirl—to steal tame horses right out of their stalls and carry them off to her secret hideout in a hidden cove.
In fact, the whole reason I wanted to write books was to capture my dreams of horses. So I wrote and wrote and wrote, drafting, revising, feeling that flush of excitement when you just can't write fast enough to get down the exciting things that are happening. I was hooked on horses, and hooked on writing about horses. Then on writing itself. I had a special Schaeffer cartridge pen, and I loved the way the ink flowed out of it; I loved making the shapes of the beautiful letters on the page.
But I still wanted most to write about horses, and to own one. It was my practical and sensible dad who said, "You can't save enough money to buy a horses." I was sixteen. Fists on hips again. "I can too!"
And I did. For the next twenty-five years, I owned horses, all kinds. I taught riding, broke babies, bought, schooled, and sold Thoroughbreds off the racetrack. I went to work for a trainer on the backside at Tampa Bay Downs. I came to know busy shedrows as the sun rose; the heartbeat throb of galloping horses working in sets down the backstretch; Cuban coffee in the crowded tackroom; the creak of the walking machine after we gave the horses their baths. I knew what it was like, for a short time, to have my own racehorse, to master his wild explosions as he tried to wheel and bolt with me on the track. I knew what it was like to be run away with and learn to like it (almost). I loved it.
And I finally put it in a book.
This one was a lot more plausible than my wild-mare story, but it gave me the same thrill. But that was nothing to thrill of getting it published. King of the Roses (St. Martin’s, 1983, now available on Smashwords at https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/547497) is the story of champion jockey Chris Englund: At the end of his career, he’s got one last chance to win a sixth, record-setting Kentucky Derby—until he’s offered $500,000 to throw the race. When he learns that defying the crooks and riding to win will possibly ruin the horse and cost him the woman he’s come to love, he finds that what his reputation demands isn’t what his conscience compels him to do. Into Chris and his world, I threw all the ins and outs, all the hopes and fears, all the people and their language, that had engulfed me on the racetrack. When I was done, I thought, now for something completely different. But my editor said, "I want you to write one about the Thoroughbred breeding industry."
So I did.
In Blood Lies (Bantam, 1989, also available on Smashwords at https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/547498), young Ted Whysse comes home to Kentucky to investigate the murder of his best friend. He doesn’t want any part of his inheritance, the fabulous old stud farm, Holyhead; he doesn’t even want the farm’s finest treasure, the champion stallion Kite. What he does want, though in his heart he knows better, is his dying father’s beautiful young wife, Lucky. When he learns that Lucky has a secret that’s likely to kill her, he has to decide how many other lives he’ll put at risk to save her. Will he risk his own?
So I owe a lot to horses--two whole books! But I owe more. It was the process of writing and rewriting, under the guidance of wonderful editors, that prepared me to move beyond my horse stories. After returning to grad school and earning a Ph.D. in teaching college writing, I published articles in most of our major journals. Now retired from teaching, I have as many as four different writing projects going all the time. My two novels-in-progress—no, wait, three—no, four!—proceed apace. I host two blogs, justcanthelpwriting.wordpress.com, about my experiences and observations as a published novelist, and collegecompositionweekly.com, which summarizes current research for college writing professionals.
In all these projects I'm grateful for the gift of writing, which, in the end, I really owe to those darned horses who made me want to write in the first place. I've come to know that what writing teachers tell their students is true. Writing is a means of inquiry and discovery. It's a way of finding out what you know and what you'd like to know. It's a way of making daydreams solid. It's a way of finding out what's beyond those closed doors people sometimes tell you can't be opened. For me, writing has opened many doors.
I used to do my writing sitting in a canoe tucked into a crook in a Florida river. Now I do it looking out at a southern Indiana cornfield, watching the goldfinches and cardinals and hummingbirds mob my feeders. The cats and dogs are sprawled all around me in their favorite places. And down the road, my lovely horse Paddy is no doubt dreaming that I'll come ride him. Or at least give him peppermints. I've got a story about him out there in dreamland, waiting. It's going to be about this girl who wanted more than anything to ride. . . .

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