Instant Pot Baby Food and Toddler Food Cookbook: Wholesome Food That Cooks Up Fast in Your Instant Pot or Other Electric Pressure Cooker

Instant Pot Baby Food and Toddler Food Cookbook: Wholesome Food That Cooks Up Fast in Your Instant Pot or Other Electric Pressure Cooker

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Overview

Harness the power of your Instant Pot—or other electric pressure cooker or multi-cooker—to make fresh and flavorful, safe and natural, fast and convenient foods for your baby or toddler!

Parents everywhere are turning to do-it-yourself baby food making. They do so to ensure that the food they feed their children is all-natural and free of additives. They do it because, in recent years, pediatricians and dietitians have been recommending that a baby's diet—and especially a toddler's diet—feature a wide variety of ingredients, well beyond what you can buy in jars at the supermarket. And, nothing to sneeze at, they do it to save money—sometimes lots of money.

How do they find the time? It isn't always easy. Enter the wildly popular Instant Pot, along with other brands of electric pressure cooker, the perfect solution for time-crunched moms and dads. Pressure cooking is skyrocketing in popularity in large part because of its speed. You can cook up a batch of baby purees or toddler cereals in a matter of minutes. Consider how long some classic ingredients in baby foods, such as potatoes, apples, and squash, would take to cook up on a stove top or in an oven. Now reduce that time to a fraction of what it was and you can see why pressure cooking is the ideal method for making baby and toddler foods.
 
No less an expert than Barbara Schieving, the world's most widely read blogger on pressure cooking (her blog is called Pressure Cooking Today), author of the best-selling The Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook, and a mom and recent grandmother herself, delivers here 100 tasty and good-looking recipes that will make you feel good about how you are feeding your kids—and will make them smile with delight at mealtime.

For the youngest crowd, she serves up simple vegetable and fruit purees, more-complex combination purees, and an abundance of fruit sauces. For children who are entering toddlerhood, or are already there, there are cereals of all kinds and finger foods and spoon foods for all tastes, no matter how picky. With take-it-to-the-bank guidance on how to get the most from your cooker, plus loads of ideas on how to make and store big batches that will freeze for later use, this is a trustworthy kitchen companion parents will turn to again and again.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781558329690
Publisher: Harvard Common Press, The
Publication date: 08/20/2019
Pages: 176
Sales rank: 557,455
Product dimensions: 7.40(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

Barbara Schieving’s distinctive recipes and conversational style have earned her a dedicated readership around the globe. She is the creator of two popular recipe blogs: PressureCookingToday.com, where she shares family-friendly recipes for the electric pressure cooker/Instant Pot, and BarbaraBakes.com, where she shares her passion for baking. Her sites receive over 1.5 million page views each month. She is the author of the best-selling Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook; Instantly Sweet; and the ebook, Simply Sweet Dream Puffs. Barbara’s delicious recipes have been featured on iVillage, Betty Crocker, Shape, BlogHer, Babble, The Deseret News, and the Salt Lake Tribune. She lives in Herriman, Utah.

Jennifer Schieving McDaniel, Barbara Schieving's daughter, is a busy mother of three young children She uses her pressure cooker every day, often several times a day, to prepare baby food and nutritious family meals. Jennifer is the managing editor for PressureCookingToday.com.  

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

First Fruits and Vegetables

When introducing babies to solid foods, pediatricians recommend starting with just one new food at a time. Single-ingredient fruits and vegetables are gentle and great for baby's first solids. Plus, these made-fresh purees look and taste so much better than commercial first foods — you may find yourself eating some of them along with your baby.

Recipes

34 Apple Puree
35 Dried Apricot Puree
36 Dried Plum (Prune) Puree
37 Nectarine Puree
38 Peach Puree
40 Pear Puree
41 Butternut Squash Puree
43 Carrot Puree
44 Green Bean Puree
46 Pea Puree
47 Spaghetti Squash Puree
48 Sweet Potato Puree
49 4-in-1-Pot Single-Ingredient Purees

Apple Puree

Apples are naturally sweet and are loaded with vitamins and fiber. They would make a delicious choice for introducing your baby to fruits.

MAKES 3½ CUP (820 ML).

5 large soft apples (such as Jonagold, Fuji, or Golden Delicious), peeled,
cored, and quartered
¼ cup (60 ml) water

1 Place the apple quarters and water in the pressure cooking pot. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 4 minutes cook time.

2 When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes, then finish with a quick pressure release. When the float valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Allow to cool for 20 minutes.

3 Transfer the contents of the cooking pot to a blender jar or food processer and blend until very smooth. (Add water if needed to blend but use the minimum amount necessary.)

Tip

This recipe calls for peeled apples since apple skins have extra fiber, which can affect babies' sensitive tummies. Once your baby is a little older and ready for more texture in foods, you can skip peeling the apples if you prefer.

Dried Apricot Puree

If your baby isn't a fan of prunes, dried apricots have a similar effect with a very different, sweet-tart taste. By using dried, you never have to worry about whether your apricots will be ripe or sweet enough.

MAKES 1½ TO 2 CUPS (355 TO 475 ML).

1 cup (130 g) dried apricots, approximately 25
1¾ cups (410 ml) water

1 In the pressure cooking pot, add the dried apricots and water. Stir to ensure the dried apricots are completely submerged. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 10 minutes cook time.

2 When the cook time ends, turn of the pressure cooking pot. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes, then finish with a quick pressure release. When the float valve drops, carefully remove the lid.

3 Use a slotted spoon to remove the dried apricots from the pressure cooking pot, reserving the cooking water. Allow to cool for 20 minutes.

4 Place the cooked apricots in a blender jar or food processer and add 1 cup (235 ml) reserved cooking water. Blend until very smooth. (Add more water if needed to blend but use the minimum amount necessary.)

Tip

Check the packaging label and avoid buying dried apricots with sulfates, added sugars, artificial colors, or preservatives.

Dried Plum (Prune) Puree

Whether the label calls them "dried plums" or "prunes," these little fruits are the go-to food for keeping baby regular.

MAKES 1½ TO 2 CUPS (355 TO 475 ML).

1 cup (175 g) dried plums, approximately 25
1¾ cups (410 ml) water

1 In the pressure cooking pot, add the dried plums and water. Stir to ensure the plums are completely submerged. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 10 minutes cook time.

2 When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes, then finish with a quick pressure release. When the float valve drops, carefully remove the lid.

3 Use a slotted spoon to remove the dried plums from the pressure cooking pot, reserving the cooking water. Allow to cool for 20 minutes.

4 Place the cooked plums in a blender jar or food processer and add 1 cup (235 ml) reserved cooking water. Blend until very smooth. (Add more water if needed to blend but use the minimum amount necessary.)

Tip

If your baby isn't a fan of prune puree, try mixing it with other fruit purees, such as Apple Puree (page 34). If your baby still won't take it, try the Dried Apricot Puree (page 35).

Nectarine Puree

We prefer nectarines to peaches just because we don't have to bother with the skins. With this recipe, you can blend the puree with the skins on.

MAKES 3 TO 4 CUPS (700 TO 946 ML).

8 large nectarines, halved and pitted

1 Place a steamer basket in the bottom of the pressure cooking pot and add 1 cup (235 ml) water. Place the nectarines inside the basket and lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 5 minutes cook time.

2 When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes, then finish with a quick pressure release. When the float valve drops, carefully remove the lid.

3 Remove the nectarines from the pressure cooking pot, reserving the cooking water. Allow to cool until comfortable to handle.

4 Place the steamed nectarines in a blender jar or food processer with 1 cup (235 ml) reserved cooking water. Blend until very smooth. (Very juicy nectarines will require less liquid. Add reserved cooking water if needed to blend but use the minimum amount necessary.)

Tip

When selecting nectarines, pick fruit that has a slight give. Nectarines are very easy to halve when they're ripe, but you may still need to use a knife to cut around the pit to remove it. If your nectarines aren't quite ripe enough, place them in a paper bag for a day or two to ripen.

Peach Puree

You can use white or yellow peaches with this recipe — white peaches are a little sweeter and less tart, while yellow peaches will result in a traditional golden puree.

MAKES 3 TO 4 CUPS (700 TO 946 ML).

8 large peaches, halved and pitted

1 Place a steamer basket in the bottom of the pressure cooking pot and add 1 cup (235 ml) water. Place the peaches inside the basket and lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 5 minutes cook time.

2 When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes, then finish with a quick pressure release. When the float valve drops, carefully remove the lid.

3 Remove the peaches from the cooking pot, reserving the cooking water. Allow to cool until comfortable to handle, then peel off the skins.

4 Place the steamed peaches in a blender jar or food processer and blend until very smooth. (Add reserved cooking water if needed to blend but use the minimum amount necessary. Very juicy peaches won't require any additional liquid; less ripe peaches may need up to ½ cup (120 ml).)

Tip

If you're using frozen peaches, use a 0-minute cook time and a quick pressure release. If your pressure cooker doesn't allow you to set your cook time for 0 minutes, set your pressure cooker for the minimum time possible and release the pressure as soon as the machine reaches pressure.

Pear Puree

Pears are a terrific first fruit for baby. Bartlett pears are a good choice for pear puree because they are soft, mild, and sweet, but you can use this recipe with any variety of pear.

5 large pears, peeled, cored, and quartered
½ cup (120 ml) water

1 Place the pear quarters and water in the pressure cooking pot. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 4 minutes cook time.

2 When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 5 minutes, then finish with a quick pressure release. When the float valve drops, carefully remove the lid. Allow to cool for 20 minutes.

3 Transfer the contents of the cooking pot to a blender jar or food processer and blend until very smooth. (Add water if needed to blend but use the minimum amount necessary.)

Tip

If your pears aren't sweet, you can substitute apple juice for the water. If your pears are very ripe, you may not need to cook them as long (or at all) — just puree them in a blender and serve.

Butternut Squash Puree

There's no need to remove the rind before you pressure cook! After pressure cooking, the softened rind is easy to cut away.

MAKES 3 TO 4 CUPS (700 TO 946 ML). MAKES 5 TO 6 CUPS (1.2 TO 1.4 L).

1 fresh butternut squash

1 Wash the butternut squash. Do not peel. Use a sharp knife to remove the ends, then cut the neck away from the body, and slice the neck into quarters. Cut the body in half and use a spoon to scrape out the seeds and stringy flesh. Cut each half of the body into quarters.

2 Place a trivet in the bottom of the pressure cooking pot and add 1 cup (235 ml) water. Carefully stack the butternut squash pieces on top. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 5 minutes cook time.

3 When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes, then finish with a quick pressure release. When the float valve drops, carefully remove the lid.

4 Remove the butternut squash from the cooking pot, reserving the cooking water. Allow to cool until comfortable to handle.

5 Use a knife to remove the rind from the butternut squash pieces and place the flesh in a blender jar or food processer. Add ½ cup (120 ml) reserved cooking water and blend until very smooth. (Add more water if needed to blend but use the minimum amount necessary.)

Tip

If you want to skip removing the rind, many grocery and warehouse stores sell pre-packaged fresh or frozen cubed butternut squash. Some stores sell the butternut squash in large 2-inch (5 cm) pieces; others come in much smaller ½-inch (1.3 cm) pieces. Place 1 cup (235 ml) water and a steamer basket in the bottom of the pressure cooking pot. Place 2 cups (280 g) frozen butternut squash chunks inside the basket. The cook time will depend on the size — for larger pieces, cook for 4 minutes; for smaller pieces, cook for 2 to 3 minutes. This yields about 1½ cups (210 g) squash.

Carrot Puree

Carrots are easy to digest and packed with fiber and antioxidants like vitamin A. Steaming carrots makes the nutrients even easier to digest, and their sweet flavor often makes them a hit with new eaters.

MAKES 2 TO 3 CUPS (475 ML TO 700 ML).

8 fresh carrots, peeled and cut into approximately 2-inch (5 cm) pieces

1 Place a steamer basket in the bottom of the pressure cooking pot and add 1 cup (235 ml) water. Place the carrots inside the basket. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 4 minutes cook time.

2 When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes, then finish with a quick pressure release. When the float valve drops carefully remove the lid.

3 Remove the carrots from the steamer basket, reserving the cooking water. Allow to cool for 20 minutes.

4 Place the steamed carrots in a blender jar or food processer. Add ¾ cup (175 ml) reserved cooking water and blend until very smooth. (Add more water if needed to blend but use the minimum amount necessary.)

Tip

If you're in a hurry, you can use prepackaged peeled carrots, baby carrots, or frozen carrots. If you're using frozen carrots, use 2 cups (260 g) frozen carrots, a 3-minute cook time, and a quick pressure release.

Green Bean Puree

Rich in vitamin A and fiber, green beans are a nutritious addition to a baby's diet.

MAKES 1½ CUPS (355 ML).

4 cups (400 g) fresh green beans, ends trimmed

1 Place a steamer basket in the bottom of the pressure cooking pot and add 1 cup (235 ml) water. Place the green beans inside the basket. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 4 minutes cook time.

2 When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes, then finish with a quick pressure release. When the float valve drops, carefully remove the lid.

3 Remove the green beans from the steamer basket, reserving the cooking water. Allow to cool for 20 minutes.

4 Place the steamed green beans in a blender jar or food processer. Add ½ cup (120 ml) reserved cooking water and blend until very smooth. (Add more water if needed to blend but use the minimum amount necessary.)

Tip

Frozen fruits and vegetables are often picked at the peak of freshness, so they are a great option for making baby foods. We often prefer using frozen green beans to skip washing and trimming. If you're using frozen green beans, use 3 cups (372 g) frozen green beans, a 3-minute cook time, and a quick pressure release.

Pea Puree

Peas make a wonderful first green vegetable for baby — they're on the sweeter side, a good source of fiber, and have a bright green color. Because frozen peas are already shelled and taste great year-round, we generally cook from frozen; however, you can make purees with fresh shelled peas with no change to the cook time.

MAKES 1½ CUPS (355 ML).

2 cups shelled peas (300 g), fresh or (260 g) frozen

1 Place a steamer basket in the bottom of the pressure cooking pot and add 1 cup (235 ml) water. Place the peas inside the basket. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 2 minutes cook time.

2 When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Use a quick pressure release. When the float valve drops, carefully remove the lid.

3 Remove the peas from the steamer basket, reserving the cooking water. Allow to cool for 20 minutes.

4 Place the steamed peas in a blender jar or food processer. Add ¾ cup (175 ml) reserved cooking water and blend until very smooth. (Add more water if needed to blend but use the minimum amount necessary.)

Tip

Sometimes the outer "skin" of the peas won't puree smooth; if you wish to remove them from the puree before serving, pass them through a fine-mesh sieve.

Spaghetti Squash Puree

This squash is easy to cook in the pressure cooker. It has a mild flavor and a beautiful golden color when pureed.

MAKES ABOUT 4 CUPS (946 ML).

1 fresh spaghetti squash (about 2 pounds, or 900 g)

1 Wash the spaghetti squash. Do not peel. Use a sharp knife to remove the stem end of the squash, then cut the squash in half vertically, and remove the seeds with a spoon.

2 Place a trivet in the bottom of the pressure cooking pot and add 1 cup (235 ml) water. Carefully place the spaghetti squash pieces on top. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 8 minutes cook time.

3 When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 2 minutes, then finish with a quick pressure release. When the float valve drops, carefully remove the lid.

4 Remove the spaghetti squash from the cooking pot, reserving the cooking water. Allow to cool until comfortable to handle, then remove the skin.

5 Place the flesh in a blender jar or food processer. Add ¾ cup (175 ml) reserved cooking water and blend until very smooth. (Add more water if needed to blend but use the minimum amount necessary.)

Tip

When baby is a bit bigger, rather than making a puree, serve this squash as a replacement spaghetti. Cool until comfortable to handle, then use a fork to scrape the strands of "spaghetti" from the skin. We like to serve this when the adults are eating spaghetti — mix the spaghetti squash, some spaghetti pieces, and a little sauce.

Sweet Potato Puree

Here are two ways for your baby to enjoy nutritious sweet potato: one for when they are just getting started with solid foods, and one for when they are ready for a sweet but healthy treat.

2 large sweet potatoes

1 Peel the sweet potatoes. Cut in half lengthwise and cut into ¼ -inch (6 mm) slices. Place a trivet in the bottom of the pressure cooking pot and add 1 cup (235 ml) water. Place the sweet potato slices on the trivet. Lock the lid in place. Select High Pressure and 15 minutes cook time.

2 When the cook time ends, turn off the pressure cooker. Let the pressure release naturally for 10 minutes, then finish with a quick pressure release. When the float valve drops, carefully remove the lid.

3 Remove the sweet potatoes from the pressure cooking pot, reserving the cooking water. Allow to cool for 20 minutes.

4 Place the cooled sweet potatoes in a blender jar or food processer and add ½ to ¾ cup (120 to 175 ml) reserved cooking water. Blend until very smooth. (Add more water if needed to blend but use the minimum amount necessary to get to your preferred consistency.)

(Continues…)


Excerpted from "Instant Pot Baby Food & Toddler Food Cookbook"
by .
Copyright © 2019 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc..
Excerpted by permission of The Quarto Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Authors' Note 6

Introduction

Baby Feeding Basics 7

Toddler Feeding Basics 19

Pressure Cooking Essentials 23

Part 1 Baby Food

Chapter 1 First Fruits and Vegetables 33

Chapter 2 Grains and Legumes 51

Chapter 3 Fruit and Vegetable Blends 65

Chapter 4 Meats and Dinners for Babies 85

Chapter 5 Desserts for a First Birthday Celebration 99

Part 2 Toddler Food

Chapter 6 Breakfasts for Toddlers 107

Chapter 7 Lunches for Toddlers 123

Chapter 8 Dinners for Toddlers 143

Chapter 9 Toddler-Friendly Desserts 167

Acknowledgments 172

About the Authors 173

Index 174

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