The Rocket That Fell to Earth: Roger Clemens and the Rage for Baseball Immortality

The Rocket That Fell to Earth: Roger Clemens and the Rage for Baseball Immortality

by Jeff Pearlman
4.2 11

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Overview

The Rocket That Fell to Earth: Roger Clemens and the Rage for Baseball Immortality by Jeff Pearlman

“Pearlman’s book develops a stark, unsparing picture of Clemens’s life that surpasses anything that’s come before.”
Boston Globe

 

Jeff Pearlman, the New York Times bestselling author of The Bad Guys Won! and Boys Will be Boys, now brings us The Rocket That Fell to Earth, an explosive account of the rise and fall of Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees superstar Roger Clemens, arguably the greatest pitcher of all time. Called “exceptional” by Time magazine, The Rocket That Fell to Earth is a stunning portrait of a sports legend equally loved and loathed by fans and colleagues, his life and his storied career, and his place at the dead center of professional baseball’s shocking steroid controversy.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780061886720
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 03/24/2009
Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 368
Sales rank: 635,997
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Jeff Pearlman is a columnist for SI.com, a former Sports Illustrated senior writer, and the critically acclaimed author of Boys Will Be Boys, The Bad Guys Won!, and Love Me, Hate Me.

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The Rocket That Fell to Earth: Roger Clemens and the Rage for Baseball Immortality 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Jermster More than 1 year ago
This is a sad tale. Not just sad for Roger Clemens who remains in denial, it is a sad commentary on baseball fans in general who had to know what was happening and turned a blind eye. For kids, as a so-called "hero" not only lied to everyone in baseball but the government as well. For baseball who continues to ignore what steroids did to the game and what they are still doing.For all the players who played by the rules. Roger Clemens is just one more poster boy for the pampered athlete who gets everything he wants, even a free ticket to break the rules. Clemens is an arrogant athlete who still doesn't understand why he is offensive to anyone who believes in fair play. The book does a good job of showing how Clemens became the man he became. It is a story every young athlete should read. There is a fine line between the Hall of Fame and the Hall of Shame. If baseball is lucky it will never have to deal with Clemens again. I don't think it is that lucky. After all, they created the Rocket.
gtutty1 More than 1 year ago
This is a sad tale. Not just sad for Roger Clemens who remains in denial, it is a sad commentary on baseball fans in general who had to know what was happening and turned a blind eye. For kids, as a so-called "hero" not only lied to everyone in baseball but the government as well. For baseball who continues to ignore what steroids did to the game and what they are still doing.For all the players who played by the rules. Roger Clemens is just one more poster boy for the pampered athlete who gets everything he wants, even a free ticket to break the rules. Clemens is an arrogant athlete who still doesn't understand why he is offensive to anyone who believes in fair play. The book does a good job of showing how Clemens became the man he became. It is a story every young athlete should read. There is a fine line between the Hall of Fame and the Hall of Shame. If baseball is lucky it will never have to deal with Clemens again. I don't think it is that lucky. After all, they created the Rocket. If you want to read another sad tale--read Selena Roberts's A-Rod. Another well-written tale about another fraud.
Puko More than 1 year ago
This was a relatively quick and easy read. I've read some of Pearlman's other stuff and expected more out of this, though. The overview of Clemens early years was good, but the rest (from the time he reached the majors on) broke little new ground. It seems like writers are stumbling over themselves to get a book written every time another player hits the steroid list (which is why there's another Clemens book that was published within a month or so of this one) and content may suffer as a result.
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