×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Deerslayer: Leatherstocking Tales Volume 5
     

The Deerslayer: Leatherstocking Tales Volume 5

by James Fenimore Cooper
 

The first book in James Fenimore Cooper’s Leatherstocking Tales, The Deerslayer is the exciting tale of the Deerslayer—known by name as Natty Bumppo—a young white man raised by a Delaware Indian tribe in the pre-revolutionary American colonies. Forced to kill for the first time in battle, Natty is tortured by his Huron captors and comes

Overview

The first book in James Fenimore Cooper’s Leatherstocking Tales, The Deerslayer is the exciting tale of the Deerslayer—known by name as Natty Bumppo—a young white man raised by a Delaware Indian tribe in the pre-revolutionary American colonies. Forced to kill for the first time in battle, Natty is tortured by his Huron captors and comes to oppose many of the customs and practices of his tribesmen.

The Deerslayer, though written after the first four books in the Leatherstocking Tales, takes place before the events of The Last of the Mohicans and is considered to be the first of the series. The Deerslayer has been adapted for film, radio, and television.

HarperPerennial Classics brings great works of literature to life in digital format, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperPerennial Classics collection to build your digital library.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“James Fenimore Cooper was the first great American novelist.”—A. B. Guthrie

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781443433754
Publisher:
HarperCollins Canada
Publication date:
02/25/2014
Series:
Leatherstocking Tales , #5
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
542
Sales rank:
561,463
File size:
688 KB

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

From the Introduction by Leslie A. Fiedler

In 1789, the year James Fenimore Cooper was born, the thirteen North Americancade he enjoyed a leisured existence as a gentleman farmer on inherited lands in both Cooperstown and Westchester County. Popular legend holds that Cooper turned to writing when his wife jokingly suggested that he attempt a novel, but it is now known thatme a gentleman farmer and householder. The one thing he still needed was a proper wife, which he was lucky enough to find in Susan DeLancey. She, as he already knew, came from a family richer and more securely upper class than his own and, as he learned, was also an affable, intelligent woman who was fond of reading. Cooper was content with this, yet at first he did not join her when she was busy with her books but indulged in the male pastimes of hunting and hiking in the nearby hills.

After Susan had given birth to four daughters, to whom she at first read and then taught to read to each other, Cooper would stay close enough to wherever they were reading to hear them. Surely some of the erotic and sentimental passages read in the voices of those he loved must have moved him deeply. But there is no record of any positive responses on his part. A single negative one, however, is recorded in almost everything that has ever been written about him.

One time, those accounts tell us, annoyed by the ineptitude of the text being read, he cried out, “Why do you waste time and money reading trash that anybody who can spell his own name could write better. Even me!” To this Susan is said to have answered–jokingly, according to some–“Why don’t you give it a try?I’d love to see you try.” Cooper responded that he would and, surprisingly enough, did, finally producing a full-length imitation of Jane Austen. When it was in print he would tell anyone who would listen that he was now a professional writer who would write fifty more books–and sell them. This almost no one believed he would do, and many wished he would not even try.

Though Cooper was aware that neither the critics nor the general reader were interested in any more Jane Austen clones, he felt he had to keep on writing because the family inheritance on which he had been living had begun to shrink, and at the same time it had become much more expensive to feed, clothe, and educate his growing daughters. What he really wanted to write was another book that saw the world through female eyes and talked about it in a female voice. In fact, he continued for a little while to experiment with transvestite fiction, even publishing two such short stories under the female pseudonym of Jane Morgan.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Copyright 2002 by James Fenimore Cooper

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
Praise for James Fenimore Cooper:

“His memory will exist in the hearts of the people... [and his works] should find a place in every American’s library.”—Daniel Webster

“Cooper emphatically belongs to the nation. He has left a space in our literature which will not easily be supplied.”—Washington Irving

Meet the Author

James Fenimore Cooper was a nineteenth-century American author and political critic. Esteemed by many for his Romantic style, Cooper became popular for his depiction of Native Americans in fiction. Before Cooper considered himself a writer, he was expelled from Yale University, served as a midshipman for the United States Navy, and became a gentleman farmer. Cooper wrote many notable works including The Pioneers, The Last of the Mohicans, and The Red Rover, which was adapted and performed on stage in 1828. Cooper passed away in 1851 at the age of 61.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
September 15, 1789
Date of Death:
September 14, 1851
Place of Birth:
Burlington, New Jersey
Place of Death:
Cooperstown, New York
Education:
Yale University (expelled in 1805)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews