Paul of Dune

Paul of Dune

by Brian Herbert, Kevin J. Anderson
3.7 64

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Overview

Paul of Dune by Brian Herbert, Kevin J. Anderson

Frank Herbert's Dune ended with Paul Muad'Dib in control of the planet Dune. Herbert's next Dune book, Dune Messiah, picked up the story several years later after Paul's armies had conquered the galaxy. But what happened between Dune and Dune Messiah? How did Paul create his empire and become the Messiah? Following in the footsteps of Frank Herbert, New York Times bestselling authors Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson are answering these questions in Paul of Dune.

The Muad'Dib's jihad is in full swing. His warrior legions march from victory to victory. But beneath the joy of victory there are dangerous undercurrents. Paul, like nearly every great conqueror, has enemies--those who would betray him to steal the awesome power he commands. . . .

And Paul himself begins to have doubts: Is the jihad getting out of his control? Has he created anarchy? Has he been betrayed by those he loves and trusts the most? And most of all, he wonders: Am I going mad?

Paul of Dune is a novel everyone will want to read and no one will be able to forget.



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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781429954723
Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date: 09/16/2008
Series: Dune , #6
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 512
Sales rank: 159,104
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Brian Herbert, the author of numerous novels and short stories, has been critically acclaimed by leading reviewers in the United States and around the world. The eldest son of science fiction superstar Frank Herbert, he, with Kevin J. Anderson, is the author of Hellhole and continues his father's beloved Dune series with books including The Winds of Dune, House Atreides, Sandworms of Dune, among other bestsellers. He also wrote a biography of his father, Dreamer of Dune. Herbert graduated from high school at age 16, and then attended U.C. Berkeley, where he earned a B.A. in Sociology. Besides an author, Herbert has been an editor, business manager, board game inventor, creative consultant for television and collectible card games, insurance agent, award-winning encyclopedia salesman, waiter, busboy, maid and a printer. He and his wife once owned a double-decker London bus, which they converted into an unusual gift shop. Herbert and his wife, Jan, have three daughters. They live in Washington state.


Brian Herbert, the author of numerous novels and short stories, has been critically acclaimed by leading reviewers in the United States and around the world. The eldest son of celebrated science fiction author Frank Herbert, he, with Kevin J. Anderson, is the author of Hellhole and continues his father’s beloved Dune series with books including The Winds of Dune, House Atreides, Sandworms of Dune, among other bestsellers. He also wrote a biography of his father, Dreamer of Dune. Herbert graduated from high school at age 16, and then attended U.C. Berkeley, where he earned a B.A. in Sociology. Besides an author, Herbert has been an editor, business manager, board game inventor, creative consultant for television and collectible card games, insurance agent, award-winning encyclopedia salesman, waiter, busboy, maid and a printer. He and his wife once owned a double-decker London bus, which they converted into an unusual gift shop. Herbert and his wife, Jan, have three daughters. They live in Washington State.

More than two dozen of Kevin J. Anderson's novels have appeared on national bestseller lists; and he has over eleven million books in print worldwide. His works have been translated into over 22 languages including German, Japanese, Spanish, Chinese, Korean and Hebrew.

For a book signing during the promotional tour for his comedy/adventure novel AI! PEDRITO!, Anderson broke the Guinness World Record for "Largest Single-Author Signing," passing the previous records set by Gen. Colin Powell and Howard Stern.

Kevin worked in California for twelve years as a technical writer and editor at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, one of the nation's largest research facilities. At the Livermore Lab, he met his wife Rebecca Moesta and also his frequent co-author, Doug Beason. After he had published ten of his own science fiction novels to wide critical acclaim, he came to the attention of Lucasfilm, and was offered the chance to write Star Wars novels.

The novels in his Star Wars Jedi Academy trilogy became the three top-selling science fiction novels of 1994. He has also completed numerous other projects for Lucasfilm, including the 14 volumes in The New York Times bestselling Young Jedi Knights series (co-written with his wife Rebecca Moesta). His three original Star Wars anthologies are the bestselling SF anthologies of all time.

Kevin is also the author of three hardcover novels based on the X-Files; all three became international bestsellers, the first of which reached #1 on the London Sunday Times bestseller list. Ground Zero was voted "Best Science Fiction Novel of 1995" by the readers of SFX magazine. Ruins hit The New York Times bestseller list, the first X-Files novel ever to do so, and was voted "Best Science Fiction Novel of 1996."

Kevin's thriller Ignition, written with Doug Beason, has sold to Universal Studios as a major motion picture. Anderson and Beason's novels have been nominated for the Nebula Award and the American Physics Society's "Forum" award. Their other novels include Virtual Destruction, Fallout, and Ill Wind, which has been optioned by ABC TV for a television movie or miniseries. His collaborative works include ARTIFACT (Forge Books; May 2003), a thriller written with F. Paul Wilson, Janet Berliner, and Mathew Costello; and DUNE: THE BATTLE OF CORRIN (Tor Books; August 2004) written with Brian Herbert, Book 3 of their acclaimed Legends of Dune trilogy, and the sequel to the bestsellers DUNE: THE BUTLERIAN JIHAD and DUNE: THE MACHINE CRUSADE.

Kevin's solo work has garnered wide critical acclaim; for example, Climbing Olympus was voted the best paperback SF novel of 1995 by Locus Magazine, Resurrection, Inc., was nominated for the Bram Stoker Award, and his novel Blindfold was a 1996 preliminary Nebula nominee. Anderson has written numerous bestselling comics, including Star Wars and Predator titles for Dark Horse, and X-Files for Topps.

Kevin's research has taken him to the top of Mount Whitney and the bottom of the Grand Canyon, inside the Cheyenne Mountain NORAD complex, into the Andes Mountains and the Amazon River, inside a Minuteman III missile silo and its underground control bunker, and onto the deck of the aircraft carrier Nimitz, inside NASA's Vehicle Assembly Building at Cape Canaveral. He's also been on the floor of the Pacific Stock Exchange, inside a plutonium plant at Los Alamos, behind the scenes at FBI Headquarters in Washington, DC, and out on an Atlas-E rocket launchpad. He also, occasionally, stays home and writes. Kevin and his wife, writer Rebecca Moesta, live in Colorado.

Customer Reviews

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Paul of Dune (Heroes of Dune Series #1) 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 64 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Until I had started reading his works in collaboration with Brian Herbert, my opinion of Kevin Anderson wasn't extraordinarily favorable. His forays into the world of Star Wars seemed like overambitious fan fiction, cutting too many corners and becoming notorious in my view for using too many flimsy metaphors. As a science fiction writer, however, he's really found a niche in the Dune series, and this latest offering is as fine an example as one could ask for. As with any book set in the Dune Universe, you really have to know your stuff, but, strangely, less so in this book than in others. There's less of the technical jargon here than in past novels by Anderson and Herbert, or at least they're not as emphasized in this novel. Instead the novel is spent on the characters and their motives, building their stories. Sometimes this effort is too brief, as the story switches between characters and archs in quick chapters. As much as this novel, and presumably its sequels, are intended to bridge the gap between Dune and Dune Messiah, it also feels like a reintroduction, and often feels dangerously close to becoming too expository. Still, by now any fan of the series will have grown to love the characters and settings to the point where any new stories involving them would be looked forward to. At this point, Herbert and Anderson have become so comfortable in their ownership of these characters and this setting that it all flows very well and is very enjoyable. My overall criticism of Paul of Dune is that it feels abbreviated, even for a series book. But this is only a mild distraction, and I deem it an entertaining read and a promising beginning for the rest of the Heroes of Dune Series.
Okieflyboy More than 1 year ago
Frank Hebert's classic Dune series represented a major advance in Science Fiction, with the First installment being the most novel, unexpected and captivating. So, it is little wonder that fans would want to read about what happened to Paul, the Atriedes, and his Fremen co-harts during the period immediately following his ascendancy to Emperor. Unfortunately, Brian Hebert and his co-author Keven Anderson made a fundamental mistake...they assumed the reader would be intimate with the characters from the original work. Their attempts to weave background into the novel to further explain Paul during his formative years simply served to confuse rather than enlighten the reader. Simply put, "Paul Of Dune" leaves even the most devoted of fans feeling unfulfilled. I suspect new readers will simply be bewildered.
RichardB More than 1 year ago
I understand why Brian is riding on his fathers coattails, everyone's got to make a buck. I've read a few of his other attempts and they were ok I guess, not terrible, not great. But here, Brian and Anderson actually have the balls to overwrite Frank Herbert's finest work Dune! A novel that has been acclaimed by critics worldwide as one of the finest works of Science Fiction ever crafted. Right out of the blue these two decide to make us believe that Dune (as written by Frank Herbert) wasn't entirely true. That when Paul was a child, Duke Leto attempted on not one, but two occasions to take a wife other than Jessica. Brian commits this assault against his father's finest work just to create a slimy under-plot to fill out this abortion of a book. I'm beginning to realize that that if his father wasn't Frank Herbert, Brian would have never been published. Frank Herbert had more talent under one fingernail than any that Brian can honestly lay claim to. Where Frank sliced through intrigue with the skill of a swordmaster wielding a rapier, Brian stumbles about in the dark flailing with a battle hammer. And the addition of Anderson doesn't seem to help much. A son should show more respect to his father.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A huge fan of the original Dune series I have read the Frank Herbert books several times over and found them a great read every time. I have also read all of the prequels and sequels that Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson have penned and while I have never thought them worthy of the gold standard set by Frank Herbert, they have been entertaining. That is, up until now. With this book they have effectively destroyed any interest I might have read in reading any future Dune novels. This book was intended to fill in the gaps between Dune and Dune Messiah. It fails miserably. It proposes an interesting premise: history is in the eyes of the historian who records it. Then it proceeds to do nothing to develop this premise. The characters are mostly already known to the reader and nothing new is learned about them; no new ground is broken.It plods along so predictably that it is almost embarrassing. Furthermore , the continued repeating of expressions coined by Frank Herbert is beyond irritating. How many times can these authors refer to "Sapho stained lips"? The authors have done this in past books, but never to the extent that they do it in this one. It's shameless and it cheapens these beloved terms in this reader's humble opinion. One wonders, if there was nothing to write, why give adoring Dune fans this pablum? Surely we deserve better. The memory of Frank Herbert deserves better.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
"I leave my footprints in history, even where I do not tread."

Paul Atreides, Maud'Dib to his loyal subjects, has unleashed a bloody Jihad across the universe. The old Emperor has fallen - his Imperium destroyed. It is now Paul's right and duty to erase Shaddam IV's reign from history and begin anew.

He will face many hardships along the way; assassination attempts, interplanetary wars, and deciphering who he can trust within his own household. And there is always the matter of the spice trade. "He who controls the spice, controls the universe" - a phrase that Maud'Dib understands all too well.

Paul will question his own motives and actions for ruling the universe, and eventually come to the realization that his decisions will shape the course of history.

PAUL OF DUNE was written to fit in between the original novel, DUNE, and its sequel, DUNE MESSIAH. Herbert and Anderson have attempted to bridge several gaps between the two novels, and have done so successfully. Fans of Dune will find their beloved characters, planets, and societies just as they left them. The authors do an incredible job of staying true to Frank Herbert's original vision of the Dune universe.

A great addition to an excellent series of books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thankfully, this book was 60000 times better then that thing called the the Prelude Trilogy. The story about Paul at the age 12 didn't really matter to the rest of the book and was overdetailed. But at least the part set between 10,194-7 was very good (minus that bit about DUNE canonality, I'll pretend I didn't read that), it gave some interesting details about Lady jessica and Gurny beimg given the Baroney of Giedi Prime. This book was so much better than the ones before it and I was glad to read this time around. 90% B.
Rubicks More than 1 year ago
I really liked how this novel cleared up a few discrepancies between the original series and previous Dune books by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson. However, some of the plot was just too far-fetched. This is not a "must read" but it was fun to take another peak into the Dune universe.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Kevin Anderson's 'get-in-get-out' approach to writing chapters 'no chapters longer than 3 pages' doesn't do justice to ANY of these Post-Herbert stories, which leaves the reader feeling cheated. One of the best traits of the original series is that Frank took his time to craft quality stories but it seems his son just wants to hurry up and tell a story, and to make a quick buck, no doubt, and this approach doesn't do the original series justice. In fact, these new books are beginning to cast an unfavorable light on the original series, and it's embarrassing.
PainFrame More than 1 year ago
A drawn crysknife should always taste blood. This book spackles in the giant crack that sits between the stories of Dune proper and its’ sequel Dune Messiah. Now if you read those two Frank Herbert books in a row, as I did, you probably at no point sat around wondering what happened in the skipped over period of time. But even though it never occurred to me to wonder - I still loved every word of this fine book. It’s impossible to say what Frank Herbert would have written had he lived longer, but I must say I have been astounded and impressed with the care that both Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson have taken with this series. This is a loving tribute to Dune and all of it’s vast universe. I love everything about this series and am always delighted to return to it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book fills in some of the missing pieces that Frank Herbert left out of the original series. Anyone hooked on the Dune universe will like this one
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought it was well writen. However I was a little disppointed that it would alternate between adult Paul and his childhood. This book was avdertised as what happened after Dune and before Dune Messiah.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dont blame the son he just adds the name as all is written by the second like all the star trek novels except after maybe one and the mrs roosevelt not bad alternative world to make it more interesting but i dont csre much for the first dune and wasnt a good movie either
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love the series so much... i reread it in chhronological order. The only thing that makes 4 stars is....having to read sections of this book then read another book, and return to another section in this book.
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