Well-Preserved: Recipes and Techniques for Putting Up Small Batches of Seasonal Foods

Well-Preserved: Recipes and Techniques for Putting Up Small Batches of Seasonal Foods

by Eugenia Bone

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780307885807
Publisher: Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale
Publication date: 10/27/2010
Sold by: Random House
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 224
File size: 19 MB
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About the Author

Eugenia Bone’s writing has appeared in the New York Times, The Denver Post, Saveur, Food & Wine, and The National Lampoon, among other publications.  She is the author of Mycophilia, hailed by The New York Times as “A delicious, suprising and dizzyingly informative book,” Well-Preserved: Recipes and Techniques for Putting up Small Batches of Seasonal Food and The Kitchen Ecosystem: Integrating Recipes to Create Delicious Meals. She lives in New York City and Colorado.

Read an Excerpt

Cherries in Wine
Makes 4 pints


You know summer has finally arrived when the cherries start to come in. The season is short, so in the months that follow I am always grateful that I have taken the time to put some up. These preserves are great used in both savory and sweet dishes. I love having them on hand for unexpected company. All I have to do is dump 1⁄2 cup into a wineglass and top with whipped cream for a surprisingly elegant dessert. Cherries have high acidity, as do wine and orange juice, making this a safe product for water bath processing. I use an olive pitter to pit the cherries.

• 2 quarts red wine
• 2 cups sugar
• 2 cups orange juice
• 24 whole cloves
• Sixteen 3-inch strips orange zest
• 4 pounds Bing cherries, pitted (about 8 cups)


Place the wine, sugar, orange juice, cloves, and orange zest in a medium pot. Bring to a low boil over medium heat, stirring all the while to dissolve the sugar and ensure it doesn’t burn.

Have ready 4 scalded pint jars and their bands. (To scald, simply dip the jars in boiling water. You don’t need to sterilize the jars, as you will be processing them for over 10 minutes.) Simmer new lids in a small pan of hot water to soften the rubberized flange.

Add the cherries to the wine and simmer for 10 minutes, until they are soft but not collapsed looking. Remove the cherries with a slotted spoon and ladle them into the hot jars.

Reduce the wine mixture remaining in the pot over medium-low heat to about half its volume, about 10 minutes. It will be rather viscous. Strain the wine mixture and pour over the cherries in the jars, leaving 1⁄2 to 3⁄4 inch of headspace.

Wipe the rims, set on the lids, and screw on the bands fingertip tight. Place the jars in a big pot with a rack in the bottom and add enough water to cover the jars by 3 inches. Bring to a boil over high heat, then lower the heat to medium and gently boil the jars for 20 minutes. Turn off the heat, allow the jars to rest in the water for 5 minutes, and then remove. Allow the jars to cool, untouched, for 4 to 6 hours. Check the seals and store in a cool, dry place for up to a year. Refrigerate after opening.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Well-Preserved: Recipes and Techniques for Putting up Small Batches of Seasonal Foods 2.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Dele2451 More than 1 year ago
We read and hear so much these days about the need to eat healthier, reduce waste and control our spending and this is the perfect book to help us do all three. I like way this selection combines both canning instructions and recipes for using those canned goods once you've put them up. I also appreciate the no-nonsense and practical pros and cons the author presents regarding various equipment available on the market and the different styles of canning. We are avid gardeners, but have only put up pickles and salsa in the past. With Eugenia's help, we hope to expand our pantry quite a bit come harvest time.
pdever on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Really good book for anyone who wants to start "putting food by". The small batch angle makes beginning less daunting. The recipes are good, and the author's style is straightforward and approachable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I liked the concept of this book, including the recipes for using what you've canned. But the canned items are not your run of the mill canning items. So you need the recipes in order to use the items you can! Examples of the canned items are green olive tempenade, preserved meyer lemons, cherries in wine, figs in brandy, etc. Not things I was looking to "put up.". But the recipes do look like they will take your cooking to the next level, if you are a foodie and you choose to spend the time creating these canned items just so that you can use them in a few recipes. I probably would have returned the nook book, but I didn't examine it well enough before my 14 day window passed.
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