The Brutal Telling (Chief Inspector Gamache Series #5)

The Brutal Telling (Chief Inspector Gamache Series #5)

3.9 190
by Louise Penny
     
 

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Chaos is coming, old son.



With those words the peace of Three Pines is shattered. Everybody goes to Olivier's Bistro--including a stranger whose murdered body is found on the floor. When Chief Inspector Gamache is called to investigate, he is dismayed to discover that Olivier's story is full of holes. Why are his fingerprints

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Overview

Chaos is coming, old son.



With those words the peace of Three Pines is shattered. Everybody goes to Olivier's Bistro--including a stranger whose murdered body is found on the floor. When Chief Inspector Gamache is called to investigate, he is dismayed to discover that Olivier's story is full of holes. Why are his fingerprints all over the cabin that's uncovered deep in the wilderness, with priceless antiques and the dead man's blood? And what other secrets and layers of lies are buried in the seemingly idyllic village?

Gamache follows a trail of clues and treasures--from first editions of Charlotte's Web and Jane Eyre to a spiderweb with a word mysteriously woven in it--into the woods and across the continent, before returning to Three Pines to confront the truth and the final, brutal telling.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Penny has been compared to Agatha Christie, [but] it sells her short.”
Booklist (starred review)

“An intricate, almost mythic plot, superb characters, and rich, dark humor.”
People

“Magic . . . [with] an elegance and depth not often seen.”
The New York Times Book Review

“If you don't give your heart to Gamache, you may have no heart to give.”
Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“A treat for the mind and a lesson for the soul, this is a novel full of surprises.”
Richmond Times-Dispatch

“It's Penny's most ambitious novel to date, adding much to our knowledge of the continuing characters and creating a framework of myth that lends structure to the tale…
eloquent prose and amazingly complex characters.”
Denver Post

“In this fifth installment of Louise Penny's wonderful series, she keeps things fresh by making a beloved member of her core cast, Olivier Brule, a suspect in the death of a recluse found dead on the floor of Olivier's own bistro… Penny blends poetry, ciphers and history in all its ‘brutal telling’ with the usual mouthwatering bistro meals and the quirky villagers to continue one of the best series out there today.”
Charlotte Observer

“If you've yet to meet the fascinating Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, who has starred in four previous novels, this book is a good place to start. The plot, like the man, is intelligent and never boring. Penny has crafted another complex mystery with twists at every turn of the page.”
RT Book Magazine

“As in her previous four Inspector Gamache mysteries, Penny grafts a suspenseful whodunit onto her sketch of the whims and mores of Three Pines’ small population.”
Quill and Quire

“…little treasures are scattered throughout THE BRUTAL TELLING and all the other books as well. I dare anyone to say that this isn’t literary fiction.
But even more, this is poetry.”
Mystery News

“Though Gamache is undeniably the focus, Penny continues to develop her growing cast of supporting characters, including newcomers Marc and Dominique Gilbert, who are converting an old house-the site of two murders-into a spa. Readers keen for another glimpse into the life of Three Pines will be well rewarded.”
Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Having won numerous mystery prizes, including the prestigious Arthur Ellis and Anthony awards for her debut, Still Life, Canadian author Penny has only gotten better with each succeeding novel. Her fifth in the series is the finest of all. Featuring series protagonist Chief Inspector Gamache, this literary mystery explores the ways in which sins of the past have a way of resurrecting themselves, wreaking havoc upon their perpetrators, and, unfortunately, the innocent. Thus, when a hermit is slain in the woods near an isolated village in rural Quebec, secrets surface, unmasking characters who have adopted benign personae to conceal their questionable past deeds. Fortunately, sagacious Gamache possesses the acumen to peel away the layers of deceit and to expose the truth. This superb novel will appeal to readers who enjoy sophisticated literary mysteries in the tradition of Donna Leon.”
—Library Journal (starred review)

A Selection of Barnes & Noble Recommends
The village in Quebec where Louise Penny’s Chief Inspector Gamache novels are set is home to a bistro, a bookstore, a bed-and- breakfast, and a boulangerie. Tantalizing aromas seem to waft from every room, and friendship warms the homes of the eccentric collection of people that populates the town, a potpourri of escaping urbanites, artists, carpenters, and an outlandish poet with a pet duck.

And yet, as Penny’s fifth novel unfolds, it isn’t long before murder disturbs the tranquility of the community watched over by the graceful trees that give Three Pines its name. One Sunday morning, the body of a stranger is discovered on the floor of the town’s commercial and spiritual center: the bistro run by Olivier Brulé and his partner, Gabri. The victim appears to be a stranger -- but is he? The answer to that question, and to the more pressing mystery of his killer’s identity, soon rests in the hands of Armand Gamache of the Sûreté du Québec.

Arriving in Three Pines, a town of old friends and, sadly, new suspects, the commanding yet kind Gamache deploys his crew of detectives to gather evidence in the apparently clueless case. Each discovery -- a corpse that won’t stay still, a house whose restoration can’t erase the aura of its haunted past, a log cabin located deep in the woods that holds an astonishing collection of priceless artifacts -- ties another enigmatic knot in the intricate web of secrets and deceptions Gamache must unravel.

Tellingly blending the social pleasures of a cozy with the escalating terror of a psychological thriller, Penny traces Gamache’s investigation as it expands to encompass cultural treasures that range from pieces of the fabled Amber Room to the china of Catherine the Great, from a first edition of Jane Eyre to the violin of the great Czech composer Bohuslav Martinù, from the modern art of the museums of Montreal to Haida totem poles on the mist-enshrouded Queen Charlotte Islands of British Columbia. With breathless anticipation, the reader follows Gamache as he pursues the shocking and brutal truth hidden in the heart of a seemingly loving community.

About the Author
The Brutal Telling is Louise Penny’s fifth Chief Inspector Armand Gamache novel. The series’ debut, Still Life, which introduced readers to the quaint village of Three Pines and the distinguished sleuth who solves its mysteries, announced the arrival of a major talent, winning the New Blood Dagger, Arthur Ellis, Barry, Anthony, and Dilys Awards. Penny’s second and third novels, A Fatal Grace and The Cruelest Month, each won Agatha Awards for Best Novel in the tradition of Agatha Christie. Her fourth Gamache novel, A Rule Against Murder, has been named one of Booklist’s Top Ten Crime Novels for 2009.

Penny’s bestselling mysteries skillfully savor the details of daily life in a small community inhabited by an attractive and unpredictable cast of idiosyncratic souls, while the character of the captivating and magnanimous Gamache prompted fellow crime novelist Reginald Hill to draw a comparison with Georges Simenon’s legendary Maigret.

Born in Toronto in 1958, Penny began her career as a journalist and radio host with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. She believes that her years as a reporter, which took her across Canada from Thunder Bay to Quebec City and finally to Montreal, provided solid training for her work as a novelist. "A good interviewer rarely speaks, she listens. Closely and carefully. I think the same is true of writers." As his fans have learned, the same is true as well of Chief Inspector Armand Gamache. Louise Penny currently lives outside a small village south of Montreal, close to the American border, with her husband, Michael, and their two golden retrievers.

From Our Booksellers
Thank you for introducing me to a terrific new mystery writer. Why hadn’t I discovered this series before? Inspector Gamache is magnifique! I can’t wait to read the first four books. This is the perfect autumn curl-up-on-yourcouch-with-a-café-au-lait read. --Margie Turkett, Annapolis, MD

A riveting story that unfolds like a chain of paper dolls, until it reaches its startling conclusion. --Kelly Yauk, East Lansing, MI

A perfect 10! --Donald Kendall, Troy, MI

So much more than a simple whodunit, The Brutal Telling is a multi-layered, intriguing story with lots of suspects and possible motives. I came to love the characters in the charming Canadian village of Three Pines, and didn’t want to believe that one of them was a murderer. The author does a superb job of revealing just a little at a time -- until the guilty party becomes unglued and the truth comes to the surface. --Jill Borage, St. Louis, MO

Marilyn Stasio
There's always a log fire burning and it's always story time in the charming mysteries Louise Penny sets in sleepy Three Pines…While constant readers may think they know all there is to know about its eccentric villagers, Penny is a great one for springing surprises.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
When the body of an unknown old man turns up in a bistro in Agatha-winner Penny's excellent fifth mystery set in the Quebec village of Three Pines (after Jan. 2009's A Rule Against Murder), Chief Insp. Armand Gamache investigates. At a cabin in the woods apparently belonging to the dead man, Gamache and his team are shocked to discover the remote building is full of priceless antiquities, from first edition books to European treasures thought to have disappeared during WWII. When suspicion falls on one of Three Pines' most prominent citizens, it's up to Gamache to sift through the lies and uncover the truth. Though Gamache is undeniably the focus, Penny continues to develop her growing cast of supporting characters, including newcomers Marc and Dominique Gilbert, who are converting an old house—the site of two murders—into a spa. Readers keen for another glimpse into the life of Three Pines will be well rewarded. 100,000 first printing. (Oct.)
Library Journal
Having won numerous mystery prizes, including the prestigious Arthur Ellis and Anthony awards for her debut, Still Life, Canadian author Penny has only gotten better with each succeeding novel. Her fifth in the series is the finest of all. Featuring series protagonist Chief Inspector Gamache, this literary mystery explores the ways in which sins of the past have a way of resurrecting themselves, wreaking havoc upon their perpetrators, and, unfortunately, the innocent. Thus, when a hermit is slain in the woods near an isolated village in rural Quebec, secrets surface, unmasking characters who have adopted benign personae to conceal their questionable past deeds. Fortunately, sagacious Gamache possesses the acumen to peel away the layers of deceit and to expose the truth. VERDICT This superb novel will appeal to readers who enjoy sophisticated literary mysteries in the tradition of Donna Leon. [See Prepub Mystery, LJ 6/1/09; 100,000-copy first printing; library marketing campaign.]—Lynne F. Maxwell, Villanova Univ. Sch. of Law, PA
Kirkus Reviews
Chief Inspector Gamache of the Canadian Surete is again called to restore order to the tiny Quebecois hamlet of Three Pines. Olivier and Gabri, gay owners of the Bistro and B&B, insist they that they don't know the dead man and can't imagine how he came to be lying on their floor. That's not quite the truth, but it's merely the setup for the first of many surprises. The real story will unravel for Gamache and his subordinates Beauvoir and Lacoste in startling ways. These include the discovery that the corpse has been moved three times by two different people; the return of a father declared dead over 20 years ago; a word woven into a spider's web; and the disclosure of several wood carvings emanating evil that require Gamache to fly to British Columbia and inspect totem poles. Priceless antiques sequestered in a hermit's cabin and sorrowful tales of Czech citizens cheated of their belongings will come to light before Gamache, to his considerable distress, will have to arrest a friend. Penny (A Rule Against Murder, 2009, etc.) is a world-class storyteller. If you don't want to move to Montreal with Gamache as your neighbor-or better yet, relocate to Three Pines and be welcomed into its community of eccentrics-you have sawdust in your veins, which must be very uncomfortable. First printing of 100,000

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312661687
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
08/31/2010
Series:
Chief Inspector Gamache Series, #5
Pages:
400
Sales rank:
31,237
Product dimensions:
8.52(w) x 11.06(h) x 0.86(d)

Read an Excerpt

People lied all the time in murder investigations. If the first victim of war was the truth, some of the first victims of a murder investigation were people’s lies. The lies they told themselves, the lies they told each other....

Gabri approached carrying a tray with four steaming plates. Within minutes they were sitting around the fireplace eating fettuccini with shrimp and scallops sautéed in garlic and olive oil. Fresh bread was produced and glasses of dry white wine poured.

As they ate, they talked about the Labor Day long weekend, about the chestnut trees and conkers. About kids returning to school and the nights drawing in.

The bistro was empty, except for them. But it seemed crowded to the Chief Inspector. With the lies they’d been told, and the lies being manufactured and waiting.

Meet the Author

LOUISE PENNY is The New York Times and Globe and Mail bestselling author of seven novels featuring Chief Inspector Armand Gamache. Her debut, Still Life, won the John Creasey Dagger and the Arthur Ellis, Barry, Anthony, and Dilys Awards, and was named one of the five Mystery/Crime Novels of the Decade by Deadly Pleasures magazine. Penny was the first author ever to win the Agatha Award for Best Novel four times--for A Fatal Grace, The Cruelest Month, The Brutal Telling (which also received the Anthony Award for Best Novel), and Bury Your Dead (which also won the Dilys, Arthur Ellis, Anthony, Macavity, and Nero Awards). She lives in a small village south of Montréal.

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The Brutal Telling (Armand Gamache Series #5) 3.9 out of 5 based on 2 ratings. 190 reviews.
cvjacobs More than 1 year ago
Louise Penny's The Brutal Telling is a village mystery, but that's a little like saying the sky is blue. In the opening scene, a hermit tells Olivier Brulé that "Chaos is coming," but it isn't until the final scene that the author lets us know what the hermit meant. The setting of the mystery is Three Pines, a lovely village about an hour from Montreal that earns its name from three pine trees near the center of town. Everyone knows everyone else in this little town, but that knowledge is challenged when the hermit turns up dead on the floor of Olivier Brulé's bistro. No one will admit that they knew the dead man, at least at first. No one can understand why the body ended up in the bistro. The story includes a diverse group of people, besides a few French and English Canadians, Czech immigrants, Canadian Indians, artists, and many more. The characters come alive through the pages. The not-so-idiotic village idiot with her pet duck, Rosa, papers the investigators with poems. The quiet, but furious struggle between the young couple refurbishing the local mansion and Olivier Brulé and his partner, Gabriel, with their bed and breakfast and pub rumbles in the background. Was the hermit a Czech national? The Czech couple who settled in the village deny any knowledge of him. When you finally close the book, you realize how deeply connected you are to the characters. It is difficult to let them go. Although unobtrusive, the description of the settings resonate long after you turn the last page. When you finally understand the solution to the complex puzzle, you will feel as though you have lived it along with Chief Inspector Gamache. A truly haunting novel. A great read!
poosie More than 1 year ago
The Brutal Telling is a complex tale of treasures and greed. It all takes place in a charming little village populated by unusual characters you will grow to appreciate and love. I love Penny's intricate weaving of history and storyline. At the end of this mesmerizing book, the village of Three Pines will never be the same, but there is hope. The main characters were fascinating, the setting was unusual and intriguing, and there were mysteries galore to hold your interest. The first scene is one of the best hooks I've read in a while! I highly recommend!
SllvnKathleen More than 1 year ago
I have gobbled up all five of Louise Penny's tales of murder in the last month. I enjoy the ambiance of her quiet Quebec village and the familiar presence of the village people. I love the easy back and forth between the English and French languages and the background of the historical struggle between the two cultures. I find the folks very multi-faceted and human. I love to see how the people of all proclivities, talents, and flaws interact and behave among each other. Louise Penny truly knows the feelings and behaviors of real people in the real world and manages very easily to translate those articulately into her created universe.
Ronrose More than 1 year ago
Bon Dieu! How is it that I have not found this author before? "The Brutal Telling", by Louise Penny, is more than just a detective story. It is a literary novel. This work blends the lives of the characters and the reader by speaking to the souls of both. As in all great literature, the characters come to life through the words of the author, quickly becoming more than just the written word. The characters, such as Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, are completely developed people, full of life. Each acting and reacting to the other characters in the novel. Have no doubt, this mystery novel leads us through a perplexing mystery surrounding the violent death of stranger in the small Canadian town of Three Pines. This is not the first time the Inspector and his team of Seretes investigators have been called to this out of the way place. Emotions run high as both long time friends and newcomers are brought under suspicion. If the earlier novels of this series are anything like this, I'll be hot on their trail.
cewilch More than 1 year ago
Through this author I have come to love the Armand Gamache series, the village of Three Pines and all of its lovable and enduring characters. When I first discovered Louise Penny it was in her book A RULE AGAINST MURDER, and then I went back and read all the previous Armand Gamache books. I have to say I feel almost mortally wounded to have this book end the way it did, with one of the most "real" characters being taken away. Unless there is some kind of redemption for this character in the next book, I'm not sure how I will feel. This story would have been perfect if a more disposable character would've been fingered. I think I'm in mourning.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The characters are like meeting with old friends. The conversation is real and what is left unsaid is understood. Whether the characters are good or bad you can understand their thought processes.
Noticer More than 1 year ago
Most enjoyable and keeps you thinking to solve the problem. Moves along smoothly and presents material which develops knowledge about areas few know. Would recommend to those who want to learn as well as have enjoyment.
Justsooze More than 1 year ago
Louise Penny is my new favorite mystery author. I eagerly awaited "The Brutal Telling", #5 in her Inspector Gamache series and her first hardcover release and I was not disappointed. Ms. Penny is a storyteller extraodinaire. The characters are well drawn, complex and interesting - not only Inspector Armand Gamache, but his team and the villagers of Three Pines, Quebec, that we have come to know in the previous books. She is faultless in her plotting and characterization...but ultimately it is the way she tells her story and the cleverness of the story itself that draws the reader in...and doesn't let go until the last page is turned. The death of a mysterious stranger in the woods outside Three Pines brings Inspector Gamache and his team back to the village, where the deepest secrets of the hearts of the inhabitants are slowly revealed against the backdrop of the telling of an amazing story.....I don't want to reveal anything crucial....give yourself a gift, buy this book and settle down for a most enjoyable time....
Lannie More than 1 year ago
This is a haunting tale full of secrets and lies. Yet another wonderful cozy setting in a Canadian Village. I was laughing one minute and scratching my head the next...COMPELLING REAL LIFE FLAWED CHARACTERS and and a thought-provoking, complex storyline that makes you think, even when you're not reading! Wonderful! Two more books on my "shelf of Treasures"...THE HELP ,by K. Stockett and EXPLOSION IN PARIS, by L. Pirrung
writerrosemarie More than 1 year ago
Louise Penny's fifth novel "The Brutal Telling" is her first for me. I am so glad B&N recommended this book. I enjoyed it so much I promptly bought her 4 other novels. Each novel gets better and better. I am looking forward to her next Chief Inspector Gamache novel. I don't know what I enjoy most about these wonderful mysteries - the Chief Inspector, his team, the village of Three Pines or the characters inhabiting it. Ms. Penny's descriptions of county life, food, and art, as well as her insights on human nature, are right on the money. She shares knowledge about the history of Quebec and Canada in a very entertaining way. The mystery keeps you guessing and I changed my mind a few times as to whom the culprit was. Also, her depiction of the Gamache "family" which includes wife, children, grandchildren and his Team made Chief Inspector Andre Gamache one of the most endearing characters I've read about in a long time. Thank you B&N for recommending this book. If you enjoy mysteries, great characters, and a setting that makes you wish you were there, check out the Chief Inspector Gamache Novels.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I haven't read a mystery for a long while as I was starting to get very bored with all of them, but I picked this book up because it was a "B&N Recommendation" and I am so glad that I did. This was not only the best book I've read for months, but it was an excellent mystery too! I couldn't wait to get home to continue and was sorry when it was finished. I ran right out and bought the first 4 installments of Louise Penny's Inspector Armand Gamache series. Louise Penny's stories are a treat.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The journey was enjoyable, but the solution was horrid. It's like expecting a fudge jelly bean & finding out that it was a dirt bean from a bertie botts pack
retromom More than 1 year ago
I was fortunate enough to receive an advance copy of this book. It was my first book from this author and her series but I think I will be reading the other books in the series as well. The story takes place in Three Pines which is a small village near Quebec. A body is found in the Bistro run by Olivier and his partner Gabri. No one seems to know who the dead man is nor how he he got there. Of course there are many suspects and there are many interesting finds along the way. I don't want to get into too much of the story as it would spoil the mystery but there are many twists and turns. Chief Inspector Gamache and his team are a unique bunch of characters as are the village residents. You can't help but fall in love with Three Pines thanks to Louise Penny's wonderful descriptions of the village. I had a distinct picture in my mind of Three Pines. I could imagine myself walking through the village or the woods. Some of the villagers are quite amusing. There is even a duck that wears clothing. And the description of the food at the Bistro had my mouth watering! Others have said the authors writing reminds them of Agatha Christie. It's been many years since I have read one of her books but I did get the same feeling too. It has been many years since I have read a mystery and I found this mystery a great way to dig into mysteries again. It was truly enjoyable. Now that I feel so at home in Three Pines I will be sure to visit again. Thanks to Tara at St. Martins for this ARC.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Another book unbuyable thanks to harriet klausner revealing every detail about the book. Its bad enough most of the reviews here are plot spoilers, but harriet klausner is one of the worst. She is consistently ruining every single book she supposedly reviews. Please,bn, please put a stop to this poster. She is costing you money in lost sales.
lotto53 More than 1 year ago
great characters rich and deep plot
sandiek More than 1 year ago
A man's body has been found in the bistro of Three Pines village. No one knows who this man is, what he is doing in the village or who could have been involved in his death. Inspector Armand Gamache and his team descend on the village to discover what has happened and who is responsible. Gamache and his team have been to Three Pines before and they know the people. There is Ruth, a famous poet who now is a bitter old woman who seems half mad. Olivier and Gabri are a gay couple that run the bistro. Myrna is a former psychologist who now runs a second-hand bookstore. The Parras are members of the refuge Czech settlement. Peter and Clare are artists, with Clare about to break out and become famous. The Gilberts are the newcomers in town. They have bought a ruined house above the village and are turning it into a luxury hotel and spa, a move that doesn't endear them to the village regulars. As the case progresses, the team discovers that the man had lived as a hermit in the woods surrounding the village. No one there had known of his existence, except for the person who had supplied his needs. As the police investigate, his cabin yields marvels. It is full of heirlooms, true treasures from all over the world. These are marvelous items; items from the courts of Europe as well as fabulous art objects. How did this hermit come to have these treasures and who was he? The hermit himself was a gifted woodcarver and his mystery is solved as his sculptures are found and give up their clues about their creator. Louise Penny is the most exciting find of the year for me. Her book is intricate and the plot is complex. Each character is fully developed, and the reader sees how each interacts with all those around them. As the book progresses, the reader discovers each person's strengths and their foibles, and how their characteristics have caused the events that have resulted in the murder. This book is recommended for mystery readers; especially those who enjoy authors such as Elizabeth George and P.D. James. This is an exquisite book.
Cele More than 1 year ago
All of Louise Penny's books are much more than simple mysteries. They are explorations of the human spirit. This novel is darker than her others, but the truth of her characters and the way their lives interweave remain as always. And Gamache's wisdom is forever satisfying. As you read, you will find yourself putting the book down from time to time to ponder over the wisdom and insight of this remarkable author.
lb7 More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed the 5th in the Armand Gamache series. Louise Penny's cast of characters is an endearing albeit off beat lot. It amazes me that she is able to construct another story within the framework of the tight knit community of Three Pines. It is a testament to her ability as a writer. I hope Armand and Three Pines stays around a long time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was my mystery clubs selection for December. great book, but not happy with the ending.
bookwormsarefierce More than 1 year ago
Louise Penny is a new writer, but it feels like a cozy Agatha Christie or a morally challenging Anne Perry. There is depth to the characters and the story line reveals something new each time whether about people and how we relate to each other or a unique experience like being an artist or a marginalized people. I will not spoil the story by providing details (and those can be found when reading the publisher reviews anyway), but I will say that you will enjoy Armand, Marie, Clara and Peter and even Ruth, the odd one out.
hd93021 More than 1 year ago
Not having read any of the earlier books in the Armand Gamache series, I feel this stands alone as an enjoyable murder mystery, and it has made me consider buying, at least, one or two of the others. The characters were well-developed and interesting, as was the plot. I was, however, disappointed with the ending. This was the first book I have read in this genre, and I enjoyed it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
All around good read...Plot, characters, setting. If I HAD to pick a faul twith the book I'd say the length. I'd like this book a bit shorter but this is nit-picking. Great Read! Enjoy!
leroy20 More than 1 year ago
going to read another book by same author
MikeDraper More than 1 year ago
Chief Inspector Armand Gamache is called to the location of a man found murdered, his body is in the bistro in Three Pines, Canada. From the moment the body of the Hermit is found, the author perfectly captures the soul of this quaint area in Quebec. I was fascinated with the start of the novel. The first words, "All of them? Even the children? The fireplace sputtered and crackled and swallowed his gasp. "Slaughtered?" I was hooked. Louise Penny is a very descriptive writer. Her books would be easy to transition into the world of film. In fact, as I learned more of Oliver Broule and the Hermit, and the Hermit's home in the woods, a home filled with treasures, I was picturing the story unfolding as a made for TV drama, perhaps on Mystery Theater. The author's writing is reminiscent of the great Agatha Christie. I compare Christie's protagonist Hercule Poirot with Louise Penny's Armond Gamache. Both men have a quiet, unassuming manner and are extremely polite to the suspects as well as to the innocent characters. Both investigators are well respected and use logic to solve the puzzles presented in the mysteries. This is the fifth story with Chief Inspector Gamache and the critics knew from the start that they had a star in the making. Her first novel, "Still Life" won the New Blood Dagger, Arthur Ellis, Barry, Anthony and Dilys Awards. Amazing!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago