St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves

St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves

by Karen Russell
4.0 32

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St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
heyjessica More than 1 year ago
Interesting premises for the stories, but none of them seemed complete. Every time I thought, "Oh, this is getting really good", the story would end. It was sort of a letdown. After two stories you see the pattern: character with an extraordinary talent/background/toy/story, meager plot, and then no resolution. The more stories I read, the less I liked the collection. And I really, really, wanted to like it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I could not get into any of these stories at all. I would begin one, read a few pages and be instantly bored or confused.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You did it publishers! The blurb and cover art completely sold me on this book, and then I struggled to keep my eyes open while I slowly turned the pages and checked page numbers to see I my copy was missing pages at the end of each story when it ended, mid-climax. Karen Russel is clearly a talented writer and highly imaginative person, if only she could forget her High School AP vocab sheet and everything she learned in Undergrad creative writing class. I wouldn't recommend this to anyone, I certainly will never read another book by this author again. There are ten stories in this collection (all about children who seem like rehashes of the same character), each one starts out about as boring as a middle-school history book. Then a very compelling premise slowly unravels and builds towards a climax and ends stops abruptly. A waste of money - just read the wikipedia blurbs, at least they skip the exposition.
Guest More than 1 year ago
With all the hype around this book I was very excited to read it only to be highly, awfully disappointed. Each story is written as if from a formula being taught to young writers in creative writing programs around the country these days: set up a problem, create some overly eccentric characters, use the flashiest most poetic language you can muster, and then write a resolution that half resolves the problem and half leaves it open, making the reader say, 'Oh, wow, what next?' Another problem is that many of the stories are told in first-person by an adolescent narrator, and in the present tense, yet they use that flashy, poetic language -- how many teenagers are smart enough out there to write such stories? It's obviously the author doing the writing, not the character-narrator, and so the whole illusion of the story breaks down and fails. Also, none of the themes in this book are new: growing up is hard to do, my parents aren't there for me, the world stinks. It's the same old thing wrapped up in a new package. I'd recommend a pass on this one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you can, track down Russell's debut in The New Yorker magazine in June of this year - 'Accident Report.' Absolutely astonishing narrative in a completely fictional world.
harstan More than 1 year ago
These are ten delightful fables that star young heroes and heroines living in an offbeat magical Florida Everglades. The irony behind the uplifting tales is that they involve growing up to face reality yet still retain the magical environs of childhood while on the verge of losing their youthful enthusiasm forever. Each contribution is haunting (not just Olivia¿s tale) and satirical as Karen Russell brings out the inspirational ¿I won¿t Grow Up¿ from Peter Pan while having to pretend to have grown up albeit what are girls who just want to have fun raised by wolves but now left with nuns to do except to fake assimilation. Whether one searches for a dead sister using enchanted goggles or has a Minatare as a dad, ST. LUCY'S HOME FOR GIRLS RAISED BY WOLVES: AND OTHER STORIES is a fun compilation that cleverly lampoons adult solutions to children¿s problems by sending them to their room in this case a camp for troubled sleepers. --- Harriet Klausner
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A collection of short stories, within fantastic and Gothic, and a slight dark humor. The stories are engaging to the point, as it happens with other short stories, that at the end you feel cheated, as if your were reading a loose chapter from a larger narrative, there is frustration of being left hanging. In all a good book, but if you like closed loops you may not enjoy it, if you want to peer into fantastic stories, even if you will never know what happened after everything went south, it will be a good one to check.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think Karen Russell is the finest writer I have read in a looooong time. Some of her sentences make me gasp, they are so lovely. While her short stories are more than complete on their own, they are so fertile and consuming, I did not want some of them to end. I am also enjoying her new collection, and will impatiently wait for a new novel.
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catwak More than 1 year ago
For me, the charm of these stories is that the juxtaposition of fantasy with realistic, vivid descriptions, creates situations that engaged me emotionally in spite of my rational self.
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sanken211 More than 1 year ago
This collection of stories is magical, humerous, creative and very enjoyable. I don't typically read collections of stories, preferring novels, but this one is good and worth reading.
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