My Darling Winston: The Letters Between Winston Churchill and His Mother

My Darling Winston: The Letters Between Winston Churchill and His Mother

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Overview

A significant addition to the Churchill canon, My Darling Winston traces Churchill’s emotional, intellectual, and political development over a forty-year period as confided to his mother.

My Darling Winston is an edited collection of the personal letters between Winston Churchill and his mother, Jenny Jerome, between 1881—when Churchill was just six—and 1921, the year of Jenny’s death. Many of these intimate letters— between two gifted writers—are published here for the first time, and the exchange of letters between mother and son has never before been published as a correspondence.

A significant addition to the Churchill canon, My Darling Winston traces Churchill’s emotional, intellectual, and political development as confided to his primary mentor, his mother. As well as providing a basic narrative of Jenny’s and Winston Churchill’s lives over a forty-year period, My Darling Winston tells the story of a changing mother-son relationship, characterized at the outset by Churchill’s emotional and practical dependence on his mother, but which is dramatically reversed as her life begins to disintegrate tragically towards its end.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781681779485
Publisher: Pegasus Books
Publication date: 10/02/2018
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 748,418
File size: 43 MB
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About the Author

David Lough studied history at Oxford University. After a career in finance, his first book was No More Champagne (Picador), a Wall Street Journal and The Times of London Best Biography of the Year. He lives in England.
Randolph Churchill is the great-grandson of Sir Winston Churchill. After attending Harrow, Randolph served in the Royal Navy and subsequently attended Buckingham University. He is a Trustee of the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust, Honorary Fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge, Director of the Armed Services Charities Advisory Company, and Trustee of the Churchill Centre in both the United States and United Kingdom. A regular speaker at Churchill conferences and dinners, Randolph and his wife have four children and live close to Sir Winston's home at Chartwell in Kent.

Table of Contents

Foreword ix

Introduction xiii

Editorial Notes xxxv

1 His Mother's Son 1881-90: 'Mice are not caught without cheese' 1

2 Trials with a Teenager 1890-92: 'Too busy with your parties' 37

3 Coping with a Cadet 1892-4: 'What a goose you are - write!' 67

4 Dying by Inches 1894: 'I feel too low to write' 97

5 Single Parent 1895-6: 'You really ought to leave no stone unturned' 115

6 A Long Way Apart 1896: 'This godless land of snobs and bores' 147

7 Egypt or India? 1896-7: 'All my political ambitions shall be centred in you' 173

8 Army or Politics? 1897: 'I am a Liberal in all but name' 195

9 A Splendid Episode 1897: 'I play for high stakes' 215

10 Hobson's Choice 1897-8: 'My pen wanders recklessly' 247

11 Both Stone Broke 1898: 'Relax not a volt of your energy' 269

12 Lances and Pistols on the Nile 1898: 'It passed like a dream' 297

13 Final Passage to India 1898-9: 'Patriotism and art mix as little as oil and water' 315

14 The Sinews of War 1899-1900: 'I understand you as no other woman ever will' 337

15 End of an Era 1900-01: 'Are all Mothers the same?' 371

16 Both Hunted 1901-2: 'Naturally we see little of each other' 385

17 The Pig Goes to Market 1903-5: 'I cannot help admiring Chamberlain's courage' 399

18 Turning the Tables 1905-6: 'Yon evidently forgot you were writing to your Mother' 425

19 Solace in Scribblings 1907-8: 'Le Bon Dieu has work for you yet' 447

20 End of a Marriage 1908-14: 'Of what use to chain him to me?' 481

21 Coda at the Front 1915-18: 'I am a great believer in your star' 521

22 Last Words 1920-21: 'You are tired out and a little disheartened' 557

Appendix - People, Places 563

Acknowledgements 583

Image Permissions 586

Sources and Letter References 587

Bibliography 595

Index 598

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