Delirium (Delirium Series #1)

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Overview

Love. The deadliest of all deadly things: It kills you both when you have it and when you don’t.

In Lauren Oliver’s stunning second novel, love has been declared a dangerous disease, and the government forces everyone who reaches eighteen to have a procedure called the cure. Lena Haloway is very much looking forward to being cured and living a safe, predictable life. But then she meets enigmatic Alex, who lives under the government’s radar. ...

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Overview

Love. The deadliest of all deadly things: It kills you both when you have it and when you don’t.

In Lauren Oliver’s stunning second novel, love has been declared a dangerous disease, and the government forces everyone who reaches eighteen to have a procedure called the cure. Lena Haloway is very much looking forward to being cured and living a safe, predictable life. But then she meets enigmatic Alex, who lives under the government’s radar. What will happen if they do the unthinkable and fall in love?

Lauren Oliver follows up her incandescent debut, the New York Times bestseller Before I Fall, with this extraordinary novel about a high-stakes romance set in a dystopian United States. Delirium presents a world as terrifying as The Hunger Games and a romance as true as Romeo and Juliet.

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    May11_5/DeliriumTrilogyAuthorVideo_FINAL_BB_5fc6ae49dda81839dbb11a3f8e6244f271192586  

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Lauren Oliver's debut work Before I Fall ensnared out intention with its vivid character portrayal; now the youthful novelist returns with another captivating fiction about a teenage girl in a strange, yet ever so relevant life changing situation. The narrator of Delirium suffers from a romantic malady that feels like it could be fatal; something most teens can understand. A powerful trilogy launch volume. (Hand-selling tip: Lauren Oliver is an author to watch. The film rights for her first novel have just been optioned and her eponymous website continues to gain fans.)

Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA) (Starred Review)
Praise for Before I Fall:“Samantha’s attempts to save her life and right the wrongs she has caused are precisely what will draw readers into this complex story and keep them turning pages until Sam succeeds in living her last day the right way.”
Booklist
“Oliver’s follow-up to her smash debut, Before I Fall (2010), is another deft blend of realism and fantasy...the book never loses its A Clockwork Orange-style bite regarding safety versus choice.”
ALA Booklist
Praise for Before I Fall:“Oliver, in a pitch-perfect teen voice, explores the power we have to affect the people around us in this intensely believable first novel...This is a compelling book with a powerful message and should not be missed.”
The Horn Book
“In a thick climate of fear, Oliver spins out a suspenseful story of awakening and resistance with true love at its core.”
New York Journal of Books
“Oliver’s deeply emotional and incredibly well-honed prose commands the readers’ attention and captures their hearts. With a pulse-pounding tempo and unforeseen twists and turns, Lauren Oliver has opened the door on a fantastic new series; the second book can’t come soon enough.”
Publishers Weekly
In her sophomore novel, Oliver (Before I Fall) presents an intriguing but disappointing thought experiment, set in a dystopian future in which American borders are sealed and civil order is enforced by regulation, vigilantism, and "the procedure," a coming-of-age lobotomy that excises amor deliria nervosa, or love. Nearly 18, Lena Haloway welcomes the prospect; her mother underwent three unsuccessful procedures and eventually committed suicide, so Lena deeply believes that love equals suffering. Still, there's a subversiveness to her thoughts and actions, from nurturing the motherless child Gracie to reading Romeo and Juliet because it is "beautiful," not the cautionary tale it's presented as. When a strange, handsome boy begins to intrude on her life, strictly against the regulations, the "beauty" of that tragic trope begins to play out swiftly and relentlessly. The prose is accomplished, and the Portland, Maine, setting wonderfully evoked. However, Oliver's nightmare future lacks a visceral punch, primarily because of the weakness of the world-building. Her America has undergone a seismic shift, but the economic, religious, and cultural ramifications are all but ignored. Ages 14–up. (Feb.)
Booklist
“Oliver’s follow-up to her smash debut, Before I Fall (2010), is another deft blend of realism and fantasy...the book never loses its A Clockwork Orange-style bite regarding safety versus choice.”
ALA Booklist
Praise for Before I Fall:“Oliver, in a pitch-perfect teen voice, explores the power we have to affect the people around us in this intensely believable first novel...This is a compelling book with a powerful message and should not be missed.”
The Horn Book
“In a thick climate of fear, Oliver spins out a suspenseful story of awakening and resistance with true love at its core.”
New York Journal of Books
“Oliver’s deeply emotional and incredibly well-honed prose commands the readers’ attention and captures their hearts. With a pulse-pounding tempo and unforeseen twists and turns, Lauren Oliver has opened the door on a fantastic new series; the second book can’t come soon enough.”
Jay Asher
Praise for Before I Fall:“This story races forward, twisting in a new direction every few pages, its characters spinning my emotions from affection to frustration, anger to compassion. You’ll have no choice but to tear through this book!”
Carolyn Mackler
Praise for Before I Fall:“Before I Fall is smart, complex, and heartbreakingly beautiful. Lauren Oliver has written an extraordinary debut novel about what it means to live—and die.”
VOYA - Stacey Hayman
Sometime in the future of an altered, broken America, Lena feels lucky to live in the safety of Portland, Maryland, and benefit from the structure of governmental rules and regulations. More importantly, Lena looks forward to turning eighteen and undergoing the surgery that will prevent her from ever contracting amor deliria nervosa, or the disease known as love. Lena is desperate for the Cure so that her painful childhood memories will be dulled to the point of indifference, and she will be left with the proper, passive existence of the Cured. Then, Alex comes into her life. He is a young man from the wrong side of the electrified fence, a member of the resistance, the one person who makes her feel beautiful and special. Can they hide their growing feelings from watchful eyes or will Lena wind-up losing everything—her life and her love? There are odd issues with the way the Cure is explained versus how it seems to actually effect, or not, characters' actions. What makes a Cured person feel entitled to better material goods than others, relish someone's pain, or keep a pet if its brutal death has no impact on them? Considering this is the first in a trilogy, it is surprising how long and rambling this story becomes. The slow pacing also removes any sense of urgency in the development of Lena and Alex's star-crossed love story. The cliffhanger ending is pleasantly suspenseful and this reader hopes some of the more obvious logic errors are addressed in forthcoming entries. Reviewer: Stacey Hayman
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up—In this gripping dystopian novel set in a future Portland, ME, everyone is safe, unhappiness can be cured, and the freedoms we take for granted have been relinquished in the name of "security" and "the common good." There is no risk and no pain, or at least there won't be for 17-year-old Lena Haloway and her outspoken friend, Hana, once they turn 18. They will then be eligible, in fact forced, to undergo the procedure that will render them impervious to delirium—the disease that was formerly known as love. You can see, of course, right where this is headed, but the ride is well worthwhile. Lena is an engaging and believable protagonist, at first compliant, then questioning, and finally desperate to save herself and the irrepressible emotions blooming within her. Her journey to understanding is both painful and exhilarating as she meets free-spirited Alex, succumbs to delirium, and wrestles with the social code she's been taught so well. Ultimately, Lena gets a shocking glimpse into the world outside the city's borders and witnesses the barbaric underpinnings of the "safe" world in which she has lived. Especially heartbreaking is her discovery of the fate of her mother, who was unable to stop loving her husband and daughters and paid a terrible price for her transgression. On the other hand, Lena's caring but numbed-out aunt and her scrupulously compliant older sister make clear the consequences of obedience to tyranny. Strong characters, a vivid portrait of the lives of teens in a repressive society, and nagging questions that can be applied to our world today make this book especially compelling and discussable.—Carolyn Lehman, Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA
Kirkus Reviews
Oliver's artfully detailed prose reveals, brick by brick, the sturdy dramatic foundation of an initially implausible premise. In her dystopian America, love has been outlawed as the life-threatening source of all discord. Citizens submit at the age of 18 to a neurological procedure that "cures" them of amor deliria nervosa, the chief symptoms of which are passionate feelings about anything. Poetry and contact between members of opposite sexes are forbidden; the authoritarian government rules with suspicion, violence and bureaucratically arranged marriages. As Lena, the soon-to-be-18 narrator, approaches the date of her procedure with both trepidation and relief, she meets Alex, a boy who inspires feelings that upend everything she has believed about her community and herself. Lena's gradual awakening is set against a convincing backdrop of totalitarian horror. Chilling epigraphs from the government's rewritten histories begin each chapter, providing contextual propaganda so thorough that they've even reinterpreted the Bible to suit their message. The abrupt ending leaves enough unanswered questions to set breathless readers up for volume two of this trilogy. (Science fiction. 14 & up)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061726835
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 2/7/2012
  • Series: Delirium Series , #1
  • Pages: 480
  • Sales rank: 387
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Lauren Oliver

Lauren Oliver is the author of the YA novel Before I Fall and the Delirium trilogy: Delirium, Pandemonium, and Requiem, which have been translated into more than thirty languages and are New York Times and international bestselling novels. She is also the author of two novels for middle-grade readers, The Spindlers and Liesl & Po, which was a 2012 E. B. White Read-Aloud Award nominee. A graduate of the University of Chicago and NYU's MFA program, Lauren Oliver lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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Read an Excerpt

One

The most dangerous sicknesses are those that make us believe we are well.
—Proverb 42, The Book of Shhh

It has been sixty-four years since the president and the Consortium identified love as a disease, and forty-three since the scientists perfected a cure. Everyone else in my family has had the procedure already. My older sister, Rachel, has been disease free for nine years now. She’s been safe from love for so long, she says she can’t even remember its symptoms. I’m scheduled to have my procedure in exactly ninety-five days, on September 3. My birthday.

Many people are afraid of the procedure. Some people even resist. But I’m not afraid. I can’t wait. I would have it done tomorrow, if I could, but you have to be at least eighteen, sometimes a little older, before the scientists will cure you. Otherwise the procedure won’t work correctly: People end up with brain damage, partial paralysis, blindness, or worse.

I don’t like to think that I’m still walking around with the disease running through my blood. Sometimes I swear I can feel it, writhing in my veins like something spoiled, like sour milk. It makes me feel dirty. It reminds me of children throwing tantrums. It reminds me of resistance, of diseased girls dragging their nails on the pavement, tearing out their hair, their mouths dripping spit.

And of course it reminds me of my mother.

After the procedure I will be happy and safe forever. That’s what everybody says, the scientists and my sister and Aunt Carol. I will have the procedure and then I’ll be paired with a boy the evaluators choose for me. In a few years, we’ll get married. Recently I’ve started having dreams about my wedding. In them I’m standing under a white canopy with flowers in my hair. I’m holding hands with someone, but whenever I turn to look at him his face blurs, like a camera losing focus, and I can’t make out any features. But his hands are cool and dry, and my heart is beating steadily in my chest—and in my dream I know it will always beat out that same rhythm, not skip or jump or swirl or go faster, just womp, womp, womp, until I’m dead.

Safe, and free from pain.

Things weren’t always as good as they are now. In school we learned that in the old days, the dark days, people didn’t realize how deadly a disease love was. For a long time they even viewed it as a good thing, something to be celebrated and pursued. Of course that’s one of the reasons it’s so dangerous: It affects your mind so that you cannot think clearly, or make rational decisions about your own well-being. (That’s symptom number twelve, listed in the amor deliria nervosa section of the twelfth edition of The Safety, Health, and Happiness Handbook, or The Book of Shhh, as we call it.) Instead people back then named other diseases—stress, heart disease, anxiety, depression, hypertension, insomnia, bipolar disorder—never realizing that these were, in fact, only symptoms that in the majority of cases could be traced back to the effects of amor deliria nervosa.

Of course we aren’t yet totally free from the effects of the deliria in the United States. Until the procedure has been perfected, until it has been made safe for the under-eighteens, we will never be totally protected. It still moves around us with invisible, sweeping tentacles, choking us. I’ve seen countless uncureds dragged to their procedures, so racked and ravaged by love that they would rather tear their eyes out, or try to impale themselves on the barbed-wire fences outside of the laboratories, than be without it.

Several years ago on the day of her procedure, one girl managed to slip from her restraints and find her way to the laboratory roof. She dropped quickly, without screaming. For days afterward, they broadcast the image of the dead girl’s face on television to remind us of the dangers of the deliria. Her eyes were open and her neck was twisted at an unnatural angle, but from the way her cheek was resting against the pavement you might otherwise think she had lain down to take a nap. Surprisingly, there was very little blood—just a small dark trickle at the corners of her mouth.

Ninety-five days, and then I’ll be safe. I’m nervous, of course. I wonder whether the procedure will hurt. I want to get it over with. It’s hard to be patient. It’s hard not to be afraid while I’m still uncured, though so far the deliria hasn’t touched me yet.

Still, I worry. They say that in the old days, love drove people to madness. That’s bad enough. The Book of Shhh also tells stories of those who died because of love lost or never found, which is what terrifies me the most.

The deadliest of all deadly things: It kills you both when you have it, and when you don’t.

Two

We must be constantly on guard against the Disease; the health of our nation, our people, our families, and our minds depends on constant vigilance.
—“Basic Health Measures,” The Safety, Health, and Happiness Handbook, 12th edition

The smell of oranges has always reminded me of funerals. On the morning of my evaluation it is the smell that wakes me up. I look at the clock on the bedside table. It’s six o’clock.

The light is gray, the sunlight just strengthening along the walls of the bedroom I share with both of my cousin Marcia’s children. Grace, the younger one, is crouched on her twin bed, already dressed, watching me. She has a whole orange in one hand. She is trying to gnaw on it, like an apple, with her little kid’s teeth. My stomach twists, and I have to close my eyes again to keep from remembering the hot, scratchy dress I was forced to wear when my mother died; to keep from remembering the murmur of voices, a large rough hand passing me orange after orange to suck on, so that I would stay quiet. At the funeral I ate four oranges, section by section, and when I was left with only a pile of peelings heaped on my lap I began to suck on those, the bitter taste of the pith helping to keep the tears away.

I open my eyes and Grace leans forward, the orange cupped in her outstretched palm.

“No, Gracie.” I push off my covers and stand up. My stomach is clenching and unclenching like a fist. “And you’re not supposed to eat the peel, you know.”

She continues blinking up at me with her big gray eyes, not saying anything. I sigh and sit down next to her. “Here,” I say, and show her how to peel the orange using her nail, unwinding bright orange curls and dropping them in her lap, the whole time trying to hold my breath against the smell. She watches me in silence. When I’m finished she holds the orange, now unpeeled, in both hands, as though it’s a glass ball and she’s worried about breaking it.

I nudge her. “Go ahead. Eat now.” She just stares at it and I sigh and begin separating the sections for her, one by one. As I do I whisper, as gently as possible, “You know, the others would be nicer to you if you would speak once in a while.” She doesn’t respond. Not that I really expect her to. My aunt Carol hasn’t heard her say a word in the whole six years and three months of Grace’s life—not a single syllable. Carol thinks there’s something wrong with her brain, but so far the doctors haven’t found it. “She’s as dumb as a rock,” Carol said matter-of-factly, just the other day, watching Grace turn a bright-colored block over and over in her hands, as though it was beautiful and miraculous, as though she expected it to turn suddenly into something else.

I stand up and go toward the window, moving away from Grace and her big, staring eyes and thin, quick fingers. I feel sorry for her.

Marcia, Grace’s mother, is dead now. She always said she never wanted children in the first place. That’s one of the downsides of the procedure; in the absence of deliria nervosa, some people find parenting distasteful. Thankfully, cases of full-blown detachment—where a mother or father is unable to bond normally, dutifully, and responsibly with his or her children, and winds up drowning them or sitting on their windpipes or beating them to death when they cry—are few. But two was the number of children the evaluators decided on for Marcia. At the time it seemed like a good choice. Her family had earned high stabilization marks in the annual review. Her husband, a scientist, was well respected. They lived in an enormous house on Winter Street. Marcia cooked every meal from scratch, and taught piano lessons in her spare time, to keep busy.

But, of course, when Marcia’s husband was suspected of being a sympathizer, everything changed. Marcia and her children, Jenny and Grace, had to move back with Marcia’s mother, my Aunt Carol, and people whispered and pointed at them everywhere they went. Grace wouldn’t remember that, of course; I’d be surprised if she has any memories of her parents at all.

Marcia’s husband disappeared before his trial could begin. It’s probably a good thing he did. The trials are mostly for show. Sympathizers are almost always executed. If not, they’re locked away in the Crypts to serve three life sentences, back-to-back. Marcia knew that, of course. Aunt Carol thinks that’s the reason her heart gave out only a few months after her husband’s disappearance, when she was indicted in his place. A day after she got served the papers she was walking down the street and—bam! Heart attack.

Hearts are fragile things. That’s why you have to be so careful.

It will be hot today, I can tell. It’s already hot in the bedroom, and when I crack the window to sweep out the smell of orange, the air outside feels as thick and heavy as a tongue. I suck in deeply, inhaling the clean smell of seaweed and damp wood, listening to the distant cries of the seagulls as they circle endlessly, somewhere beyond the low gray sloping buildings, over the bay. Outside, a car engine guns to life. The sound startles me, and I jump.

“Nervous about your evaluation?”

I turn around. My aunt Carol is standing in the doorway, her hands folded.

“No,” I say, though this is a lie.

She smiles, just barely, a brief flitting thing. “Don’t worry. You’ll be fine. Take your shower and then I’ll help you with your hair. We can review your answers on the way.”

“Okay.” My aunt continues to stare at me. I squirm, digging my nails into the windowsill behind me. I’ve always hated being looked at. Of course, I’ll have to get used to it. During the exam there will be four evaluators staring at me for close to two hours. I’ll be wearing a flimsy plastic gown, semitranslucent, like the kind you get in hospitals, so that they can see my body.

“A seven or an eight, I would say,” my aunt says, puckering her lips. It’s a decent score and I’d be happy with it. “Though you won’t get more than a six if you don’t get cleaned up.”

Senior year is almost over, and the evaluation is the final test I will take. For the past four months I’ve had all my various board exams—math, science, oral and written proficiency, sociology and psychology and photography (a specialty elective)—and I should be getting my scores sometime in the next few weeks. I’m pretty sure I did well enough to get assigned to a college. I’ve always been a decent student. The academic assessors will analyze my strengths and weaknesses, and then assign me to a school and a major.

The evaluation is the last step, so I can get paired. In the coming months the evaluators will send me a list of four or five approved matches. One of them will become my husband after I graduate college (assuming I passed all my boards. Girls who don’t pass get paired and married right out of high school). The evaluators will do their best to match me with people who received a similar score in the evaluations. As much as possible they try to avoid any huge disparities in intelligence, temperament, social background, and age. Of course you do hear occasional horror stories: cases where a poor eighteen-year-old girl is given to a wealthy eighty-year-old man.

The stairs let out their awful moaning, and Grace’s sister, Jenny, appears. She is nine and tall for her age, but very thin: all angles and elbows, her chest caving in like a warped sheet pan. It’s terrible to say, but I don’t like her very much. She has the same pinched look as her mother did.

She joins my aunt in the doorway and stares at me. I am only five-two and Jenny is, amazingly, just a few inches shorter than I am now. It’s silly to feel self-conscious in front of my aunt and cousins, but a hot, crawling itch begins to work its way up my arms. I know they’re all worried about my performance at the evaluation. It’s critical that I get paired with someone good. Jenny and Grace are years away from their procedures. If I marry well, in a few years it will mean extra money for the family. It might also make the whispers go away, singsong snatches that four years after the scandal still seem to follow us wherever we go, like the sound of rustling leaves carried on the wind: Sympathizer. Sympathizer. Sympathizer.

It’s only slightly better than the other word that followed me for years after my mom’s death, a snakelike hiss, undulating, leaving its trail of poison: Suicide. A sideways word, a word that people whisper and mutter and cough: a word that must be squeezed out behind cupped palms or murmured behind closed doors. It was only in my dreams that I heard the word shouted, screamed.

I take a deep breath, then duck down to pull the plastic bin from under my bed so that my aunt won’t see I’m shaking. “Is Lena getting married today?” Jenny asks my aunt. Her voice has always reminded me of bees droning flatly in the heat.

“Don’t be stupid,” my aunt says, but without irritation. “You know she can’t marry until she’s cured.”

I take my towel from the bin and straighten up, hugging the towel to my chest. That word—marry—makes my mouth go dry. Everyone marries as soon as they are done with their education. It’s the way things are. “Marriage is Order and Stability, the mark of a Healthy society.” (See The Book of Shhh, “Fundamentals of Society,” p. 114). But the thought of it still makes my heart flutter frantically, like an insect behind glass. I’ve never touched a boy, of course—physical contact between uncureds of opposite sex is forbidden.

Honestly, I’ve never even talked to a boy for longer than five minutes, unless you count my cousins and uncle and Andrew Marcus, who helps my uncle at the Stop-N-Save and is always picking his nose and wiping his snot on the underside of the canned vegetables.

And if I don’t pass my boards—please God, please God, let me pass them—I’ll have my wedding as soon as I’m cured, in less than three months. Which means I’ll have my wedding night.

The smell of oranges is still strong, and my stomach does another swoop. I bury my face in my towel and inhale, willing myself not to be sick.

From downstairs there is the clatter of dishes. My aunt sighs and checks her watch.

“We have to leave in less than an hour,” she says. “You’d better get moving.”

Three

Lord, help us root our feet to the earth
And our eyes to the road
And always remember the fallen angels
Who, attempting to soar,
Were seared instead by the sun and, wings melting,
Came crashing back to the sea.
Lord, help root my eyes to the earth
And stay my eyes to the road
So I may never stumble.

—Psalm 42

My aunt insists on walking me down to the laboratories, which, like all the government offices, are lumped together along the wharves: a string of bright white buildings, glistening like teeth over the slurping mouth of the ocean. When I was little and had just moved in with her, she used to walk me to school every day. My mother, sister, and I had lived closer to the border, and I was amazed and terrified by all the winding, darkened streets, which smelled like garbage and old fish. I always wished for my aunt to hold my hand, but she never did, and I had balled my hands into fists and followed the hypnotic swish of her corduroy pants, dreading the moment that St. Anne’s Academy for Girls would rise up over the crest of the final hill, the dark stone building lined with fissures and cracks like the weather-beaten face of one of the industrial fishermen who work along the docks.

It’s amazing how things change. I’d been terrified of the streets of Portland, then, and reluctant to leave my aunt’s side. Now I know them so well I could follow their dips and curves with my eyes closed, and today I want nothing more than to be alone. I can smell the ocean, though it’s concealed from view by the twisting undulations of the streets, and it relaxes me. The salt blowing off the sea makes the air feel textured and heavy.

“Remember,” she is saying, for the thousandth time. “They want to know about your personality, yes, but the more generalized your answers the better chance you have of being considered for a variety of positions.” My aunt has always talked about marriage with words straight out of The Book of Shhh, words like duty, responsibility, and perseverance. “Got it,” I say. A bus barrels past us. The crest for St. Anne’s Academy is stenciled along its side and I duck my head quickly, imagining Cara McNamara or Hillary Packer staring out the dirt-encrusted windows, giggling and pointing at me. Everyone knows I am having my evaluation today. Only four are offered throughout the year, and slots are determined well in advance.

The makeup Aunt Carol insisted I wear makes my skin feel coated and slick. In the bathroom mirror at home, I thought I looked like a fish, especially with my hair all pinned with metal bobby pins and clips: a fish with a bunch of metal hooks sticking in my head.

I don’t like makeup, have never been interested in clothes or lip gloss. My best friend, Hana, thinks I’m crazy, but of course she would. She’s absolutely gorgeous—even when she just twists her blond hair into a messy knot on the top of her head, she looks as though she’s just had it styled. I’m not ugly, but I’m not pretty, either. Everything is in between. I have eyes that aren’t green or brown but a muddle. I’m not thin, but I’m not fat, either. The only thing you could definitely say about me is this: I’m short.

“If they ask you, God forbid, about your cousins, remember to say that you didn’t know them well. . . .”

“Uh-huh.” I’m only half listening. It’s hot, too hot for June, and sweat is pricking up already on my lower back and in my armpits, even though I slathered on deodorant this morning. To our right is Casco Bay, which is hemmed in by Peaks Island and Great Diamond Island, where the lookout towers are. Beyond that is open ocean—and beyond that, all the crumbling countries and cities ruined by the disease.

“Lena? Are you even listening to me?” Carol puts a hand on my arm and spins me in her direction.

“Blue,” I parrot back at her. “Blue is my favorite color. Or green.” Black is too morbid; red will set them on edge; pink is too juvenile; orange is freakish.

“And the things you like to do in your free time?” I gently slip away from her grasp. “We’ve gone over this already.”

“This is important, Lena. Possibly the most important day of your whole life.”

I sigh. Ahead of me the gates that bar the government labs swing open slowly with a mechanized whine. There is already a double line forming: on one side, the girls, and fifty feet away, at a second entrance, the boys. I squint against the sun, trying to locate people I know, but the ocean has dazzled me and my vision is clouded by floating black spots.

“Lena?” my aunt prompts me.

I take a deep breath and launch into the spiel we’ve rehearsed a billion times. “I like to work on the school paper. I’m interested in photography because I like the way it captures and preserves a single moment of time. I enjoy hanging out with my friends and attending concerts at Deering Oaks Park. I like to run and was a co-captain of the cross-country team for two years. I hold the school record in the 5K event. I often babysit the younger members of my family, and I really like children.”

“You’re making a face,” my aunt says.

“I love children,” I repeat, plastering a smile on my face. The truth is, I don’t like very many children except for Gracie. They’re so bumpy and loud all the time, and they’re always grabbing things and dribbling and wetting themselves. But I know I’ll have to have children of my own someday.

“Better,” Carol says. “Go on.”

I finish, “My favorite subjects are math and history,” and she nods, satisfied.

“Lena!”

I turn around. Hana is just climbing out of her parents’ car, her blond hair flying in wisps and waves around her face, her semi-sheer tunic slipping off one tan shoulder. All the girls and boys lining up to enter the labs have turned to watch her. Hana has that kind of power over people.

“Lena! Wait!” Hana continues barreling down the street, waving at me frantically. Behind her, the car begins a slow revolution: back and forth, back and forth, in the narrow drive until it is facing the opposite direction. Hana’s parents’ car is as sleek and dark as a panther. The few times we’ve driven around in it together I’ve felt like a princess. Hardly anyone has cars anymore, and even fewer have cars that actually drive. Oil is is strictly rationed and extremely expensive. Some middle-class people keep cars mounted in front of their houses like statues, frigid and unused, the tires spotless and unworn. “Hi, Carol,” Hana says breathlessly, catching up to us. A magazine pops out of her half-open bag, and she stoops to retrieve it. It’s one of the government publications, Home and Family, and in response to my raised eyebrows she makes a face. “Mom made me bring it. She said I should read it while I’m waiting for my evaluation. She said it will give the right impression.” Hana sticks her finger down her throat and mimes gagging.

“Hana,” my aunt whispers fiercely. The anxiety in her voice makes my heart skip. Carol hardly ever loses her temper, even for a minute. She whips her head in both directions, as though expecting to find regulators or evaluators lurking in the bright morning street.

“Don’t worry. They’re not spying on us.” Hana turns her back to my aunt and mouths to me, Yet. Then she grins.

In front of us, the double line of girls and boys is growing longer, extending into the street, even as the glass-fronted doors of the labs swoosh open and several nurses appear, carrying clipboards, and begin to usher people into the waiting rooms. My aunt rests one hand on my elbow lightly, quick as a bird.

“You’d better get on line,” she says. Her voice is back to normal. I wish some of her calmness would rub off on me.

“And Lena?”

“Yeah?” I don’t feel very well. The labs look far away, so white I can hardly stand to look at them, the pavement shimmering hot in front of us. The words most important day of your life keep repeating in my head. The sun feels like a giant spotlight. “Good luck.” My aunt does her one-millisecond smile.

“Thanks.” I kind of wish Carol would say something else—something like, I’m sure you’ll do great, or Try not to worry—but she just stands there, blinking, her face composed and unreadable as always.

“Don’t worry, Mrs. Tiddle.” Hana winks at me. “I’ll make sure she doesn’t screw up too badly. Promise.”

All my nervousness dissipates. Hana is so relaxed about the whole thing, so nonchalant and normal.

Hana and I go down toward the labs together. Hana is almost five-nine. When I walk next to her I have to do a half skip every other step to keep up with her, and I wind up feeling like a duck bobbing up and down in the water. Today I don’t mind, though. I’m glad she’s with me. I’d be a complete wreck otherwise.

“God,” she says, as we get close to the lines. “Your aunt takes this whole thing pretty seriously, huh?”

“Well, it is serious.” We join the back of the line. I see a few people I recognize: some girls I know vaguely from school; some guys I’ve seen playing soccer behind Spencer Prep, one of the boys’ schools. A boy looks my way and sees me staring. He raises his eyebrows and I drop my eyes quickly, my face going hot all at once and a nervous itch working in my stomach. You’ll be paired in less than three months, I tell myself, but the words don’t mean anything and seem ridiculous, like one of the Mad Libs games we played as children that always resulted in nonsensical statements: I want banana for speedboat. Give my wet shoe to your blistering cupcake.

“Yeah, I know. Trust me, I’ve read The Book of Shhh as much as anyone.” Hana pushes her sunglasses up onto her forehead and bats her eyelashes at me, making her voice supersweet: “‘Evaluation Day is the exciting rite of passage that prepares you for a future of happiness, stability, and partnership.’” She drops her sunglasses back down on her nose and makes a face.

“You don’t believe it?” I lower my voice to a whisper.

Hana has been strange recently. She was always different from other people—more outspoken, more independent, more fearless. It’s one of the reasons I first wanted to be her friend. I’ve always been shy, and afraid that I’ll say or do the wrong thing. Hana is the opposite.

But lately it’s been more than that. She’s stopped caring about school, for one thing, and has been called to the principal’s office several times for talking back to the teachers. And sometimes in the middle of talking she’ll stop, just shut her mouth as though she’s run up against a barrier. Other times I’ll catch her staring out at the ocean as though she’s thinking of swimming away.

Looking at her now, at her clear gray eyes and her mouth as thin and taut as a bowstring, I feel a tug of fear. I think of my mother floundering for a second in the air before dropping like a stone into the ocean; I think about the face of the girl who dropped from the laboratory roof all those years ago, her cheek turned against the pavement. I will away thoughts of the illness. Hana isn’t sick. She can’t be. I would know. “If they really want us to be happy, they’d let us pick ourselves,” Hana grumbles.

“Hana,” I say sharply. Criticizing the system is the worst offense there is. “Take it back.”

She holds up her hands. “All right, all right. I take it back.”

“You know it doesn’t work. Look how it was in the old days. Chaos all the time, fighting, and war. People were miserable.”

“I said, I take it back.” She smiles at me, but I’m still mad and I look away.

“Besides,” I go on, “they do give us a choice.”

Usually the evaluators generate a list of four or five approved matches, and you are allowed to pick among them. This way, everyone is happy. In all the years that the procedure has been administered and the marriages arranged, there have been less than a dozen divorces in Maine, less than a thousand in the entire United States—and in almost all those cases, either the husband or wife was suspected of being a sympathizer and divorce was necessary and approved by the state.

“A limited choice,” she corrects me. “We get to choose from the people who have been chosen for us.”

“Every choice is limited,” I snap. “That’s life.”

She opens her mouth as though she’s going to respond, but instead she just starts to laugh. Then she reaches down and squeezes my hand, two quick pumps and then two long ones. It’s our old sign, a habit we developed in the second grade when one of us was scared or upset, a way of saying, I’m here, don’t worry.

“Okay, okay. Don’t get defensive. I love the evaluations, okay? Long live Evaluation Day.”

“That’s better,” I say, but I’m still feeling anxious and annoyed. The line shuffles slowly forward. We pass the iron gates, with their complicated crown of barbed wire, and enter the long driveway that leads to the various lab complexes. We are headed for Building 6-C. The boys go to 6-B, and the lines begin to curve away from each other.

As we move closer to the front of the line, we get a blast of air-conditioning every time the glass doors slide open and then hum shut. It feels amazing, like being momentarily dipped head to toe in a thin sheet of ice, popsicle-style, and I turn around and lift my ponytail away from my neck, wishing it weren’t so damn hot. We don’t have air-conditioning at home, just tall, gawky fans that are always sputtering out in the middle of the night. And most of the time Carol won’t even let us use those; they suck up too much electricity, she says, and we don’t have any to spare.

At last there are only a few people in front of us. A nurse comes out of the building, carrying a stack of clipboards and a handful of pens, and begins distributing them along the line. “Please make sure to fill out all required information,” she says, “including your medical and family history.”

My heart begins to work its way up into my throat. The neatly numbered boxes on the page—Last Name, First Name, Middle Initial, Current Address, Age—collapse together. I’m glad Hana is in front of me. She begins filling out the forms quickly, resting the clipboard on her forearm, her pen skating over the paper.

“Next.”

The doors whoosh open again, and a second nurse appears and gestures for Hana to come inside. In the dark coolness beyond her, I can see a bright white waiting room with a green carpet.

“Good luck,” I say to Hana.

She turns and gives me a quick smile. But I can tell she is nervous, finally. There is a fine crease between her eyebrows, and she is chewing on the corner of her lip.

She starts to enter the lab and then turns abruptly and walks back to me, her face wild and unfamiliar-looking, grabbing me with both shoulders, putting her mouth directly to my ear. I’m so startled I drop my clipboard.

“You know you can’t be happy unless you’re unhappy sometimes, right?” she whispers, and her voice is hoarse, as though she’s just been crying.

“What?” Her nails are digging into my shoulders, and at that moment I’m terrified of her.

“You can’t be really happy unless you’re unhappy sometimes. You know that, right?”

Before I can respond she releases me, and as she pulls away, her face is as serene and beautiful and composed as ever. She bends down to scoop up my clipboard, which she passes to me, smiling. Then she turns around and is gone behind the glass doors, which open and close behind her as smoothly as the surface of water, sucking closed over something that is sinking.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 1812 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 17, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Oliver captivated my heart with Delirium!

    Delirium had me from the first sentence: "It has been sixty-four years since the president and the Consortium identified love as a disease, and forty-three since the scientists perfected a cure." I thought to myself, this is going to end badly. And I didn't mean it as the book was going to suck, I meant that it was going to end with me in pain for these characters. That prediction was dead on.

    Lena's life has never been normal. Her family has been surrounded by controversy due to her mother committing suicide when Lena was six and her cousin's husband being identified as a sympathizer. She now lives with her aunt Carol, tries to follow all the rules and stay under the radar. She is counting down the days to when she can receive the procedure that will forever take away all the pain and memories of everything that has haunted her all her life. For Lena, the procedure will mean a fresh start. A new, normal life. But how could she want anything different if she really doesn't know what love, the disease, could truly bring to her life. To her, all it has brought is abandonment.

    Enter Alex, with his hair the color of autumn leaves and his bright amber eyes. He is gorgeous, sweet and fun. They begin this incredible forbidden relationship full of love, trust and kisses. Lots of kisses. :D He shows her what love is really like.

    So what does she do now? Go on with life as planned, get "cured" and live out her predetermined future or risk it all for love, for Alex? The ending will leave your heart racing and, I daresay, broken.

    With all that being said, I absolutely loved this book! That's the best I can do on describing how I feel about it. I cannot wait to read the next book in this series, as the cliffhanger is hard to bear, but I guess I'll have to suffer along with everyone else. It was a page turner from start to finish and I suggest you go out and read it...now!! :)

    129 out of 137 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 3, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    great

    Loved Delirium. kept me entertained all the way through.

    79 out of 92 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 2, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Exquisite and Stunning - This Is What Love Is

    This is possibly one of the most difficult reviews I've ever written because, like many other people, I have been infected with amor deliria nervosa. Meaning: I loved this book.

    Delirium was an exquisite read. Lena's life, her world, is one of control and awareness. Her mother committed suicide when she was younger because she was afflicted with amor deliria nervosa - Lena vows to never be like that. She fears the procedure that will change her life forever, but she also welcomes it, wanting the normalcy that it will provide. Upon meeting Alex, a cured boy, things begin to change and Lena starts to see her world for what it really is.

    Lauren Oliver has crafted this dystopian world that, on the surface, does not appear harsh or cruel or bad. But underneath, below the blank faces and the shiny atmosphere, is a world where people are losing their emotions, the feelings cut right out of them. The setting of Portland, Maine is a character all on its own. I felt like I was right there, in Portland, smelling the ocean and feeling the salt on my skin. Oliver's writing is, for lack of a better word, breathtaking. Her characters are so human and filled with the life that the cure takes away.

    I was instantly taken with Lena and her desire to hold onto her mother's memory, but also to separate herself from it. She wants to be a good image in her family and knowing that the cure will tear her apart from her best friend Hana, is devastating. In Lena's world, love is a disease and diseases must be inoculated. When Lena begins to have deliria-like feelings for Alex, she begins to see reasons why there are Invalids and people who would rather die than lose themselves to the cure. It is terrifying and tragic and haunting and beautiful all at the same time.

    The premise of Delirium is so entirely captivating that I did not want to put the book down and I cannot stop thinking about it. Lena, Alex, Hana, even Gracie all tore into my heart and made me love them. If this is deliria, then I do not want the cure. Lauren Oliver's writing is stunning and the ending, oh, the ending, it killed me. I implore you to buy Delirium, open it the second you get it, and don't stop until you reach the back cover. It's amazing and incredible and this review does not do it justice.

    Opening line: It has been sixty-four years since the president and the Consortium identified love as a disease, and forty-three since the scientists perfected a cure. ~ pg. 9

    Favorite lines:
    Sometimes I feel like if you just watch things, just sit still and let the world exist in front of you - sometimes I swear that just for a second time freezes and the world pauses in its tilt. Just for a second. And if you somehow found a way to live in that second, then you would live forever. ~ pgs. 110-111

    And this one:

    As I lie there with the hurt driving through my chest and the sick, anxious feeling churning through me and the desire for Alex so strong inside of me it's like a razor blade edging its way through my organs, shredding me, all I can think is: It will kill me, it will kill me, it will kill me. And I don't care. ~ pg. 166
    *This is the e-ARC version and lines, pages, cover art may be subject to change before official publication

    41 out of 47 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 17, 2011

    Delirium + Lauren Oliver = AMAZING!

    I love this book. Right now this is my favorite book of all times. I just loved it! I finished it in two days and absolutely loved it. It was very emotional book. I laughed, smiled, and cried once at the end. But I loved it. Lauren Oliver is also my favorite writer of all times! I love this book!

    27 out of 39 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 7, 2011

    Amazing.

    This book was...I dont even know how to describe it. Delirium was just gorgeous. Lena is a great main charactar and she changes so much throughout the book. Alex is just perfect. Hes so amazing and of course Lena would fall in love with him! The whole idea that love is a disease is genius...Lauren Oliver is a great writer. Before I Fall was also a great book amd I cant wait to read more of her books...especially in the Delirium trilogy. This book is a must read!

    19 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Good Concept. Poorly Executed.

    When i read the back cover i immediately thought the story had a very interesting concept that got my attention. Kind of like a cross between Ally Condies "Matched" and Scott Westerfelds "Uglies". Gave it a good enough shot. Got to about chapter seven, and was NOT feeling the author at all. No disrespect to her, but she rambled on and on way too much. I started skimming a lot of the pages and eventually just said I'm done. It wasn't going anywhere. There's a good kind of rambling, like in the hunger games, that makes a point and has things to do with the story. And then there's nonsensical rambling that just makes me tired of reading, like jane eyre. I gave it enough time for it to get good but there wasn't enough dialogue. If you still wanna try it, maybe you like that kind of stuff, definitely read a good lil bit before you go and buy it.

    14 out of 31 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2011

    Beautiful

    I cried so much at the end. A beautiful love story, a sacrifce for love. I would definitely recommend.

    12 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 9, 2012

    Disappointed in the language

    I was looking for a new series to start and am disappointed in the use of the "F" word. I won't read the rest.

    11 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 1, 2011

    Not that good

    I am not really sure why so many people liked this book. I felt like the story was pretty thin. Not that much really happened in this book. There was too much time spent on overly describing aspects that did not add to the story. The part about Lena's mother being dead and then not really dead seemed pointless. I do not feel that book was written very well. It could have made a good short story but 300+ pages was too much because as I said earlier very little actually happened. I wish I would have passed on this book.

    9 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 20, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    WOW

    This book is great. They have found the cure for virus love. Everyone is required to be treated at 18. But not everyone thinks they should have the treatment. This first book in a trilogy sets up a world where scientists can remove the disease love, because love is an evil that must be eliminated. But not everyone thinks they should have the treatment. But it is more than love that is removed, it is emotion, pain, feeling. But is this the perfect world once the disease has been removed. Or is the Wilds, where the disease love still exists. Excellent read.

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 10, 2010

    Can Not Miss Teen Book Of 2011

    Lena has waited her whole childhood to become eligible for "the cure". To not feel pain, jealousy, want or more importantly LOVE. Love causes all the dangers in the united states. A united states without love is the best thing for all it's citizens. Lena grew up to believe this was true after watching her mother commit suicide, Lena is taught to believe that this is what happens when love takes control, it makes you do things, say things, feel things that you can not control and thus making you lose control of yourself and your actions. Lena has just a few months left when she reports for her boards, a test that will find her a mate and determine the rest of her life, how many children she will bear, if she will go to college, what her income will be etc. While taking her test she notices a boy in the observation deck watching her. Life takes many unexpected twists in this story and one of the biggest ones that Lena thought would never happen to her, she falls in love. Lena starts to feel things, do things and believe in things she thought were evil before. Alex teaches her that life doesn't have to begin with the cure but is already happening in the shadows of the Wild, where some of the uncured and invalids live, those who believe that a world without love is not a world anyone should want to live in. With time passing by getting closer and closer to her cure date Lena must decide if a world of predictability and going through the motions are right for her. Or if there is something else to live for, something else that a part of the United States has forgotten. Love. I honestly thanked my lucky stars I got an advanced readers copy of this book. Do not miss out on this title! Be sure to check out her other book "Before I Fall" as well!

    9 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2012

    CAUTION!

    I read this book because the plot looked intriguing. And it was. Then I started having a problem with it. I encountered a VERY strong profanity while reading this. It disappointed me so much. It was going to be such a great book. Ms. Oliver, why did you have to ruin this book?
    I would not recommend this book because of extremely questionable language.

    8 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 9, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    review taken from One Book At A Time

    Put me in the camp of those who weren't sure Lauren Oliver's next novel would top her debut Before I Fall. I think with this one, she proven she has something to offer the young adult genre and will be here to stay. While I have to say I didn't like it as much as Before I Fall, it is still one of the best books I've read this summer and right behind my 5 star books for the best of the year. I highly recommend getting it as soon as it's released.

    I've really enjoyed books set in a future society. Although, I'm not sure why it's always rigorously controlled by whatever government system is in place. It always works with the storyline though, and this one is no exception. I think it's because everyone is so afraid to break the rules, that when they do it makes it that much more exciting. I love how the characters believe they live in a Utopian society, when actually the opposite is probably true. I do have to admit that for half the story I thought it took place in Portland, Oregon. I had a hard time adjusting my thinking when I realized it was actually Portland, Maine.

    I grew to love Lena by the end of the story. Some characters push the rules from the very beginning of the story. Lena fights it every step of the way. She's trying her best to be a model citizen and accept what's society has chosen to give her. I think she hopes by doing this, she can overcome her own families failures. She doesn't want to be different. Alex is wonderful. I knew what he was, but was surprise at how well he seemed to blend into society. I loved how he pushed Lena into finding out what she really wanted. He was always right there when he needed her most. I also enjoyed watching Lena and Hanna's relationship evolve. At first they were trying to accept how their relationship will be different after they are both cured by stepping away from each other before their operations. But, then they realize that how they feel about their friendship now is just as important.

    The story itself is beautiful. Oliver has a way with story telling that just captures you from the first pages. I picked it up and finished it less than 24 hours later (I stopped to sleep lol). The ending left me breathless and craving more. The only reason I gave it 4 stars instead of 5 is some of the ideas of this society weren't entirely believable to me. The idea that people could be cured of loved but then expected to raise a family just didn't sit well with me (I didn't buy into the idea of not experiencing love would prevent such incidents as children being drowned in the bathtub as explained at one point). I also was reminded greatly of Uglies by Scott Westerfeld. The story lines were very similar.

    8 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 8, 2011

    One of my Favorite Books Ever!!!!!!!!

    I would recommend this book to any reader that loves romances and likes to get lost in another world. It takes a lot for a book to make me cry! Dilirium at the end was sooooooooo sad!! It is the best book ever!! i love this author i read before i fall by this author too:) that book was just as good as this one(: i cant wait for the next Lauren Oliver book to come out! i am definitely going to buy it.

    7 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2012

    This book is fantastic!!! Lauren Oliver I swear has just become

    This book is fantastic!!! Lauren Oliver I swear has just become one of my new favorite authors!!! I swear my stomach was in knots the entire time I was reading this book, because I just couldn't stop! I t sucked me in and then I was hooked! I think that I am suffering from PDD (post delirium depression)! I wish I would have found this book earlier!!! I recommend this book to EVERYONE!!! I know that some people said that they didn't like it, but I loved it because yeah the main thing in this story is love, but still there is a crazed future version of a government and people who have been literally brainwashed. SO read the book! don't just listen to the comments make your own!!!!!! :)

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2011

    Sacrifice for Love

    Delirium is beautiful, heart breaking, mysterious which will draw the reader in. The main character, Lena lives in a world where love is seen as a terrible disease. It is seen as an infection that can be caught. Lena is obedient to what the goverment tells her and believes everything which is told to her. This all changes when she meets a boy named Alex. Lena learns what it is like to love and feels the pain. Risking her life many times just so she can be with him. When I was read the end of Delirium I was bursting in to tears. I just sat there wishing that somehow magically Lena and Alex could have somehow escaped the fence together and live a long, happy life filled with love. Then Alex would read her poetry each day and tell of all the fairy tales.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 15, 2011

    Horribly Upsetting!

    This book starts off like Matched. But a little better. Then as it goes on you realize the theme is like Romeo and Juliet. At the end you think "They'll be saved! They'll be saved!" But the ending is total crap and was so upsetting and horrible, i couldnt even cry. Before I Fall is amazing, but please, I beg you!!! DON'T READ IT!

    6 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2011

    BAD

    If I could give this book no stars I would.

    I read Lauren Oliver's first book, Before I Fall, and fell in love with it. It was a great book. When I learned she was going to release a new novel, I was so excited to read it!

    This book has a good concept, but it's executed poorly. The main character's love is not believable at all. I find this book incredibly annoying and I found me forcing myself to read it (I didn't finish it by the way- I skipped a couple chapters in the end and read the last couple pages, which I never do).

    It's a good book if you want to have a typical teenage romance novel. If you don't, pick up another book.

    6 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 27, 2012

    ...

    ...I thought this would be the "It" book. The kind that will keep me interested til the end. The kind of book that I will remember 4 the rest of my life.

    ...None of that happened.

    ...When I first read the plot, I thought that I would enjoy Delirium. It seemed interesting. The city Lena lives is like any other city. I did not see a hint of dystopian or other stuff that looked from the future. I rarely read dystopians unless the technology is understandable.

    ...As I started reading, the story seemed to be interesting. The more I got into it, the more boring it got. Lena was always complaining. She didn't appeal to me as a strong heroine. She was boring and depressing. So were the other characters except Hana. Hana was the one I could relate to. She was the only character who appealed to me.

    ...All in all, this book was a no no in my perspective. I guessed I bought it because of all the hype it got. Note to self: Never buy a book that has too much hype. Also because I read Matched by Ally Condie and was hoping it would be the same. It wasn't. Matched was a million times better.

    ...The love took over the entire plot. When I read a book, I want the story to keep me interested. When love takes over, the story is boring. page after page, Lena always talked about love. Boring.

    ...If you want to read Delirium, go on and read. I don't want my review to give you a 2nd thought.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2012

    Mixture

    I love this book! Although to me it felt like Uglies and Matched rolled together.......but still pretty good book!! :)

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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