The Clothes on Their Backs

( 7 )

Overview

"In a red-brick mansion block near the Marylebone Road, Vivien, a sensitive, bookish girl, grows up sealed off from both past and present by her timid refugee parents. Then a glamorous uncle appears, in a mohair suit, with a diamond watch on his wrist and a girl in a leopard-skin hat on his arm. Why is Uncle Sandor so violently unwelcome in her parents' home? Vivien wants to know." "This is a story about survival - both everyday and heroic - and a young woman who discovers the complications, even betrayals, that inevitably accompany the fierce
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The Clothes On Their Backs: A Novel

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Overview

"In a red-brick mansion block near the Marylebone Road, Vivien, a sensitive, bookish girl, grows up sealed off from both past and present by her timid refugee parents. Then a glamorous uncle appears, in a mohair suit, with a diamond watch on his wrist and a girl in a leopard-skin hat on his arm. Why is Uncle Sandor so violently unwelcome in her parents' home? Vivien wants to know." "This is a story about survival - both everyday and heroic - and a young woman who discovers the complications, even betrayals, that inevitably accompany the fierce desire to live." Set against the backdrop of 1970s London, The Clothes on Their Backs is a wise and tender novel about the clothes we choose to wear, the personalities we dress ourselves in, and about how they define us all.
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Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
A brilliant little novel-winner of the Orange Prize-concerning family, memory and transformation. In passing a formerly smart London dress shop now going out of business, Vivien Kovaks runs into the shop proprietor, a former lover of her uncle Sandor, a week after the death of Vivien's father. Grant (When I Lived in Modern Times, 2001, etc.) uses this chance encounter to set the scene for Vivien's reminiscence about her past, a time decades before when she had "learned the only truth that matters: that suffering does not ennoble and that survivors survive because of their strength or cunning or luck, not their goodness, and certainly not their innocence." Vivien sweeps us into a narrative about her parents, Ervin and Berta, refugees from Hungary who moved to London shortly after World War II to start a new life. Vivien is curious about their past because it contains the seeds of her own, but her parents are decidedly reticent about sharing information on their former life, preferring instead to live within a narrowly circumscribed and risk-free circle of silence. Enter Sandor, a flamboyant and successful slumlord who's spent time in gaol for his shady business activities (and who's been labeled "the face of evil" by the London press). He's now out of prison, bent but not broken, and he commissions Vivien to help him write his life story; both are aware of their family connection, yet both keep up the pretense that they're just strangers. Vivien must keep her role of amanuensis secret from her father, who's violently opposed to Sandor's dubious professional activities. Much of the story involves Vivien getting in touch with her own identity by uncovering her father's; by dealing with thefreakish and tragic death of her young husband on their honeymoon; and by engaging in and then walking away from a torrid sexual relationship with a young punk. Intelligent, distinguished and psychologically astute.
From the Publisher
"There is nothing lightweight about its themes and yet it is so artfully constructed that you barely feel you're reading it at all, so fluid and addictive is the plot." — The Observer

"Gripping and written with keen understatement, it manages to be a domestic coming-of-age story even as it takes in the tumultuous sweep of the twentieth century." — The Evening Standard

"Like money, clothes have real, symbolic and psychological value. Linda Grant understands these dimensions implicitly. Stitched beautifully into the fabric of her latest novel is an acute understanding of the role clothes play in reflecting identity and self-worth.... Grant's own particular beam reveals the way we acquire our sense of self from what gets reflected back to us, either in the mirror or in our relationships with others. She is at home writing about the thrilling ripple of a skirt as she is charting social tensions." — The Sunday Telegraph

"We are what we wear because clothes reveal our personalities but, as Grant makes clear as she guides us through a dizzying ethical maze, they also conceal them....In this meticulously textured and complex novel, beneath Grant's surface dressing, what she is talking about is more than skin deep." — The Sunday Times

"A beautifully detailed character study, a poignant family history, and a richly evocative portrait..." — The Independent

"This vivid, enjoyable and consistently unexpected novel is like Anita Brookner with sex. Sándor's mix of the endearing and the repellent takes on a life beyond that of an absorbing and unexpectedly ambitious story." — The Telegraph

"This is a terrific novel, bursting with life and vivid characters." — The Mail on Sunday

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781439142363
  • Publisher: Scribner
  • Publication date: 11/25/2008
  • Edition description: Original
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 547,471
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Linda Grant is a novelist and journalist. She won the Orange Prize for Fiction in 2000 and the Lettre Ulysses Prize for the Art of Reportage in 2006. Her most recent novel, The Clothes on Their Backs, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2008. She writes for The Guardian, The Telegraph, and Vogue.

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Introduction

The Clothes on Their Backs by Linda Grant
Reading Group Guide

Introduction

Vivien Kovacs, a sensitive and imaginative girl, grows up sealed off from the world in a London apartment building full of eccentric recluses. Her timid parents conceal the details of their escape from Hungary during the Holocaust and shy away from any encounter with the outside world, so Vivien must learn to navigate society on her own. With the help of a large wardrobe of vintage clothes, Vivien sets out for college and transforms herself into a beautiful and educated young woman. But, when tragedy strikes, Vivien returns home to her parents and to a routine of lonely, empty days and nights. A chance encounter leads Vivien to her estranged uncle, notorious criminal and slum lord, Sándor Kovacs. Against her father's wishes she helps Sándor record his life story, which he is anxious to share in his old age. As Sándor reveals the surprising truth about her family's past, Vivien begins to understand who she really is, and where she belongs.

Questions for Discussion

1. "The clothes you wear are a metamorphosis. They change you from the outside in....We are forever turning into someone else, and should never forget that someone else is always looking." How does clothing help to define the characters at different stages of their lives? How else is clothing used as a metaphor in the novel?

2. How do the various characters use secrets as a means of protection? How do the revelations of these secrets lead to both tragedy and freedom for those involved?

3. Are there indications that Ervin and Sándor love each other despite their decades-long feud? Inwhat ways do they express their love? What is ironic about the way each influences the life of the other?

4. Vivien says, "I learned the only truth that matters: that suffering does not ennoble and that survivors survive because of their strength or cunning or luck, not their goodness, and certainly not their innocence." Discuss this statement and how it relates to the theme of survival in this book.

5. How do the other residents of Benson Court open up Vivien's world?

6. What does the book tell us about the complicated nature of truth?

7. Describing Alexander's death Vivien says, "[I]t's just ridiculous the doors that are slightly ajar between life and death. Life's extreme fragility is all around us, as if we are perpetually walking on floors of cracked glass." Discuss this theme as it relates to the book as a whole.

8. Why does Vivien's mother encourage her to have an abortion? Did this surprise you?

9. Vivien says, "If you try, if you have a profound willingness to let yourself go completely you can enter the mind of another person....the more you practice it, the more interesting life becomes, though also harder to bear because you understand how quickly most people reach their own limitations, how impossible it is for them to fulfill your ardent expectations of them." What does Vivien mean? How do we all have expectations of others that are impossible for them to fulfill?

10. Sándor is a controversial character who, despite his crimes, has many likeable qualities. What did you think of him? Were you more sympathetic toward him after reading his story in his own words? Are his actions forgivable?

11. Vivien says she and Sándor are alike. Do you think this is true? How so?

12. What did you think of Vivien's father? Were you sympathetic toward him? Why might it be easier to like Sándor better than Ervin?

13. When Vivien finds the swastika drawing in Claude's notebook she says, "When you are the enemy of a person with an ideology, you're in serious trouble....I knew that quite ordinary people, who had no thoughts at all, just feelings, could be equally dangerous." What is dangerous about Claude? What is the significance of this statement as it relates to the historical content of this book?

14. What is the significance of the book's title? How can it be interpreted in several different ways?

15. Did you like Vivien? Did you feel that you knew her better by the book's end, or was she still somewhat mysterious to you? Why might this be?

16. During Vivien and Sándor's last conversation Sándor kisses Vivien's hand. "My uncle, my flesh and blood which had suffered and made others to suffer. Revulsion and empathy, these were my feelings." How do Vivien's feelings about Sándor change over the course of the novel? Does she come to love him? Toward who else does Vivien feel both revulsion and empathy?

17. Why does Eunice see Sándor differently from everyone else? How does her past parallel Sándor's? What does she have in common with other characters in the novel?

18. Why does Sándor attack Claude? What does Vivien mean when she says Sándor "died of his own eye?"

19. Discuss the role that chance encounters play in shaping the lives of these characters and setting the stage for far-reaching consequences. How are we all shaped by chance in many ways?

Enhance Your Book Club

1. This novel is full of delicious desserts. Ask everyone to bring a different cake or sweet treat based on one in the book and serve with coffee. Or bring your favorite cake recipes for swapping.

2. Have a clothes swap. In honor of Vivien's love for vintage dresses, gather up items you no longer wear to bring to your book club meeting. Open some beverages and snacks, have a mini fashion show, and trade!

3. Learn more about the author at http://www.lindagrant.co.uk/.

Linda Grant is a novelist and journalist. She won the Orange Prize for Fiction in 2000 and the Lettre Ulysses Award for the Art of Reportage in 2006. She writes for the Guardian, Telegraph, and Vogue. She lives in North London.

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Reading Group Guide

The Clothes on Their Backs by Linda Grant Reading Group Guide

Introduction

Vivien Kovacs, a sensitive and imaginative girl, grows up sealed off from the world in a London apartment building full of eccentric recluses. Her timid parents conceal the details of their escape from Hungary during the Holocaust and shy away from any encounter with the outside world, so Vivien must learn to navigate society on her own. With the help of a large wardrobe of vintage clothes, Vivien sets out for college and transforms herself into a beautiful and educated young woman. But, when tragedy strikes, Vivien returns home to her parents and to a routine of lonely, empty days and nights. A chance encounter leads Vivien to her estranged uncle, notorious criminal and slum lord, Sándor Kovacs. Against her father's wishes she helps Sándor record his life story, which he is anxious to share in his old age. As Sándor reveals the surprising truth about her family's past, Vivien begins to understand who she really is, and where she belongs.

Questions for Discussion

1. "The clothes you wear are a metamorphosis. They change you from the outside in....We are forever turning into someone else, and should never forget that someone else is always looking." How does clothing help to define the characters at different stages of their lives? How else is clothing used as a metaphor in the novel?

2. How do the various characters use secrets as a means of protection? How do the revelations of these secrets lead to both tragedy and freedom for those involved?

3. Are there indications that Ervin and Sándor love each other despite their decades-long feud? In what ways do they express their love? What is ironic about the way each influences the life of the other?

4. Vivien says, "I learned the only truth that matters: that suffering does not ennoble and that survivors survive because of their strength or cunning or luck, not their goodness, and certainly not their innocence." Discuss this statement and how it relates to the theme of survival in this book.

5. How do the other residents of Benson Court open up Vivien's world?

6. What does the book tell us about the complicated nature of truth?

7. Describing Alexander's death Vivien says, "[I]t's just ridiculous the doors that are slightly ajar between life and death. Life's extreme fragility is all around us, as if we are perpetually walking on floors of cracked glass." Discuss this theme as it relates to the book as a whole.

8. Why does Vivien's mother encourage her to have an abortion? Did this surprise you?

9. Vivien says, "If you try, if you have a profound willingness to let yourself go completely you can enter the mind of another person....the more you practice it, the more interesting life becomes, though also harder to bear because you understand how quickly most people reach their own limitations, how impossible it is for them to fulfill your ardent expectations of them." What does Vivien mean? How do we all have expectations of others that are impossible for them to fulfill?

10. Sándor is a controversial character who, despite his crimes, has many likeable qualities. What did you think of him? Were you more sympathetic toward him after reading his story in his own words? Are his actions forgivable?

11. Vivien says she and Sándor are alike. Do you think this is true? How so?

12. What did you think of Vivien's father? Were you sympathetic toward him? Why might it be easier to like Sándor better than Ervin?

13. When Vivien finds the swastika drawing in Claude's notebook she says, "When you are the enemy of a person with an ideology, you're in serious trouble....I knew that quite ordinary people, who had no thoughts at all, just feelings, could be equally dangerous." What is dangerous about Claude? What is the significance of this statement as it relates to the historical content of this book?

14. What is the significance of the book's title? How can it be interpreted in several different ways?

15. Did you like Vivien? Did you feel that you knew her better by the book's end, or was she still somewhat mysterious to you? Why might this be?

16. During Vivien and Sándor's last conversation Sándor kisses Vivien's hand. "My uncle, my flesh and blood which had suffered and made others to suffer. Revulsion and empathy, these were my feelings." How do Vivien's feelings about Sándor change over the course of the novel? Does she come to love him? Toward who else does Vivien feel both revulsion and empathy?

17. Why does Eunice see Sándor differently from everyone else? How does her past parallel Sándor's? What does she have in common with other characters in the novel?

18. Why does Sándor attack Claude? What does Vivien mean when she says Sándor "died of his own eye?"

19. Discuss the role that chance encounters play in shaping the lives of these characters and setting the stage for far-reaching consequences. How are we all shaped by chance in many ways?

Enhance Your Book Club

1. This novel is full of delicious desserts. Ask everyone to bring a different cake or sweet treat based on one in the book and serve with coffee. Or bring your favorite cake recipes for swapping.

2. Have a clothes swap. In honor of Vivien's love for vintage dresses, gather up items you no longer wear to bring to your book club meeting. Open some beverages and snacks, have a mini fashion show, and trade!

3. Learn more about the author at http://www.lindagrant.co.uk/.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 7 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2009

    Great Historical Rainy Day Read About Jewish European Immigrants

    While not always historically correct,and the title is a bit misleading (you think it might be a story about a fashion designer or that industry), 'The Clothes Off Their Backs' is engaging, with plot twists that are clever. The main character is not likable, and the supporting characters could use a bit more development, but is was entertaining, and I found that I could not put it down once I had started reading it. It definitely a candidate for a made-for-TV movie special feature.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 6, 2009

    A little dark....

    The story was a good one...however I stumbled through it. Not what I had expected and definately not a feel good book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2010

    Too many unanswered questions

    Still waiting for the family history.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

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