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Moorish Literature
     

Moorish Literature

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MOORISH LITERATURE
COMPRISING
ROMANTIC BALLADS, TALES OF THE BERBERS, STORIES OF THE KABYLES, FOLK-LORE, AND NATIONAL TRADITIONS
TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH FOR THE FIRST TIME
Editor, Z. El Bey
WITH A SPECIAL INTRODUCTION BY
RENÉ BASSET, PH.D.
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FRANCE, AND DIRECTOR OF THE ACADÉMIE D'ALGER

With

Overview

MOORISH LITERATURE
COMPRISING
ROMANTIC BALLADS, TALES OF THE BERBERS, STORIES OF THE KABYLES, FOLK-LORE, AND NATIONAL TRADITIONS
TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH FOR THE FIRST TIME
Editor, Z. El Bey
WITH A SPECIAL INTRODUCTION BY
RENÉ BASSET, PH.D.
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FRANCE, AND DIRECTOR OF THE ACADÉMIE D'ALGER

With additional list of famous Noble Moors throughout History.
CONTENTS

MOORISH BALLADS
Fatima's Love
The Braggart Rebuked
The Admiral's Farewell
Moriana and Galvan
The Bereaved Father
The Warden of Molina
The Loves of Boabdil and Vindaraja
The Infanta Sevilla and Peranguelos
Celin's Farewell
Celin's Return
Baza Revisited
Captive Zara
The Jealous King
The Lovers of Antequera
Tarfe's Truce
The Two Moorish Knights
The King's Decision
Almanzar and Bobalias
The Moorish Infanta and Alfonzo Ramos
The Bull-fight of Zulema
The Renegade
The Tower of Gold
The Dirge for Aliatar
The Ship of Zara
Hamete Ali
Zaide's Love
Zaida's Jealousy
Zaida of Toledo
Zaide Rebuked
Zaida's Inconstancy
Zaide's Desolation
Zaida's Lament
Zaida's Curse
The Tournament of Zaide
Zaide's Complaint
Guhala's Love
Azarco of Granada
Azarco Rebuked
Adelifa's Farewell
Azarco's Farewell
Celinda's Courtesy
Gazul's Despondency
Gazul in Love
Celinda's Inconstancy
The Bull-fight
Lovers Reconciled
Call to Arms
Gazul Calumniated
Gazul's Despair
Vengeance of Gazul
Gazul and Albenzaide
Gazul's Arms
The Tournament
Abunemeya's Lament
The Despondent Lover
Love and Jealousy
The Captive of Toledo
The Blazon of Abenamar
Woman's Fickleness
King Juan
Abenamar's Jealousy
Adelifa's Jealousy
Funeral of Abenamar
Ballad of Albayaldos
The Night Raid of Reduan
Siege of Jaen
Death of Reduan
The Aged Lover
Fickleness Rebuked
The Galley Slave of Dragut
The Captive's Lament
Strike Sail
The Captive's Escape
The Spaniard of Oran
MOORISH ROMANCES
The Bull-fight of Gazul
The Zegri's Bride
The Bridal of Andalla
Zara's Ear-rings
The Lamentation for Celin
THE STORY OF SIDI BRAHIM OF MASSAT
FIVE BERBER STORIES
Djokhrane and the Jays
The Ogre and the Beautiful Woman
The False Vezir
The Soufi and the Targui
Ahmed el Hilalieu and El Redah
POEMS OF THE MAGHREB
Ali's Answer
In Honor of Lalla
Sayd and Hyzyya
The Aïssaoua in Paris
Song of Fatima
The City Girl and the Country Girl
POPULAR TALES OF THE BERBERS
The Turtle, the Frog, and the Serpent
The Hedgehog, the Jackal, and the Lion
The Stolen Woman
The King, the Arab, and the Monster
The Lion, the Jackal, and the Man
Salomon and the Griffin
Adventure of Sidi Mahomet
The Haunted Garden
The Woman and the Fairy
Hamed ben Ceggad
The Magic Napkin
The Child and the King of the Genii
The Seven Brothers
Half-a-Cock
Strange Meetings
The King and His Family
Beddou
The Language of the Beasts
The Apple of Youth





POPULAR TALES OF THE KABYLES
Ali and Ou Ali
The Infidel Jew
The Sheik's Head
The Wagtail and the Jackal
The Flute-player
The Child
The Monkey and the Fisherman
The Two Friends
The Robber and the Two Pilgrims
The Little Child
The Wren
The Mule, the Jackal, and the Lion
Thadhellala
The Good Man and the Bad One
The Crow and the Child
H'ab Sliman
The King and His Son
Mahomet ben Soltan

The region which extends from the frontiers of Egypt to the Atlantic Ocean, and from the Mediterranean to the Niger, was in ancient times inhabited by a people to whom we give the general name of Berbers, but whom the ancients, particularly those of the Eastern portion, knew under the name of Moors. "They were called Maurisi by the Greeks," said Strabo, "in the first century A.D., and Mauri by the Romans. They are of Lybian origin, and form a powerful and rich nation."1 This name of Moors is applied not only to the descendants of the ancient Lybians and Numidians, who live in the nomad state or in settled abodes, but also to the descendants of the Arabs who, in the eighth century A.D., brought with them Islamism, imposed by the sabre of Ogbah and his successors. Even further was it carried, into Spain, when Berbers and Arabs, reunited under the standard of Moussa and Tarik, added this country to the empire of the Khalifa. In the fifteenth century the Portuguese, in their turn, took the name to the Orient, and gave the name of Moors to the Mussulmans whom they found on the Oriental coast of Africa and in India.
The appellation particularizes, as one may see, three peoples entirely different in origin--the Berbers.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940012898609
Publisher:
Morisco Publishing
Publication date:
06/24/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
294
Sales rank:
792,831
File size:
442 KB

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Moorish Literature (Large Print Edition) 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago