Boy Who Wouldn't Share
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Boy Who Wouldn't Share

5.0 2
by Mike Reiss, David Catrow
     
 

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Edward has oodles of toys but doesn't share any of them with his little sister, Claire. She cannot ride his rocking horse, hug his teddy bear, or even think about touching his Slinky.

"They're mine!"

he says. That is, until one day when Edward finds himself stuck under his enormous pile of toys and can't move! With a little help from an unlikely ally,

Overview

Edward has oodles of toys but doesn't share any of them with his little sister, Claire. She cannot ride his rocking horse, hug his teddy bear, or even think about touching his Slinky.

"They're mine!"

he says. That is, until one day when Edward finds himself stuck under his enormous pile of toys and can't move! With a little help from an unlikely ally, he learns that if he can share with others, they'll share right back with him.

Mike Reiss's wickedly funny verse and David Catrow's remarkable gift for comic illustration make this one book you'll want to share—again and again!

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1- Reiss and Catrow team up again for another humorous picture book. Edward, a "frightful boy," will not share any toys with his younger sister. When she touches something, he cries, "IT'S MINE. MINE. MINE!" Overcome by greed, he gets stuck in his tangle of toys and misses the opportunity for homemade fudge. Claire, not one to hold grudges, helps free her brother and shares her chocolate. After Edward apologizes profusely, the siblings spend the day playing happily. The rhyming text is pleasant but flawed. Edward's dramatic character shift is hard to believe, and one wonders why he doesn't shout "help" when his mother is nearby. Catrow's colorful, amusing illustrations are the highlight here. With every viewing, readers see additional delightful details, such as a blow-up Frankenstein doll drinking tea from a dainty cup and a cat whose stripes match the easy chair. The varying perspectives of the children and the toys add to the fun. Edward's sour, grumpy expressions are exaggerated and comical; children learning to share will belly laugh even as they see a reflection of themselves. Overall, this would be a good addition to early childhood collections.-Barbara Katz, Parish Episcopal School, Dallas, TX

Kirkus Reviews
Even Catrow's flamboyantly over-the-top art can't completely rescue this superficial cautionary tale from the heap of mediocre, heavy-handed takes on the theme. Bulbous, sour-faced Edward resolutely guards his heaping pile of toys from little sister Claire (who looks remarkably like Cindy Lou Who in both posture and visage)-"IT'S MINE. MINE. MINE!" Then Mom comes in with a plate of fudge, and so buried is he in the stack that she passes it all to Claire. Edward instantly changes his tune: " ‘Share my toys,' said Edward. ‘Take them. / Hold them! Hug them! You can break them!' " Edward gets some fudge, and off the two go to play in happy harmony thereafter. Right. Young readers will enjoy picking Edward's toys, which range from a wizard's hat and a blow-up, life-size Frankenstein to a "Yeti in a Can," out of the jumble, but his obviously fudge-driven remorse is entirely too sudden and heartfelt to be credible. Kids will relish the illustrations and get a guffaw or two, though, and that can't be all bad. (Picture book. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060591328
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/27/2008
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
213,518
Product dimensions:
10.22(w) x 10.28(h) x 0.35(d)
Lexile:
AD350L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Mike Reiss is a former head writer for The Simpsons, a show for which he has won four Emmy awards. He is a graduate of Harvard University, where he served as president of The Harvard Lampoon, and currently lives in Los Angeles, California. His other books for children include How Murray Saved Christmas, Santa Claustrophobia, and The Boy Who Looked Like Lincoln, all illustrated by David Catrow.

David Catrow is the national bestselling illustrator of I Ain't Gonna Paint No More by Karen Beaumont. He and Mike Reiss have collaborated before with the unforgettable books How Murray Saved Christmas, Santa Claustrophobia, and The Boy Who Looked Like Lincoln. David Catrow lives in Springfield, Ohio, where he is still waiting for Santa to deliver the wildebeest he's had on his Christmas list since 1964.

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Boy Who Wouldn't Share 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What a great book! This is probably the most requested book at bedtime. My 3 year old loves this book and because of the wonderful rhyming, has most of it memorized. A plus for him starting to read on his own someday. I HIGHLY recommend this book. Cute story, just the right length and has a good message.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago