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The Afghan
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The Afghan

3.7 51
by Frederick Forsyth
 

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When British and American intelligence discover an al Qaeda operation in the works, they enlist undercover imposter Colonel Mike Martin to pass himself off as Taliban commander Izmat Khan. But nothing prepares Martin for the dark and shifting world into which he is about to enter-or the terrible things he will find there.

Overview

When British and American intelligence discover an al Qaeda operation in the works, they enlist undercover imposter Colonel Mike Martin to pass himself off as Taliban commander Izmat Khan. But nothing prepares Martin for the dark and shifting world into which he is about to enter-or the terrible things he will find there.

Editorial Reviews

This espionage novel is ripped from the headlines. Drawing on real events connected with the July 2005 London subway bombing, The Afghan conjures up a pulse-raising tale of plots and counter-plots. When leaders of the United States and the United Kingdom uncover the outlines of a massive al Qaeda attack plan, they attempt a risky substitution: Colonel Mike Martin, a resourceful British operative, is sent into the Taliban hornet nest to ferret out the details of the terrorist assault.
Library Journal
American and British intelligence services discover that al Qaeda is planning something major and horrific that will likely occur somewhere in the United States. However, since neither country has operatives on the inside, they have no idea what or where. Enter retired British army Col. Mike Martin, who first appeared in Forsyth's The Fist of God. Martin's job is to assume the identity of an imprisoned Taliban member and infiltrate al Qaeda. This is plausible because he is lean, dark-complexioned, of part-Indian descent, and was raised in Iran. Martin becomes the titular Afghan and begins a dangerous and frightening journey toward discovering what appalling act the terrorists are planning and putting a stop to it. Typical of Forsyth's work (e.g., The Day of the Jackal and Avenger), this is a tense story of technology vs. evil, the latter in this case a mind-numbing degree of fanaticism. Even though it starts slowly, it builds to an exciting climax that makes the read well worth it. Recommended. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 5/15/06.]-Robert Conroy, Warren, MI Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The Forsyth Formula, al-Qaeda version: A sort of post-9/11 apocalyptic western, this thriller pits White Guys against Black Turbans, the daring forces of freedom versus the jihadi doers of evil. Should Hasbro ever decide it needs a new G.I. Joe, Mike Martin's their man. The latest action figure from the Forsyth franchise (Avenger, 2003, etc.), he's a craggy Scot summoned from a wee bit of rest and relaxation at his Hampshire retreat back into the endless global fray. The listening department of Pakistan's Counter-Terrorism Center has, through cell-phone surveillance, unearthed a plot. One of Osama bin Laden's financiers has already, clutching his laptop, hurled himself from a balustrade to protect the plans. Hi-tech British cunning retrieves the info, which reveals schemes for "Al Isra," the biggest potential attack yet. To penetrate al-Qaeda, U.K./U.S. intelligence makes a mole of Martin, passing him off as Izmat Khan, ex-Taliban bigwig serving time in Gitmo. Mirror images of each other, the men are archetypal warriors, Khan a stoic Afghan outraged by the Russian invasion of his country and conned by desperation into bin Laden's service, Martin a 25-year veteran of killing missions-the Falklands, the Balkans, the Middle East. Plus, passing for Khan is easy for multilingual Martin, son of an oil-company executive stationed in Iraq. He even looks the part: "olive-skinned, black-haired and eyed, lean and very hard of physique." Martin's mission earns him martyrdom, but only after all kinds of derring-do involving a ship called The Countess of Richmond, characters screaming "Eject, eject!" and a cameo appearance by John Negroponte. Gun-club porn-packed with stodgily accurate descriptions ofweapons and acronymic slang. Hardly subtle, just bang-bang galore. First printing of 250,000

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780451221834
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/07/2007
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
400
Sales rank:
340,753
Product dimensions:
4.20(w) x 7.50(h) x 1.07(d)
Age Range:
18 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Frederick Forsyth is the author of fourteen novels and short story collections, from 1971's The Day of the Jackal to 2003's Avenger. A former pilot and print and television reporter, he has had five movies made from his works, and a television miniseries.

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The Afghan 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 51 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
books-r-me More than 1 year ago
i don't know where this man gets his info but he's done his homework again. i very informative 'text' written in novel form about the history and culture of the mideast mixing with the west. character development was a bit soddened with perhaps too much background info but entertaining, nonetheless. this is a heavy subject not to be taken lightly. in drawing parallels, not intended by the author, one can see the mismatched arab cultures, vastness of religion and translations of the holy koran - not too dissimilar to the holy bible of christianity and the terrible things christians did to each other and the outsiders not too far ago. the christians did less than holy things to others - just like what's happening with islam today. a definite read - especially to those who think they know (but do not - really!).
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It took a couple of chapters to get "into" the story and where it was going. It likely provided some insight into the anonomous and edicated life of the Navy Selas and was a good plot and story.
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ForsythFan More than 1 year ago
Forsyth became the permier action/adventure writer with "Day of the Jackel" and followed it up with the exciting "Odessa File." He's been coasting since then. This title shows his penchant for detail without bogging the story line down, but it lacks the tension of those two works. You never connect with the characters and the ending is a let down.
Springer1911-A1 More than 1 year ago
This book was filled with very believable characters whit very human flaws. The book is filled with suspence because the antaginist and portaginist both are not super humans. And it show that all the high-tech support is only as good as the person in control. This stor goes int detail how ruthless the bad guys can be and in the blink of an eye, they could win.
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rmattos More than 1 year ago
In yet another wonderful book, Mr. Forsyth covers international terrorism at its best. In this book, British and American intelligence agencies receive a terrible message: an Al-Qaeda strike is imminent. But they have no clue when, where and who will cause the strike. There is no clear clue. Security authorities do not have sources of information inside Osama bin Laden's organization. It is impossible to infiltrate someone from the western hemisphere, unless... Izmat Khan is an afghan and he is a high official from the Taliban. He has been held at Guantanamo prison for five years. Colonel Mike Martin is a veteran with 25 year experience at the most dangerous war places in the world. He is a British official, born and raised in Iraq. In a try to avoid the attack, the intelligence services will try what nobody ever thought about doing: they will try to make Mike Martin impersonate Izmat Khan. If ou are picky, you will find minor flaws on how Mike is examined by the Taliban guys to find out if he really is Izmat or if he is lying... but generally speaking, this is another masterpiece from the master of suspense. If you like to read in the edge of your seat, this is the book you cannot miss in your permanent library. It took me around 13 hours to read this book. I give it a 5 stars.
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