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Rosalind Franklin and DNA / Edition 1
     

Rosalind Franklin and DNA / Edition 1

5.0 2
by Anne Sayre
 

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ISBN-10: 0393320448

ISBN-13: 9780393320442

Pub. Date: 07/17/2000

Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.

Rosalind Franklin's research was central to the discovery of the double-helix structure of DNA. She never received the credit she was due during her lifetime.
In this classic work Anne Sayre, a journalist and close friend of Franklin, puts the record straight.

Overview

Rosalind Franklin's research was central to the discovery of the double-helix structure of DNA. She never received the credit she was due during her lifetime.
In this classic work Anne Sayre, a journalist and close friend of Franklin, puts the record straight.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393320442
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
07/17/2000
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
590,170
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.60(d)

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Rosalind Franklin and DNA 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was filled with useful information. It was enough for me to do a book report on Rosalind Franklin. She is a VERY AAWSOME writterin this book and in her pictures.I just simply loved her book!!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book is about an incredible female scientist, Rosalind Franklin. Rosalind led a short and full life. Her work and name is forever related with the discovery of DNA. But her story is not told well or widely. I bought this book simply because I find no alternative. In his book 'the double helix', the Nobel prize winner, Professor Watson, described Rosalind from his personal and obviously unpleasant impression. He admitted indirectly nonethelss the DNA model rests heavily on the reliable X-ray data obtained by Roselind or her approach. Anne Sayre gives her view of Rosalind's life. Anne is a journalist, she knew Roselind in person, through the contact of her scientist husband. Anne interviewed many people and did research on the book. Her writing style in this book is debative. There is more argueing over Watson's personal account than telling Rosalind's stories. You can find those stories among the heavy arguments (some of them are very enlightening), and you will find them absolutely touching. I laughed when Rosaland knocked at the door of a French visitor and asked for a French lesson. I imagined that her subsequent visit and work in France was part of her search for happiness, adventure and success. I was very sad at her running lonely in a heated race toward the crown of DNA. She was honest, fair, and forthcoming in scientific discussions and she expected the same from the other. In her private life, she babysat for her friends, she let her friend use her flat when she was away and she left a fridge full of the special cheese, drink and food her friend was particularly fond of. Her image becomes bigger in my mind when I found out that Rosaland took the surprise from Watson and Crick calmly, and she even befriended with the Cricks. I could not hold my tears back when she was bravely facing the early end of her own life. I wish the book could be written differently. For example, there is no need to argue over whether Rosalind was good looking. Show the photos. In my view, there is beauty, tranquility and intelligence in her look. Unfortunately, the book has only two photos of Rosalind, one on each side of the front cover. But I do understand the emotion of the author, especially, Roselind was a dear friend of hers.