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Destination Void
     

Destination Void

3.2 9
by Frank Herbert
 

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The starship Earthling, filled with thousands of hybernating colonists en route to a new world at Tau Ceti, is stranded beyond the solar system when the ship's three Organic Mental Cores--disembodied human brains that control the vessel's functions--go insane. An emergency skeleton crew sees only one chance for survival: to create an artificial consciousness in the

Overview

The starship Earthling, filled with thousands of hybernating colonists en route to a new world at Tau Ceti, is stranded beyond the solar system when the ship's three Organic Mental Cores--disembodied human brains that control the vessel's functions--go insane. An emergency skeleton crew sees only one chance for survival: to create an artificial consciousness in the Earthling's primary computer, which could guide them to their destination . . . or could destroy the human race.

Frank Herbert's classic novel that begins the epic Pandora Sequence (written with Bill Ransom), which also includes The Jesus Incident, The Lazarus Effect, and The Ascension Factor.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940012972446
Publisher:
WordFire Press
Publication date:
06/12/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
215,737
File size:
519 KB

Meet the Author

Frank Herbert (1920-1986) created the most beloved novel in the annals of science fiction, DUNE. He was a man of many facets, of countless passageways that ran through an intricate mind. His magnum opus is a reflection of this, a classic work that stands as one of the most complex, multi-layered novels ever written in any genre. Today the novel is more popular than ever, with new readers continually discovering it and telling their friends to pick up a copy. It has been translated into dozens of languages and has sold almost 20 million copies.

As a child growing up in Washington state, Frank Herbert was curious about everything. He carried around a Boy Scout pack with books in it, and he was always reading. He loved Rover Boys adventures, as well as the stories of H.G. Wells, Jules Verne, and the science fiction of Edgar Rice Burroughs. On his eighth birthday, Frank stood on top of the breakfast table at his family home and announced,"I wanna be a author."

His maternal grandfather, John McCarthy, said of the boy, "It's frightening. A kid that small shouldn't be so smart." Young Frank was not unlike Alia in DUNE, a person having adult comprehension in a child's body. In grade school he was the acknowledged authority on everything. If his classmates wanted to know the answer to something, such as about sexual functions or how to make a carbide cannon, they would invariably say, "Let's ask Herbert. He'll know."

His curiosity and independent spirit got him into trouble more than once when he was growing up, and caused him difficulties as an adult as well. He did not graduate from college because he refused to take the required courses for a major; he only wanted to study what interested him. For years he had a hard time making a living, bouncing from job to job and from town to town. He was so independent that he refused to write for a particular market; he wrote what he felt like writing. It took him six years of research and writing to complete DUNE, and after all that struggle and sacrifice, 23 publishers rejected it in book form before it was finally accepted. He received an advance of only $7,500.

His loving wife of 37 years, Beverly, was the breadwinner much of the time, as an underpaid advertising writer for department stores. Having been divorced from his first wife, Flora Parkinson, Frank Herbert met Beverly Stuart at a University of Washington creative writing class in 1946. At the time they were the only students

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Destination Void 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Herbert is famous for his eon spanning galactic world building in Dune, but this is not that. This is a soft sci-fi dealing with the development of an AI in a very constrained environment. Herbert gives glimpses of the larger world he has built, but the focus is strictly on the characters involved. The pacing and tension is palpable. The story drove me to finish reading it quickly, and I was satisfied.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This ebook is not worth the price – written sometime in the 60's representing technology from the 1950's. The authors vague premonition of machine intelligence is at best child like and amateurish which actually stunts the readers imagination. If there is a better case for not extending copyright periods – this ebook best represents that case – this text should be in the public domain. Had I known then what I know now I would not have paid even $0.99 for it.
I_Am_Not_Akira More than 1 year ago
The story is an incredible read; clones on a ship trying to endure the rigors of space travel on their way to a planet in the Tau Ceti system. The NOOK digital version is a bit cumbersome on the eyes - there were a lot of typos and the formatting felt a bit skewed - but if you can get past that, it is a must-read for any Frank Herbert or SciFi fan.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
True to form.
outbackjoe More than 1 year ago
I completely forgot that Bill Ransom co-wrote this series with Frank Herbert. For anyone new to Herbert (who have read the Dune series), this shorter series is my favorite, as Bill Ransom adds significantly to Herbert's examination of human behavior. Don't let anybody tell you a word; it's better to hear it for yourself (assuming that little voice in your head is you, and not Ship).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Garbage. Reading scifi for over 50 years and this is second to the worst of thousands of books I've read.