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2940162251118
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The Great Concern

The Great Concern

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Overview

Edward Pearse died at forty of tuberculosis, but during his final months, he wrote this book as a guide to his congregation, in order to direct them to life's one 'great concern,' namely, "to have all things set right, well-ordered, and composed in the matters of the soul before leaving this world." With wonderful clarity, the author shows how putting the spiritual concerns of the soul into the best posture possible for the hour of death is in actuality the key to living an abundant, God-honoring life. Or as Pearse explains,

"It is to fill up our time with duty, and our duties with grace; to use the time which is given to us in the pursuit of these ends—not to eat, drink, and please ourselves with creature comforts—but to serve and honor the Creator, to work out our salvation, to become acquainted with God and Christ, and to ensure ourselves of heaven and a blessed eternity."

Edward Pearse (c.1633–1674) was a Puritan pastor in London during a period of immense political and social upheaval in England. He (along with nearly two thousand other pastors throughout England) chose to resign his pulpit in 1662, rather than comply with the Act of Uniformity. Originally published in 1673, this classic work has been meticulously edited to benefit a new generation of Christian readers. Archaic language has been gently modernized, and helpful footnotes have been added to aid the reader. This edition includes a biographical preface and review questions designed to facilitate group discussion or personal reflection.


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Product Details

BN ID: 2940162251118
Publisher: The Digital Puritan
Publication date: 04/02/2021
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 774,930
File size: 578 KB

About the Author

Edward Pearse (c.1633–1674) was a Puritan pastor in London during a period of immense political and social upheaval in England. He (along with nearly two thousand other pastors throughout England) chose to resign his pulpit in 1662, rather than comply with the Act of Uniformity.

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