Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing

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Overview

An essential update of the perennial bestseller.Charcuterie exploded onto the scene in 2005 and encouraged an army of home cooks and professional chefs to start curing their own foods. This love song to animal fat and salt has blossomed into a bona fide culinary movement, throughout America and beyond, of curing meats and making sausage, pâtés, and confits. Charcuterie: Revised and Updated will remain the ultimate and authoritative guide to that movement, spreading the revival ...
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Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing (Revised and Updated)

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Overview

An essential update of the perennial bestseller.Charcuterie exploded onto the scene in 2005 and encouraged an army of home cooks and professional chefs to start curing their own foods. This love song to animal fat and salt has blossomed into a bona fide culinary movement, throughout America and beyond, of curing meats and making sausage, pâtés, and confits. Charcuterie: Revised and Updated will remain the ultimate and authoritative guide to that movement, spreading the revival of this ancient culinary craft.
Early in his career, food writer Michael Ruhlman had his first taste of duck confit. The experience “became a fascination that transformed into a quest” to understand the larger world of food preservation, called charcuterie, once a critical factor in human survival. He wondered why its methods and preparations, which used to keep communities alive and allowed for long-distance exploration, had been almost forgotten. Along the way he met Brian Polcyn, who had been surrounded with traditional and modern charcuterie since childhood. “My Polish grandma made kielbasa every Christmas and Easter,” he told Ruhlman. At the time, Polcyn was teaching butchery at Schoolcraft College outside Detroit.Ruhlman and Polcyn teamed up to share their passion for cured meats with a wider audience. The rest is culinary history. Charcuterie: Revised and Updated is organized into chapters on key practices: salt-cured meats like pancetta, dry-cured meats like salami and chorizo, forcemeats including pâtés and terrines, and smoked meats and fish. Readers will find all the classic recipes: duck confit, sausages, prosciutto, bacon, pâté de campagne, and knackwurst, among others. Ruhlman and Polcyn also expand on traditional mainstays, offering recipes for hot- and cold-smoked salmon; shrimp, lobster, and leek sausage; and grilled vegetable terrine. All these techniques make for a stunning addition to a contemporary menu.Thoroughly instructive and fully illustrated, this updated edition includes seventy-five detailed line drawings that guide the reader through all the techniques. With new recipes and revised sections to reflect the best equipment available today, Charcuterie: Revised and Updated remains the undisputed authority on charcuterie.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Without the faintest hint of apology, Ruhlman and Polcyn present an arsenal of recipes that take hours, and sometimes days, to prepare; are loaded with fat; and, if ill-prepared, can lead to botulism. The result is one of the most intriguing and important cookbooks published this year. Ruhlman (The Soul of a Chef) is a food poet, and the pig is his muse. On witnessing a plate of cold cuts in Italy, he is awed by "the way the sunlight hit the fat of the dried meats, the way it glistened, the beauty of the meat." He relates and refines the work of Polcyn, a chef-instructor at a college in Livonia, Mich., who butchers a whole hog "every couple weeks for his students." Together, they make holy the art of stuffing a sausage, the brining of a corned beef and the poaching of a salted meat in its own fat. An extensive chapter on p t s and terrines is entitled "The Cinderella Meat Loaf" and runs the gamut from exotic Venison Terrine with Dried Cherries to hearty English Pork Pie with a crust made from both lard and butter. And while there's no shortage of lyricism, science plays an equally important role. Everyone knows salt is a preservative, for example, but here we learn exactly how it does its job. And a section on safety issues weighs the dangers of nitrites and explains the difference between good white mold and the dangerous, green, fuzzy stuff. Line drawings. Agent, Elizabeth Kaplan. (Nov. 21) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393240054
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/3/2013
  • Edition description: Revised and Updated
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 55,543
  • Product dimensions: 8.20 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Mike Ruhlman
Michael Ruhlman has written and coauthored many bestsellers, among them The French Laundry Cookbook and Ratio. He lives in Cleveland Heights, Ohio.

Brian Polcyn is the chef/owner of Forest Grill in Birmingham, Michigan, and a professor of charcuterie at SchoolCraft College in Livonia, Michigan.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 14 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 11, 2009

    A more in depth look at sausage and salami making for the home cook

    If you are interested in making suasages, salami and terrines at home, this is a great book for a moderate to advanced skilled cook. I wouldn't recommend it for a beginner though. The directions are clear and easy to follow and the recipe selections is very large with recipies that are hard to find in other sausage and cured meat cookbooks. I also enjoyed the section about sauces and pickles.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2006

    The Password is Immersion

    These are not two cursory craftsmen. They have both been immersed for a long time in what they do Polcyn is a chef/instructor specializing but certainly not limited to charcuterie (perhaps it is a sign of divine predestination that his name from birth was essentially Brine Porcine). Ruhlman is a food scribe extraordinaire, as witnessed by his exhaustive coverage of Thomas Keller, Eric Ripert, Michael Symon and of course, Brian Polcyn. So it comes as no surprise that they should choose to enlighten the masses about the science of immersion, priced within anyone's reach. ***** The techniques in this book can actually be applied metaphorically to almost anything. The consequences of saturation are never better demonstrated than within the covers of this book, and every procedure involves some sort of osmosis through either wet or dry submersion. A light bulb will go on over your head if you read this book while your kids are watching TV. Environmental factors will be highlighted and your awareness of them will be heightened. Your food will start to taste better, unless you're eating with the clowns, colonels and cartoon kings. ***** If you're lucky enough to be able to make some spare time for yourself, I can't imagine a more productive way to spend it than by using this book to prepare food an order of magnitude better than most cookbook fare. If putting your time in is how you pay your dues, this is the most profitable route to take I know. ***** Did I mention that there are recipes for every technique?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2009

    Great overview and recipes

    Very informative for overall processes, and all the recipes I have tried so far work perfectly.

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