The Brass Giant: A Chroniker City Story

The Brass Giant: A Chroniker City Story

by Brooke Johnson

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Overview

The Brass Giant: A Chroniker City Story by Brooke Johnson

Sometimes, even the most unlikely person can change the world

Seventeen-year-old Petra Wade, self-taught clockwork engineer, wants nothing more than to become a certified member of the Guild, an impossible dream for a lowly shop girl. Still, she refuses to give up and tinkers with any machine she can get her hands on, in between working and babysitting her foster siblings.

When Emmerich Goss—handsome, privileged, and newly recruited into the Guild—needs help designing a new clockwork system for a top-secret automaton, it seems Petra has finally found the opportunity she's been waiting for. But if her involvement on the project is discovered, Emmerich will be marked for treason, and a far more dire fate will await Petra.

Working together in secret, they build the clockwork giant, but as the deadline for its completion nears, Petra discovers a sinister conspiracy from within the Guild council…and their automaton is just the beginning.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780062387165
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 05/05/2015
Series: Chroniker City
Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 577,791
File size: 867 KB
Age Range: 12 - 18 Years

About the Author

Brooke Johnson is a stay-at-home mom and tea-loving writer. As the jack-of-all-trades bard of the family, she journeys through life with her husband, daughter, and dog. She currently resides in Northwest Arkansas but hopes to one day live somewhere more mountainous. Follow her on Twitter.

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The Brass Giant: A Chroniker City Story 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Kspina More than 1 year ago
I thought I was done with Steampunk. I assumed the genre just wasn't for me. I follow the author on Google +, and I liked the sample pages. I was pleasantly surprised by this book. I'm excited to read the next one.
MariaD1 More than 1 year ago
Enjoyable Steampunk Novel......... I received a complimentary copy of this book as a part of a book tour for a fair and honest review. I rated this 4 out of 5 Stars. A steampunk novel set in the early 1860’s, The Brass Giant by Brooke Johnson is an enjoyable mid length story with colorful characters, sharp dialogue, a bit of mystery and a touch of romance. While a book dealing with mechanics and machinery, Ms. Johnson creates a world that is fairly easy to understand, even for those of us not mechanically inclined. In addition Ms. Johnson tackles some of society’s issues of the time: poverty, the lack of women’s rights and quality education being denied to the poor. If you’re looking for something a little different in your historical reading, you’re going to want to give this book a try. Naturally intelligent and mechanically gifted, Petra Wade wants nothing more than to be an engineer and become a member of “The Guild”, something denied to her due to the misfortune of being born a girl. Donning a disguise, dressed as a man and using her brother’s first name, Petra attempts to bluff her way into the university but is unable to enroll due to a lack of money and lack of a transcript. Continuing to work as a shop girl, Petra works on any machine she can get her hands on and refuses to give up on her dream. Especially after she meets Emmerich Goss, a new member of “The Guild” who recognizes her from her attempt to gain entrance into the university, who needs help designing a new clockwork for a top-secret automaton and turns to Petra for help.  Ms. Johnson does a good job developing both Petra and Emmerich’s characters right from the start. I was able to connect with both characters and understood Petra’s anger at the injustice of being denied an education and “career” as an engineer due to her gender. Ms. Johnson also does a good job showing how the class separation and financial struggles of the day kept many gifted people from being able to pursue their dreams. The friendship and mutual respect that grows between Petra and Emmerich is based on their shared interests and a desire for self-improvement. They in essence fell for each other’s brain first. The secondary characters are well developed and made some very interesting contributions to the story. I especially liked Mr. Sticket, Petra’s boss at the shop, who was also her secret teacher and who believed in Petra’s talent. While “The Guild” was originally presented as the villain, as it were, of the story, it turns out that there are several different factions at play and most of them don’t have good intentions. Will Petra be able to help Emmerich design the clockwork required for the new automaton? Will their budding romance get in the way of Petra realizing her dreams? You’ll have to read The Brass Giant to find out. I enjoyed it and look forward to reading the next book in this series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
KatyMessier More than 1 year ago
We started out learning about Petra and how much she wants to become an engineer. The society she lives in is sexist and operates under a heavy caste system. The poor don’t get ahead, especially if they happen to be women. The way women are treated isn’t glossed over in the least. Because it’s all coming from the perspective of someone in the position – I think it’s easier to relate to her. I instantly felt for her because of this. She has this dream and passion and will do anything to fulfill it. Then all of the action starts taking place but it felt like it quickly got drowned out by this very intense romantic interlude. I don’t mind romance but this relationship felt a bit over the top. There were instances that seemed so elaborate and drawn out it would actually push me out of the story entirely. I wanted more of the action, more of the Petra who had a strong passion for engineering. I didn’t mind that she fell in love but it almost felt like she began putting her passion more into her new love interest than the engineering. The steampunk themes were very well detailed through out the book and I appreciated the glossary at the end. In the way that the movie Titanic is more about a romance happening on a sinking ship, I felt this was more a romance happening in an older steampunk society that happened to have some series conflict going on. If you really like young adult romance I think this would be a book for you to enjoy. Disclosure: I received this free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.