Linux Security Cookbook: Security Tools & Techniques

Linux Security Cookbook: Security Tools & Techniques

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Linux Security Cookbook 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Linux Security Cookbook is a good hands-on guide to the major aspects of securing your Linux box. This book offers many quick reference guides to pieces of software for securing or testing your system and goes through many different means of fortifying your box including: -controlling system access with firewalls -monitoring your network -using SSH and SSL -intrusion detection systems -authentication and cryptographic keys -encrypting files and email messages -system security probing The recipes in this book allows administrators to learn quick and easy ways to secure their systems including over 150 ready-to-use scripts and configuration files without having to look up or research specific syntax. This book is definitely a quick hands-on guide to securing and monitoring your system and would recommend it to anyone looking for a good source of guides and ready-to-use scripts and configurations.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Given the increasing frequency of attacks against computers, by virus writers, spammers and others, any sysadmin needs to pay careful attention to securing your system. All the more so if the computer acts as a server, rather than just a desktop leaf on a network. On the server side, you often have unix or linux systems. This recent book by OReilly is hence timely. Concise, with a good contents and index. The authors write clearly, in what may be considered a 'standard' cookbook style. Each problem is summarised, and a brief but entirely adequate how-to answer is then given. It is part of this style that they do not go into the theory of public/private key encryption, for example. But they readily provide references to fuller discussions on many topics. Checking the index for comprehensiveness revealed one curious omission. There is no entry for 'virus'. While it seems like a glaring oversight, I think the authors are correct in doing so. Antivirus software exists, and you would merely have to run it against a set of files. And this software is not usually part of an operating system. Also, most viruses are written for Microsoft desktops. Thus far, linux viruses are actually pretty rare. The title says 'Linux'. Actually, if you are running any major unix (Solaris, HPUX...), don't take that title too literally. The problems you face will often be the same as those described here. The solutions will often likewise be the same. Most unixes now have many utilities in common with each other and linux. You may be able to map an answer given here to a similar approach on your machine.