The Breakup Bible

The Breakup Bible

4.2 60
by Melissa Kantor
     
 

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Jen Lewis is having a great junior year. She is the features editor of the school paper, and she's dating Max Brown, the paper's editor-in-chief. Everything is perfect-that is, until Max says, "Maybe it would be better if we were just friends." In shock and total denial, Jen wonders how she is going to deal with the pain of seeing Max in school every day. Her misery… See more details below

Overview

Jen Lewis is having a great junior year. She is the features editor of the school paper, and she's dating Max Brown, the paper's editor-in-chief. Everything is perfect-that is, until Max says, "Maybe it would be better if we were just friends." In shock and total denial, Jen wonders how she is going to deal with the pain of seeing Max in school every day. Her misery only intensifies when her grandmother gives her a book that she heard about on the radio. Dr. Emerson's The Breakup Bible claims that "there's no reason a woman can't get over a breakup very quickly if she'll just follow a few basic commandments." Jen is doubtful. What does Dr. Emerson know about her and Max? In a send-up to the scores of dating books on the market, Melissa Kantor's The Breakup Bible tackles the aftermath of a high school romance with her trademark honesty, humor, and wit.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Jen is crushed when her boyfriend tells her "it would be better if we were just friends." Making matters worse, she catches him kissing another girl from the school paper, where she also works. Jen cannot sleep, cries constantly and thinks she "could actually die of heartache." Even with supportive friends and family-and opportunities to advance her journalism career-it takes time to move on. Kantor (Confessions of a Not It Girl) successfully juggles several storylines, including Jen's work on a controversial article about race relations at school, her mother's attempt at romance after years on the sidelines and even a fun first date for Jen with a boy who bravely takes her salsa dancing. These threads make Jen's world seem very real and reflect her growing sense of self. Readers may not know what to make of the actual self-help book Jen's grandmother buys her (called The Breakup Bible); full of clichés (such as "A fabulous, foxy lady such as yourself knows when it's time to say good riddance to bad rubbish!), the cheesy book seems to help Jen at times, but ultimately ends up in the trash. Jen goes through much of the book thinking "I'm so sad, I'm so sad, I'm so sad," which may overwhelm readers, but in the end, they will likely be convinced both of Jen's readiness to move on and of her ability to see the good and the bad in her first romance. Ages 12-up. (May)

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VOYA - Geri Dioro
Jennifer's boyfriend Max breaks up with her, telling her that they would be better as "just friends." Her family is loving but unhelpful, her friends are fiercely protective, and her grandmother offers a self-help book titled The Breakup Bible. Jennifer tries to follow the book's advice, but it hinders more than helps. A heartbroken Jennifer feels that no one truly understands her pain. Jennifer's life is not all misery, however. She is a smart girl with plenty of good opportunities. There is a chance at a summer internship at the New York Times; the editor position at her school newspaper will be hers next year; she makes new friends by writing an investigative story about race relations at her school; and her father and his loving boyfriend set her up on a wonderful blind date. Unsurprisingly by the end of the story, Jennifer learns that breakups can be difficult, but one will survive and thrive by being one's own person and moving on. The book is like cotton candy: sweet, light, gone fast, and easily forgettable. There are several scenes of casual teen drinking that kept bringing this reviewer up short. Jennifer and her friends are juniors in high school but they drink at parties, at family gatherings, and out at a restaurant. Not that this book needs to be a morality play, but the characters drink in a very blase manner that was a bit unsettling. Overall it is a frothy, insubstantial additional purchase.
VOYA - Lucy Freeman
Relaxing in a pool chair on a summer day? The Breakup Bible is perfect for you. In the mood for some serious literature? Not so much. The book is cute and fun, but not something you'll be cracking open again soon. Kantor's characters have little depth and never stray far from stereotypical high schoolers. All there is to be found here is an overplayed and easily forgettable love story.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781423140986
Publisher:
Disney Press
Publication date:
02/23/2010
Sold by:
DISNEY PUBLISHING WORLDWIDE -EBKS
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
272,350
File size:
0 MB
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

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