×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Stone Roses
     

The Stone Roses

5.0 5
by The Stone Roses
 

See All Formats & Editions

When Manchester's Stone Roses released their eponymous debut album in 1989, British youth were abandoning rock music en masse for acid-house sounds and communal raves. Without resorting to dance beats, Stone Roses effortlessly tapped into this cultural sea-change and almost single-handedly made British rock music hip again. Stone Roses remains forever

Overview

When Manchester's Stone Roses released their eponymous debut album in 1989, British youth were abandoning rock music en masse for acid-house sounds and communal raves. Without resorting to dance beats, Stone Roses effortlessly tapped into this cultural sea-change and almost single-handedly made British rock music hip again. Stone Roses remains forever faultless. The dreamlike opener, "I Wanna Be Adored," and the enthralling conclusion, "I Am the Resurrection," ultimately caused a plague of overconfident Brit youth declaring similar greatness, but coming from the Roses' Jagger-like vocalist Ian Brown, such claims were temporarily justified. Gifted guitarist John Squire, bassist Mani, and drummer Reni all helped set a musical agenda of classic psychedelia married with punk energy and rave swagger, a sound at its best on the pop anthems "She Bangs the Drums" and "Made of Stone," the backward-guitar riffing "Don't Stop," and the raucous "This Is the One." A post-album single, the lengthy and funky "Fool's Gold," was added to later American pressings of Stone Roses and then that was it: the group got famous, became embroiled in law suits, and reemerged only in 1995, with the stodgy and wrongly titled Second Coming. The Stone Roses, however, remains a stellar contribution to the canon of classic debuts.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Since the Stone Roses were the nominal leaders of Britain's "Madchester" scene -- an indie rock phenomenon that fused guitar pop with drug-fueled rave and dance culture -- it's rather ironic that their eponymous debut only hints at dance music. What made the Stone Roses important was how they welcomed dance and pop together, treating them as if they were the same beast. Equally important was the Roses' cool, detached arrogance, which was personified by Ian Brown's nonchalant vocals. Brown's effortless malevolence is brought to life with songs that equal both his sentiments and his voice -- "I Wanna Be Adored," with its creeping bassline and waves of cool guitar hooks, doesn't demand adoration, it just expects it. Similarly, Brown can claim "I Am the Resurrection" and lie back, as if there were no room for debate. But the key to The Stone Roses is John Squire's layers of simple, exceedingly catchy hooks and how the rhythm section of Reni and Mani always imply dance rhythms without overtly going into the disco. On "She Bangs the Drums" and "Elephant Stone," the hooks wind into the rhythm inseparably -- the '60s hooks and the rolling beats manage to convey the colorful, neo-psychedelic world of acid house. Squire's riffs are bright and catchy, recalling the British Invasion while suggesting the future with their phased, echoey effects. The Stone Roses was a two-fold revolution -- it brought dance music to an audience that was previously obsessed with droning guitars, while it revived the concept of classic pop songwriting, and the repercussions of its achievement could be heard throughout the '90s, even if the Stone Roses could never achieve this level of achievement again.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/25/1990
Label:
Jive
UPC:
0012414118424
catalogNumber:
1184

Tracks

Album Credits

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Stone Roses 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this record is a miraculous piece of work. with abstruse biblical and literary references, seriously classic hooks, and honest musicianship (insane drums that cannot be duplicated and sweet rolling basslines), this record not only changed the course of british music throughout the entire 90s, but managed to start a series of movements in its wake previously akin only to the likes of the velvet underground. without them, there might be brit-pop, but nobody would care about it. this record is as important as the white album and the only thing in contemporary times that can touch it is the la's record. if ian brown could have sang on-key live as well as he did on this record, they would have taken over the world. that being said, we should be happy we even have the stone roses at all because the summation of all that is good and that has ever been good in rock-n-roll has somehow made it on to this record. and you will be hard pressed to find someone who disagrees with this.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's hard to believe this many great songs were packed into one album, let alone a debut. Something must be in the water in Manchester because for a city that has produced the likes of Joy Division/New Order and Oasis, this album, however briefly, outshined all of them. In fact, it could be argued that without Stone Roses, Oasis, Blur and the rest of Brit-rock don't make as much an impact.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one of my alltie favorites, pure music..with the feeling..
Guest More than 1 year ago
Yeah this album moved borders in indie music scene in the beginning of nineteens.You could call it the cornerstone of so called britpop. After that most of the indie bands tried to sound like Stone Roses.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago