War Noir: Raymond Chandler and the Hard-Boiled Detective as Veteran in American Fiction

War Noir: Raymond Chandler and the Hard-Boiled Detective as Veteran in American Fiction

by Sarah Trott

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781496808646
Publisher: University Press of Mississippi
Publication date: 11/03/2016
Pages: 272
Product dimensions: 6.20(w) x 16.60(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Sarah Trott, Brigend, South Wales, United Kingdom, is a lecturer in American studies at Swansea University. She has published in the edited collection Men After War and the journal Comparative American Studies.

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War Noir: Raymond Chandler and the Hard-Boiled Detective as Veteran in American Fiction 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
brf1948 More than 1 year ago
I received a free electronic copy of this interesting look at the life and works of Raymond Chandler from Netgalley, Sarah Trott, and the University Press of Mississippi in exchange for an honest review. Thank you all, for generously sharing your work with me. As a young adult I started reading Raymond Chandler's work, partly because my father enjoyed him so much, and partly because film noir spoke to me. I don't think at that time I associated these genres together. Sarah Trott makes a compelling case for just that - and for the inclusion of Raymond Chandler into the glorified strata that is the Lost Generation of American authors. I grew up with a WWI disabled soldier in my life. My maternal grandfather fought in every major offensive after the US joined the Allies in WWI, and suffered that war's acknowledged form of PTSD, Shell shock, plus mustard gas exposure for his entire long life. He was a wonderful man when he was with us - but sometimes he was back in Europe and then he had to go away to the nearest VA hospital. And sometimes his eyes would change, and his voice would grow gruff and harsh and he would seem lost, and short with us, and then one of the children - he was always surrounded by children - would laugh at something, and he would often come back into his eyes. Just for the innocent laugh of a child. I will re-read Chandler and Hemingway and Dos Passos this winter, after the garden is in and the nights grow cold, to absorb once more all they had to offer to our understanding of the world changes brought about by World War One. And to close my eyes and see again the life return to Grandpa's eyes. Thank you, Sarah Trott, for bringing this all together, for me.