BN.com Gift Guide

Invaders from Mars

( 3 )

Overview

William Cameron Menzies' 1953 science fiction thriller Invaders From Mars has previously been available only in highly substandard (and blessedly out-of-print) disc of dubious origin from United American Video -- now it comes to us in a Special Edition 50th Anniversary release from Image Entertainment that runs circles around all other home video releases of the movie. The transfer is cleaner, brighter, and sharper than the Image laserdisc edition from the early 1990's, and it also looks and sounds better than ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (DVD)
  • All (1) from $99.99   
  • Used (1) from $99.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$99.99
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(16228)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Like New
Wade Williams, 01/01/2002, DVD, Like New condition. DVD. Case Like New. Booklet Very Good. Quality guaranteed! In original artwork/packaging unless otherwise noted.

Ships from: Frederick, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

William Cameron Menzies' 1953 science fiction thriller Invaders From Mars has previously been available only in highly substandard (and blessedly out-of-print) disc of dubious origin from United American Video -- now it comes to us in a Special Edition 50th Anniversary release from Image Entertainment that runs circles around all other home video releases of the movie. The transfer is cleaner, brighter, and sharper than the Image laserdisc edition from the early 1990's, and it also looks and sounds better than any theatrical showing of the movie that this reviewer has attended from 1980 onward. It isn't a perfect transfer, for the obvious reason that the surviving materials for the film have been mishandled over the decades, but within the limits of those materials -- marred by a few vertical lines and some intermittent, slightly uneven color and soft focus in some shots -- the producers have done a wonderful job with this movie; even the night shots show good, even exceptional detail; the only flaw is the first shot depicting the Martian mutants, which is a little too dark to show what makes Dr.Blake (Helena Carter) scream; on the other hand, the cavern scenes are realistic in their tone and look of menace. And the the virtues of this disc aren't limited to the image -- the sound has about the greatest depth and impact of any showing of Invaders From Mars that this reviewer has ever seen. The movie is presented in both its original American edition and its 1954 British release edition, which had one long (and surprisingly good) additional scene in the middle and a different ending (a result of the UK distributor complaining about the 78 minute running time and the U.S. ending). The disc opens automatically to a cleverly designed menu that's pretty entertaining in its own right as one goes through several layers of selections, involving the two versions of the movie and the original trailer, as well as a five minute long montage of production stills, lobby cards, advertising art, and other graphics associated with the movie. The 20 chapters are well chosen and sufficient to break down the movie properly in all of its highlights. There's also a nicely written booklet that gives a detailed production history and preservation history of the film, which, with this DVD, has finally gotten the respect it deserves.
Read More Show Less

Special Features

U.S. and alternate British versions of the film; Brand-new digital transfer; Theatrical trailer; Still gallery; Illustrated collector's booklet
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
Invaders From Mars is one of those films that many people fondly recall seeing as a child, but have to laugh at a bit when they see it as adults. But while the primitive effects, pajama-costumed Martians, and second-rate cast don't inspire the chills they did in 1953, they still make for an entertaining trip down memory lane, even if the film seems like a potential candidate for a Mystery Science Theater 3000 treatment. Director William Cameron Menzies (who helmed the 1936 classic Things to Come) keeps things flowing and his art direction is quite good considering what must have been an extremely low budget. The picture opens strong as young Jimmy Hunt watches as a strange force takes control of everyone around him. Unfortunately, once the troops are deployed, very little of consequence happens until they finally break into the Martians' underground lair. The screenplay by Richard Blake must have run out of steam by this point as Menzies heavily pads the film's final reels with repetitive footage of running Martians, running soldiers, and the occasional explosion. A surprise ending is rather amusing, but takes away from the film's overall impact. The cast also reflects the low budget and their performances are routine, although Hillary Brooke as the boy's mother registers a classic '50s line when she says, "He's been reading those trashy science fiction magazines. He's completely out of control!" The special effects are simple, but effective with top honors going to a Martian ray gun that turns rock to molten liquid. The Martians themselves look like men wearing pajamas with the feet in them, and their leader is a head with tentacles who is mounted in a fishbowl. The film was remade in 1986 by director Tobe Hooper and featured Hunt as a police chief.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 12/3/2002
  • UPC: 014381136227
  • Original Release: 1953
  • Rating:

  • Source: Image Entertainment
  • Region Code: 1
  • Sound: Dolby Digital Mono
  • Language: English
  • Time: 1:19:00
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Helena Carter Dr. Patricia Blake
Arthur Franz Dr. Stuart Kelston
Jimmy Hunt David Maclean
Leif Erickson George MacLean
Hillary Brooke Mary MacLean
Morris Ankrum Col. Fielding
Max Wagner Sgt. Rinaldi
Janine Perreau Kathy Wilson
John Eldredge Mr. Turner
Lock Martin Mutant
Max Palmer Mutant
William Phipps
Luce Potter Martian Leader
Walter Sande Sgt. Finley
Robert Shayne Dr. Wilson
Milburn Stone Capt. Roth
Bert Freed Chief Barrows
Harry Monty Mutant
Technical Credits
William Cameron Menzies Director, Production Designer, Screenwriter
Edward L. Alperson Jr. Producer
John Tucker Battle Screenwriter
Richard Blake Screenwriter
Irving A. Block Special Effects
Jack Cosgrove Special Effects
Gene Hibbs Makeup
Raoul Kraushaar Score Composer
Boris Leven Art Director
Howard Lydecker Special Effects
Norma Costumes/Costume Designer
Jack R. Rabin Special Effects
Anatole Robbins Makeup
Arthur Roberts Editor
John F. Seitz Cinematographer
Read More Show Less

Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Main Title: Stargazers [4:02]
2. The Landing [2:44]
3. Dad Disappears [3:48]
4. "Dad" Returns [4:43]
5. Kathy Comes Home [1:52]
6. Looking for Help [4:05]
7. Dr. Blake [5:25]
8. Professor Kelston [6:29]
9. Military Action [4:14]
10. Rinaldi Sticks His Neck Out [4:18]
11. Sand Pit Surveillance [8:37]
12. The Sniper [3:19]
13. Into the Sand Pit [4:05]
14. "Mutants" [3:22]
15. The Martian Intelligence [3:43]
16. Man Vs. Martian [2:14]
17. Setting Charges [3:10]
18. Race Against Time [3:49]
19. Montage [2:28]
20. Full Circle [1:42]
Read More Show Less

Menu

Side #1 --
   Begin the Invasion
   Pick Your Battle
   Extra Invasions
      Theatrical Traier
      Still Gallery
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    An Afternoon Matinee Favorite

    'Invaders from Mars' (1953) is spooky fun. The 'men from Mars' concept has been done many times. This movie is interesting in that it is seen from the young boy's viewpoint. We feel his fear as he sees his parents possessed by the aliens. We share his frustration as he tries to convince other people of what is going on. Though the special effects aren't up to today's eye-popping standards they are sufficient to carry the story. The wierd choral music that plays every time some unsuspecting person gets sucked under the sandpit is particularly creepy. If you like entertaining science fiction that is suitable for the whole family (except possibly children under 6 years old) this one is worth a watch. Don't waste your time on the 1986 remake!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Beyond the Horizon

    William Cameron Menzies' "Invaders From Mars" (not to be confused with an offensive 80's Tobe Hooper retread) is a little gem of a film. The kind of movie that unfolds and is remembered as a troubling twilight half-dream that sticks in the back of your head and sends involuntary shivers down your back. A simple tale of alien invasion seen through the eyes of a twelve-year-old boy (Jimmy Hunt) who one night is awakened by what he thinks is a lightning flash but, he soon realizes, is actually a descending flying saucer which buries itself in a mysterious sandpit just over a slight hillside next to his house. Naturally, being a child, no one believes him, and he begins to doubt himself until... The film resembles a prescient version of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" through a child's eyes, and in the escalating events in which the invaders begin their takeover, the film becomes a fascinating study of childhood angst in fears of abandonment from parents and a creeping distrust of authority. Menzies, a legendary Hollywood designer, brings forth his considerable skills in making the most of an obviously tiny budget. Emotional unease is depicted through the very minimalist design of the film, making the most mundane settings laced with a dreamy, nightmarish quality. (The police station design is particularly effective in bringing across an otherworldly feel to what should be an oasis of comfort to the boy.)Special effects are generally effective and again, disturbingly minimal, especially tiny probes in the back of the Martian's victim's necks being the only physical sign of impending takeover, or a series of increasingly creepy sandpit disappearances made all the more formidable by the accompanying haunting celestial choral compositions of Raoul Kraushaar. The anniversary edition DVD contains a few extras, the most significant being an alternate "British" version of the film, which is essentially the same film with a different final scene slapped on. Visual reproduction is a bit grainy but nothing that can't be altered with slight control adjustments.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 20, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    You should read the excellent article on dvdtalk dot com slash d

    You should read the excellent article on dvdtalk dot com slash dvdsavant slash s96InvadersA dot html, which argues why this movie is worth showing in the Louvre. All the negatives given here by other so-called reviewers actually are not valid. The only mistake in the DVDtalk article is to credit DESTINATION MOON as the first serious American Sci Fi film; the more-serious ROCKETSHIP X-M made it to theaters earlier than DM. I agree that the remake sucks. Kids I show this one to all seem to love it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews