Mania

Mania

by Craig Larsen

NOOK Book(eBook)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780786023127
Publisher: Kensington
Publication date: 11/01/2009
Sold by: Penguin Random House Publisher Services
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 384
File size: 1 MB

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Mania 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Darcia on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I found this book dizzying and impossible to get into. The constant shift from present to distant past to recent past kept me off balance to the point where I couldn't grasp any part of the story. The main character's own sense of imbalance became my own, though not in a way I could get lost in with him. Larsen's constant use of phrases such as "He noticed..." and "He felt..." kept the character's experiences and emotions at a distance, which in turn kept my own from being involved. It was more like I was watching him watch the story unfold, rather than experiencing it with him.
bcquinnsmom on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Actually, I thought this book was quite a fun read, and consider that this isn't my usual fare, I think that says a lot.The main character, Nick Wilder, is a photographer for the Seattle Telegraph, and is generally on hand to collect shots other papers can't get. He was young when his parents died, and came to depend on his brother Sam, with whom he has always been very close. One night after he and Sam were together in downtown Seattle, Nick and Sam are attacked by a rough-looking homeless man. Nick comes out of it with a few injuries, but Sam is dead, Nick's a bit cloudy on what exactly happened, and as you go through the book, he continues to flash back on that episode, as well as others that haunt him. Nick's girlfriend Sara tries to ease his fears but he's still uneasy. There's much more to the novel, but it's hard to summarize without giving away the show.The dark atmosphere of this novel is reflective of Nick's internal darkness throughout. The author's writing and the level of suspense he creates will keep you reading. It was fun as a reader to try and piece together events playing out in Nick's mind while trying to figure out what's really going on. Don't let the flashbacks and returns to the present bother you -- they're necessary to the overall story and the author pulls it off so you won't be confused. Overall, a fun read that I can recommend to suspense & mystery readers.
richardderus on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I don't think thrillers are all created equal. I think this book is a thriller because there isn't a sales category called "Noir" although, given the rate at which this kind of novel is being published, there soon will be.I wasn't thrilled by the gory, bloody, lovingly depicted death and torture in the book. I wasn't thrilled by the editor's decision to leave a dizzying number of time-shifts in place. I wasn't thrilled by the sheer vileness of so many of the characters.I was thrilled by the author's evident craftsmanship with words. I was thrilled by the plot's pacing, despite the time shifting...it all *worked* for the story being told. I was thrilled by the absence of a Hollywood ending.And in spite of all the "ew" moments, I was thrilled by the relentless rightness of the story...that sense I get, in some books, that the story was authentically engaging and exciting to the author himself. It's intangible, it's unprovable, but it's also unmistakeable and unfakeable.Recommended for the "noir" crowd, the puzzle people, and the gore ghouls. NOT for general consumption.
kariannalysis on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
On the rainy streets of Seattle, Nick Wilder is leaving a bar with his brother one moment, waking up and finding his brother dead the next. Nick is a photojournalist for a newspaper and with the snap of a finger, things start getting stranger and stranger for him. He starts blacking out and people start dying. Is he the one doing the killing? Why is he always around when the victims are found? And why are so many homeless men involved in murders?This is one of those books that I can only read every now and then. The death and murder and drama, I can only handle them a little at a time. Otherwise, I¿d be having nightmares like Nick. And I get really angry when I can¿t figure out who the bad guy is. I thought I knew, then they¿d die. I thought I¿d figured it out again, then they¿d die. It was very nerve racking, but I do appreciate a good story that I can¿t figure out.Although this was a little bloodier than I like, but my really only complaint I had for this book was the jumpy-ness. I read a couple other reviews on the book, some agreed, some didn¿t think it was an issue. There were times when we¿d be with Nick today, then the next page, we¿d be back when he was 10. There were times when we¿d be with him after the death of his brother Sam, then we¿d be during the middle of the murder. There were only a couple of times when I had to keep reading to figure out where we were. It wasn¿t a major problem for me, but it did keep me thinking. This is the kind of book that keeps your turning pages and keeps you on the edge of your seat. It¿s not one though, that I could read again soon. With books like these, that once you know the killer, there¿s no surprise, it¿s hard for me to want to read them again. They never have the same intensity the second time around. For that reason, I can¿t give this book 5 bookmarks. I only give 5 to those that I know I will pick back up. But, I will give
mikedraper on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Nick Wilder, a seattle newspapre photographer, has a specialty in taking pictures of crime scenes. His older brother, Sam, is the success of the family and has supported Nick since their parent's death.Nick has photos of two photos of murder victims, their mutilated bodies too horrible for the newspaper to print. Then, one night he's walking with his borther when a man dressed in rags jumps from the shadows, kills Sam and runs off.In a flashback method, we view the time prior to Sam's murder. After taking photos of one of the stabbing victims, Nick is looking at them on his laptop while at a Starbuck's restaurant. Sara Garland introduces herself and suggests that Nick ask her out. They begin a relationship.Nick isn't a very interesting character to read about. He's jealous of his brother's success and seems egotistical. What Sara sees in him is a mystery. Nick views his past and has memories that disturb him and since he had his brother's blood on him, Nick is now viewed as a suspect.This lengthy novel was hard to finish. There were some good surprises and interesting segments but with none of the characters being people that the reader could care for, the conclusion didn't matter and was predictible. However, the author does show talent. With a more concise story and characters with whom the reader can sympathise with, the writer may be far more successful in the future.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BookAddictFL More than 1 year ago
I found this book dizzying and impossible to get into. The constant shift from present to distant past to recent past kept me off balance to the point where I couldn't grasp any part of the story. The main character's own sense of imbalance became my own, though not in a way I could get lost in with him. Larsen's constant use of phrases such as "He noticed..." and "He felt..." kept the character's experiences and emotions at a distance, which in turn kept my own from being involved. It was more like I was watching him watch the story unfold, rather than experiencing it with him.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
harstan More than 1 year ago
Seattle Telegraph newspaper photographer Nick Wilder has always looked up to his brother Sam; who is on his way to becoming a billionaire if the drug trials for the anti-psychotic Matrix Zarcon holds up as expected. Nick currently covers the brutal murders of men so unrecognizable their family members could not identify them. He becomes part of the story when a homeless man without shoes stabs and kills his sibling. The incident triggers in Nick flashbacks and hallucinations that make him and the police wonder if he is the vicious psychopathic killer who murdered his own brother. In a coffee shop, Nick meets Sara Garland, stepdaughter of the Telegraph's owner Jason Hamlin. They hit if off and she helps him cope with the nasty hallucinatory incidents and horrific dreams that he fears are repressive memories. The cops question Nick re Sam's murder and that of another victim, but let him ago as they lack evidence although Police Lieutenant Dombrowski believes he allowed the killer to leave; he plans to find proof to lock away this maniac for life. Throughout the story line Nick struggles with his sanity as he is unable to delineate reality from dreams of events that happened to him. The audience is as unsure whether Nick is the killer or suffering from some other psychotic derangement. MANIA is a fascinating thriller that delves deep into the mind of a struggling protagonist who ponders what reality really is. Although a final spin seems over the top of the Needle fans will relish this action-packed psychological thriller starring a beleaguered hero who no longer has the mental fight to argue with people telling him what the truth is. Harriet Klausner