Blue Remembered Earth (Poseidon's Children Series #1)

Blue Remembered Earth (Poseidon's Children Series #1)

4.2 33
by Alastair Reynolds
     
 

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One hundred and fifty years from now, Africa has become the world’s dominant technological and economic power. Crime, war, disease and poverty have been practically eliminated. The Moon and Mars are settled, and colonies stretch all the way out to the edge of the solar system. And Ocular, the largest scientific instrument in history, is about to make an

Overview

One hundred and fifty years from now, Africa has become the world’s dominant technological and economic power. Crime, war, disease and poverty have been practically eliminated. The Moon and Mars are settled, and colonies stretch all the way out to the edge of the solar system. And Ocular, the largest scientific instrument in history, is about to make an epochal discovery…
 
Geoffrey Akinya wants only one thing: to be left in peace, so that he can continue his long-running studies into the elephants of the Amboseli basin. But Geoffrey’s family, which controls the vast Akinya business empire, has other plans for him. After the death of his grandmother Eunice—the erstwhile space explorer and entrepreneur—something awkward has come to light on the Moon, so Geoffrey is dispatched there to ensure the family name remains untarnished.
 
But the secrets Eunice died with are about to be revealed—secrets that could change everything...or tear this near utopia apart.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Engrossing…Blue Remembered Earth is, ultimately, a collection of conflicting ‘isms’: individualism, collectivism, romanticism, capitalism, expansionism, escapism. The ability to integrate such competing notions into a stable narrative speaks to the ideological power of the best SF; it also demonstrates Reynolds’s genre mastery….More importantly, the projected series—and the work Reynolds has yet to produce—will tell us much about the state of SF in the early twenty-first century.”—Los Angeles Review of Books
 
“Reynolds both develops a richly detailed portrait of a resurgent, postapocalyptic Earth society and economy, and leaves himself plenty of room to expand his narrative space exponentially…If Reynolds can keep this up—and there’s enough planted here for future volumes to already suggest that he can—he might have one of the most enjoyable series of the still-young decade.”—Locus
 
“As my number one SF writer of the ’00s, any novel or story by Alastair Reynolds is a must...As speculation about a mid 2100s Earth and nearby solar system, Blue Remembered Earth is simply unrivaled in recent SF and if only for that and the novel is a top 25 of mine…A compulsive read that you do not want to put down…If you want to understand why SF at its best is still the most interesting form of literature today, Blue Remembered Earth [is the place] to go.”—Fantasy Book Critic
Publishers Weekly
Reynolds (Terminal World) cements his status as one of the preeminent writers of hard SF with this gripping and intelligent kickoff to the three-book Poseidon’s Children sequence. It’s 2161, and Africa is the Earth’s “dominant economic and technological” power. Geoffrey Akinya has used major scientific advances to enhance his research into elephant intelligence, preparing to mind-meld with wild pachyderms. His studies are interrupted by the death of his 131-year-old grandmother Eunice, which catalyzes events that takes the biologist to the Moon and beyond to decipher a series of clues Eunice left behind. Akinya’s quest further enmeshes him in some very complicated family dynamics. The futuristic science, which includes expansions of virtual reality and a convenient mode of travel from Earth to the Moon, is plausibly conveyed. Beyond that, Reynolds’s creative imagination uses current and speculative science and technology as the underlying structure for a thoughtful exploration of humanity’s place in the universe. Agent: Robert Kirby, United Agents. (June)
Library Journal
In the 22nd century, Africa leads the world in economics and technology, while most people live long, disease- and hunger-free lives. Humanity has expanded to the moon, Mars, and beyond. The grandchildren of the late Eunice Akinya, matriarch of the powerful Akinya family, puzzle over her curious legacy and her possible connection to a cult dedicated to spreading all life forms throughout the known universe. As Geoffrey Akinya, who has devoted his life to the study of elephants in the Amboseli Basin, learns more, he realizes that Eunice involved herself in matters that could potentially tear the universe apart. The author of Revelation Space and Terminal World launches a series following one family into the far future, as the human journey into space extends past the solar system into the further reaches of the galaxy. Reynolds combines hard science with believable characters and a strong plot to deliver his vision of a future in the stars. VERDICT This dynastic series opener deals with the popular topics of space travel and colonization of other planets in a style that should appeal to fans of David Brin and Kim Stanley Robinson.
Kirkus Reviews
First volume of a new planet-hopping series from the author of Terminal World (2010). By the middle of the next century, Africa is the dominant technological and economic power (a provocative notion, though Reynolds declines to show us how this came to be), wars and poverty have vanished, and violence is impossible: Thanks to mandatory neural implants, anybody that so much as attempts it gets zapped with an incapacitating migraine. Geoffrey, scion of the rich and powerful Akinya clan, studies elephants in the hope of achieving a full mind-meld with them. Recently, Eunice, Geoffrey's grandmother, a brilliant researcher who spent the latter part of her long life as a recluse aboard an orbiting space station, died, having left a MacGuffin somewhere in the solar system and a series of teasing clues to its location. Geoffrey's cousins, ruthless businessmen Hector and Lucas, prefer the MacGuffin remain undiscovered or, better, destroyed; still, they send Geoffrey up to the moon to investigate the first clue. Geoffrey, despite strict instructions from Hector and Lucas not to, can't help enlisting his sister, Sunday, to help with the search. Thus the plot--find the MacGuffin, get the grand tour--uncomfortably resembles that of Kim Stanley Robinson's recent 2312, for which we probably have Dan Brown to thank. The backdrop sparkles with human merfolk and bioengineering, artificial intelligences or "artilects," "quangled" (quantum-entangled) mind-to-mind conversations and a whirl of experimental habitats and societies. The most lifelike character, Eunice, is a multipartite computer reconstruction, even though her MacGuffin turns up in the place most of us would look first, never mind the red herrings. Along the way, Reynolds tosses out and then casually abandons dozens more astonishing concepts and developments. Readers hoping for adventures in the mind-boggling fashion of Revelation Space may emerge dissatisfied but certainly not deterred.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780425256169
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/28/2013
Series:
Poseidon's Children Series, #1
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
576
Sales rank:
189,602
Product dimensions:
4.10(w) x 6.50(h) x 1.40(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
“Engrossing…Blue Remembered Earth is, ultimately, a collection of conflicting ‘isms’: individualism, collectivism, romanticism, capitalism, expansionism, escapism. The ability to integrate such competing notions into a stable narrative speaks to the ideological power of the best SF; it also demonstrates Reynolds’s genre mastery….More importantly, the projected series—and the work Reynolds has yet to produce—will tell us much about the state of SF in the early twenty-first century.”—Los Angeles Review of Books
 
“Reynolds both develops a richly detailed portrait of a resurgent, postapocalyptic Earth society and economy, and leaves himself plenty of room to expand his narrative space exponentially…If Reynolds can keep this up—and there’s enough planted here for future volumes to already suggest that he can—he might have one of the most enjoyable series of the still-young decade.”—Locus
 
“As my number one SF writer of the ’00s, any novel or story by Alastair Reynolds is a must...As speculation about a mid 2100s Earth and nearby solar system, Blue Remembered Earth is simply unrivaled in recent SF and if only for that and the novel is a top 25 of mine…A compulsive read that you do not want to put down…If you want to understand why SF at its best is still the most interesting form of literature today, Blue Remembered Earth [is the place] to go.”—Fantasy Book Critic

Meet the Author

Alastair Reynolds was born in Wales in 1966. He has a PhD in astronomy. From 1991 to 2007, he lived in the Netherlands, where he was employed by the European Space Agency as an astrophysicist. He is now a full-time writer and lives in South Wales with his wife, Josette.

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Blue Remembered Earth 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
NotReallyMe More than 1 year ago
A long wait for only a fair story. Not up to the level of Reynold's previous books. The science, both real and imagined are mostly believable and entertaining. The "pan" concept is over the top. Wishful thinking maybe? This is obviously part of a new series. Unfortunately I'm torn between the hope that the next chapter is better, or the hope that he abandons it for a new theme.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book has some of the author's classic storytelling elements but just doesn't measure up to his more creative works. I found it interesting but not terribly clever or surprising. If you are a loyal follower of AR, it is still worth the read.
thaloonWL More than 1 year ago
Like all of his books, Reynolds keeps you interested and develops great stories. I highly recommend this one.
Jw0 More than 1 year ago
Excellent! The best scifi novel that I have read in the past year. The near future technology that Reynolds extrapolates from current tech and research had me wanting to live in his world. I will be eagerly Waiting for the sequel.
DavGrn More than 1 year ago
Just finished this and thought it was a good read.
delfera More than 1 year ago
His best yet. Still intelligent and provoking, but with a fun plot. Reynolds reaches his best synthesis of character development, action and speculation in this thoughtful and enjoyable read.
Luv2Nuk More than 1 year ago
Reading the book was like being a participant on this fantistical journey. Can't wait for the next installment!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While AR has a mastery of the written word, I felt that this novel didn't shine as his past endeavors have. The characters are remarkably shallow, maintaining an almost immature and childish bent throughout the story. There was a decent amount of hard "sci", but a distinct lack of substantial "fi". My overall review is an "eh" for effort.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really want to read what happens next
jth90c More than 1 year ago
I'm writing this review of the BN spam email generator, not the book. I'd read a laundry list if it were written by Alastair Reynolds - which is why I pre-ordered this book. But if Barnes and Nobel wants to send me an email asking me to review my purchase, and if I haven't read the book (since it won't show up on my nook until June 5th) then they must want me to review their automatic email system that evidently wants folks to comment on their purchases to generate phony reviews on their website. Listen, BN. I like my nook, I like being able to read books on it, and I don't feel the need to chat up my latest purchase just so you can have more filler for your website. I certainly don't need more email from you - you couldn't target my reading taste if you actually knew me, so don't even try. I'll buy books I want to read, and you and the authors will benefit. Now - how about those Dodgers?
jblangworthy 7 months ago
A very engrossing read about life in the 22nd century without engaging any critical notion about what's possible or my sense of disbelief. Action begins slowly, ramps up to a sustained climax and a satisfying denouement. I will be reading more by Allistair Reynolds.
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