Dressed to Kill

Dressed to Kill

5.0 2
Director: Brian De Palma, Michael Caine, Angie Dickinson, Nancy Allen

Cast: Brian De Palma, Michael Caine, Angie Dickinson, Nancy Allen

     
 

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One of Brian De Palma's most divisive films, Dressed to Kill is a spine-chilling Alfred Hitchcock update for the late 1970s. Sexually frustrated wife and mother Kate Miller (Angie Dickinson) visits her New York psychiatrist, Dr. Elliott (Michael Caine), to complain about her unfulfilling erotic life. When she then goes to meet her husband at a museum, she meets

Overview

One of Brian De Palma's most divisive films, Dressed to Kill is a spine-chilling Alfred Hitchcock update for the late 1970s. Sexually frustrated wife and mother Kate Miller (Angie Dickinson) visits her New York psychiatrist, Dr. Elliott (Michael Caine), to complain about her unfulfilling erotic life. When she then goes to meet her husband at a museum, she meets an anonymous man whom she follows out to a cab. After an afternoon of satisfying sex, Kate discovers that the man has a venereal disease, but that information becomes a moot point when a razor-wielding blonde woman slashes Kate to ribbons in the elevator of the man's building. Blonde prostitute Liz (Nancy Allen), who caught a glimpse of the murderer, becomes both the prime suspect and the killer's next target. With the police less than willing to believe her story, Liz joins forces with Kate's son Peter (Keith Gordon) to get the psychopath themselves.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
Just as Brian De Palma's Obsession rewrote Vertigo, Dressed To Kill rewrites Psycho. This time out, however, De Palma displays far more wit in an overhaul enjoyable for even those less immersed in Hitchcockiana than himself. Criticized for its sadism, the film might more accurately be described as an exploration of the sadism already implicit in Hitchcock's work, particularly in a bravura opening sequence featuring Angie Dickinson. Of course, how easily viewers let De Palma off the hook will depend on how literally they take the whole exercise. Certainly decades of advancement in gay rights date certain aspects of the film. But with De Palma it's best never to underestimate the satirical element, and here he combines his biting humor with some of the most thrilling suspense sequences of his career. It's a delicate balance that can produce such misfires as Body Double but when done right makes for a pretty thrilling ride.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/08/2015
UPC:
0715515154413
Original Release:
1980
Rating:
NR
Source:
Criterion
Region Code:
A
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Time:
1:45:00
Sales rank:
10,024

Special Features

New conversation between De Palma and filmmaker Noah Baumbach; New interviews with actor Nancy Allen, producer George Litto, composer Pino Donaggio, shower-scene body double Victoria Lynn Johnson, and poster photographic art director Stephen Sayadian; The making of "Dressed to Kill," a 2001 documentary; New profile of cinematographer Ralf Bode, featuring filmmaker Michael Apted; Interview with actor-director Keith Gordon from 2001; Pieces from 2001 about the different versions of the film and the cuts made to avoid an X rating; Gallery of storyboards by De Palma; Trailer

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Michael Caine Dr. Robert Elliott
Angie Dickinson Kate Miller
Nancy Allen Liz Blake
Keith Gordon Peter Miller
Dennis Franz Detective Marino
David Margulies Dr. Levy
Ken Baker Warren Lockman
Brandon Maggart Cleveland Sam
Mary Davenport Woman in Coffee Shop
Susanna Clemm Betty Luce
Norman Evans Ted
Bill Randolph Chase Cab Driver
Sean O'Rinn Museum Cab Driver
Fred Weber Mike Miller
Sam Williams Subway Cop
Robert Lee Rush Hood
Natalie Massara Conductor

Technical Credits
Brian De Palma Director,Screenwriter
Samuel Z. Arkoff Producer
Ralf Bode Cinematographer
Gary J. Brink Set Decoration/Design
Fred Caruso Associate Producer
Joe Cranzano Makeup
Pino Donaggio Score Composer
Jerry Greenberg Editor
Steve James Stunts
Gary Jones Costumes/Costume Designer
George Litto Producer
Natalie Massara Musical Direction/Supervision
Vic Ramos Casting
Michael Rauch Asst. Director
Ann Roth Costumes/Costume Designer
Gary Weist Production Designer

Videos

Customer Reviews

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Dressed to Kill 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Aside from 'Sisters' with the amazing Margot Kidder, paying homage to Hitchcock has never been as fun as this shockingly violent, sexually charged psychological thriller from Brian DePalma! Dressed to Kill is packed to the rafters with more bloody thrills and erotic chills than you can shake a straight razor at - not to mention a musical score that adds to the over all feel as well. Bravo to DePalma and Angie Dickenson as the sympathetic heroine in peril who (possibly) goes the way of Janet Leigh in Psycho. One gets the sense that with films like Black Dahlia he's longing to return to the erotic thriller genre. Let's hope he keeps trying. His penchant to take risks however, is far more evident in these early thrillers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A brillant erotic thriller full of symbolism, sex and slashing. Angie Dickinson is perfect as the frustrated wife starved for sexual fulfillment. Each facial expression and body movement 'telegraphs' her uncontrollable craving for sexual satisfaction. Every article of clothing she wears conveys the message, 'she is available on a moment's noitce'. The front-hook bra, the absence of pantyhose or garter belt, the soft white dress that unbuttons completely down the front, her half-slip and brief panties, and the very high heel open slingbacks all advertise her availability. As erotic as her cries of ecstasy and the writhing of her hungry body are in the cab scene, the brillant enchanting musical score by Pino Donaggio towers above them. The movements and dress of the 'slasher' appeared quite amateurish and detracted from the atmosphere of tension; however the actual slashing was most effective. Her prolonged self-gratification and rape fantasy in the opening shower scene were graphic yet tasteful and very effectively established her constant need for sexual relief. The lighting and sound at times were flawed, but the film is unquestionably the 'gold standard' of erotic thrillers.