The Emancipation Procrastination

The Emancipation Procrastination

by William Carson

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Overview

The Emancipation Procrastination by William Carson

Mose and Lilybell Middleton had had enough of picking cotton and saw no future in continuing it. They were especially mindful of the lack of a future in the South for their daughter, Hannah Rose. Their plans were to make a secretive effort to move to the North when cotton season was over, but the plans were overheard by the landowner's young son, James, which inconveniently expedited the move. A poignant consequence was an almost-lifelong breach in the friendship between James and Mose's younger brother, Actris. With significant help from a black preacher, the Middletons were successful in their northern exodus. Before leaving South Carolina, Hannah Rose, with uncanny prevision, left one of her two possessions to help her later in life make a decision to come back home.

Gradually their lives began to improve after a lengthy acclimation to their new surroundings. Mose got a job as a janitor in a factory in Philadelphia owned by Catherine Rutledge Bradford, part of an old and influential family from Charleston.

Mose's hard work and ingenuity were recognized by his superiors and rewarded accordingly. Lilybell's intelligence and refinement came to the attention of Mrs. Bradford, who took her into her home as hostess and companion.

After several years, Mrs. Bradford's declining health necessitated a change in the factory's ownership that didn't value Mose's abilities, which put him on top of the list for removal.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781449796457
Publisher: Westbow Press
Publication date: 06/28/2013
Pages: 228
Sales rank: 626,261
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.52(d)

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The Emancipation Procrastination 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I would recommend this book to anyone interested in learning more about segregation in the Deep South. This book is written by someone who had a front-row seat to the lives of both races affected by it during the 1930s -1950s.  It is written in a style that will pull you into the lives if the colorful characters and the highs and lows of their lives. It is excellent storytelling as well as being a lesson in southern history.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bill Carson has opened a time capsule exposing the life of a young black couple growing up in  rural South Carolina during the 50’s and 60’s.  While I think his book reflects a first-hand  account of the prevailing situation at the time throughout the South, I found it both insightful yet  embarrassing.  I believe for some, the book will serve as recognition of the dual standard of  treatment that existed for blacks.  Blacks, on the other hand, hopefully will view it as evidence  that regardless of the circumstances, the “dream” is always possible.  Though not an expert on  civil rights issues, I’m convinced this work provides a somewhat unique glimpse into the  movement heretofore overlooked by many that proved to be a milestone in the fight for racial  equality.  One thing is for sure…”Emancipation Procrastination” is a real winner!  It should be a  MUST for readers of all races seeking the truth and the possibilities for success in life.  
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bill Carson has opened a time capsule exposing the life of a young black couple growing up in rural South Carolina during the 50’s and 60’s.  While I think his book reflects a first-hand account of the prevailing situation at the time throughout the South, I found it both insightful yet embarrassing.  I believe for some, the book will serve as recognition of the dual standard of treatment that existed for blacks.  Blacks, on the other hand, hopefully will view it as evidence that regardless of the circumstances, the “dream” is always possible.  Though not an expert on civil rights issues, I’m convinced this work provides a somewhat unique glimpse into the movement heretofore overlooked by many that proved to be a milestone in the fight for racial equality.  One thing is for sure…”Emancipation Procrastination” is a real winner!  It should be a MUST for readers of all races seeking the truth and the possibilities for success in life.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Conclusions right on, easily verified by those who grew up in the south in the 50s and 60s, love the depth in the autobiographical connection