×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Lion In Winter
     

Lion In Winter

4.7 21
Director: Anthony Harvey, Peter O'Toole, Katharine Hepburn, Jane Merrow

Cast: Anthony Harvey, Peter O'Toole, Katharine Hepburn, Jane Merrow

 

See All Formats & Editions

Full of plots and schemes, this wordy costume drama, an Oscar winner from 1968, come to DVD with some fine results. While not without its faults, the 2.35:1 transfer, enhanced for 16 x 9 televisions, is surprising strong on all accounts. Specks of grain and occasional scratches don't interrupt this top-quality presentation, one that highlights the limited use of

Overview

Full of plots and schemes, this wordy costume drama, an Oscar winner from 1968, come to DVD with some fine results. While not without its faults, the 2.35:1 transfer, enhanced for 16 x 9 televisions, is surprising strong on all accounts. Specks of grain and occasional scratches don't interrupt this top-quality presentation, one that highlights the limited use of colors while, at the same time, gives equal balance between dark and earthy tones which comprise the majority of the surroundings. The muddy feel of the 12th century is captured almost flawlessly. The two-channel mono soundtrack in Dolby Digital isn't going to impress anyone, nor was it meant to. At times a certain amount of echo is present, and auditory detail isn't its strong point, but for the most part, there are few complaints as dialogue is clear enough. Considering this is a dialogue-driven film, that is sufficient. While not necessarily going out of its way, MGM has supplied a couple of supplements. The exceedingly dated theatrical trailer is included, but far more noteworthy is an audio commentary recorded in 2000 by director Anthony Harvey. In a typically reserved British manner, Harvey discusses a number of points about his involvement in the production, but, unfortunately, the track is marred by significant gaps. Still, his memories of more than 30 years earlier have relevance.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
Barbed tongues wound to the quick in this James Goldman screenplay about England's King Henry II (1133-1189) and his dysfunctional family. Peter O'Toole dominates the film with his forceful portrayal of the legendary Henry. As ruler of a vast Anglo-Norman kingdom, the 50-year-old monarch holds sway over all that he sees except his wife and three sons. At Christmas, the family gathers in Chinon, France, as Henry considers who will inherit the crown. He favors John (Nigel Terry). His estranged wife and queen, Eleanor of Aquitaine (Katharine Hepburn), favors Richard (Anthony Hopkins). His third son, Geoffrey (John Castle), bitter that no one has championed his cause, schemes for the leavings of power. And then Henry fires the first salvo of the verbal war: "What should we hang, the holly or each other?" O'Toole gives one of his finest performances, spitting volleys of sarcasm and mockery at his wife and sons. Hepburn as the queen, returns insult for insult while also acknowledging that embers of love for Henry, whose mistress abides nearby, continue to burn. Meanwhile, the sons plot against Henry and each other. Hopkins, as Richard, gets the prize for delivering the best verbal low blow when he calls crybaby John a "walking pustule." Metaphors of better and more elegant quality season the dialogue throughout the film, allowing the actors to wring brilliance from their tongues. Credit writer Goldman, who adapted the script from his own play, for this achievement. During the film, the choral music of John Barry sets an appropriately ominous mood. And director Anthony Harvey occasionally mixes in action sequences, featuring poised lances and gleaming daggers, to pick up the pace. The costumes, the gloomy castle, and the clip-clop of snorting steeds, all accent the period ambience, but in the end it is the wonderful acting -- in particular O'Toole's and Hepburn's -- that carries the day and makes The Lion in Winter a masterpiece worth viewing again and again. Mike Cummings
All Movie Guide - Mike Cummings
Barbed tongues wound to the quick in this James Goldman screenplay about England's King Henry II (1133-1189) and his dysfunctional family. Peter O'Toole dominates the film with his forceful portrayal of the legendary Henry. As ruler of a vast Anglo-Norman kingdom, the 50-year-old monarch holds sway over all that he sees -- except his wife and three sons. At Christmas, the family gathers in Chinon, France, as Henry considers who will inherit the crown. He favors John (Nigel Terry). His estranged wife and queen, Eleanor of Aquitaine (Katharine Hepburn), favors Richard (Anthony Hopkins). His third son, Geoffrey (John Castle), bitter that no one has championed his cause, schemes for the leavings of power. And then Henry fires the first salvo of the verbal war: "What should we hang -- the holly or each other?" O'Toole gives one of his finest performances, spitting volleys of sarcasm and mockery at his wife and sons. Hepburn as the queen, returns insult for insult while also acknowledging that embers of love for Henry -- whose mistress abides nearby -- continue to burn. Meanwhile, the sons plot against Henry and each other. Hopkins, as Richard, gets the prize for delivering the best verbal low blow when he calls crybaby John a "walking pustule." Metaphors of better and more elegant quality season the dialogue throughout the film, allowing the actors to wring brilliance from their tongues. Credit writer Goldman, who adapted the script from his own play, for this achievement. During the film, the choral music of John Barry sets an appropriately ominous mood. And director Anthony Harvey occasionally mixes in action sequences, featuring poised lances and gleaming daggers, to pick up the pace. The costumes, the gloomy castle, and the clip-clop of snorting steeds, all accent the period ambience, but in the end it is the wonderful acting -- in particular O'Toole's and Hepburn's -- that carries the day and makes The Lion in Winter a masterpiece worth viewing again and again.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/19/2001
UPC:
0027616858979
Original Release:
1968
Rating:
PG
Source:
Mgm (Video & Dvd)
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital, monaural]
Time:
2:15:00
Sales rank:
3,610

Special Features

Audio commentary by director Anthony Harvey; Original theatrical trailer; French and Spanish subtitles

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Peter O'Toole Henry II
Katharine Hepburn Eleanor Of Aquitaine
Jane Merrow Princess Alais
John Castle Prince Geoffrey
Timothy Dalton Philip II of France
Anthony Hopkins Prince Richard (Richard the Lionhearted)
Nigel Terry Prince John
Nigel Stock William Marshall
O.Z. Whitehead Bishop of Durham
Kenneth Griffith Strolling Player
Henry Woolf Strolling Player

Technical Credits
Anthony Harvey Director
John Barry Score Composer,Musical Direction/Supervision
John Bloom Editor
Margaret Furse Costumes/Costume Designer
James Goldman Screenwriter
Kip Gowans Asst. Director
Simon Kaye Sound/Sound Designer
Joseph E. Levine Executive Producer
Bill Lodge Makeup
Gilbert Margerie Art Director
Peter Murton Art Director
Peter James Set Decoration/Design
Martin Poll Producer
Douglas Slocombe Cinematographer

Scene Index

Side #1 --
0. Scene Selection
1. Logo/Main Title [2:56]
2. Unlike King Lear [:07]
3. Christmas Reunion [3:17]
4. 3 Kings, One Kingdom [4:12]
5. The "Boy" Of France [1:14]
6. Richard Gets All [6:22]
7. Geoffrey's Plan [2:55]
8. A Deal For Eleanor [5:06]
9. The Sudden Wedding [5:31]
10. "We Are The Killers!" [3:08]
11. King Philip's Bedroom [7:28]
12. "Ive Lost My Boys" [1:25]
13. Henry's Future Son [2:37]
14. Never Let Them Out [5:32]
15. The Family Dungeon [1:44]
16. 'Till Easter/Credits [6:56]

Videos

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Lion In Winter 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I recently watched the Hallmark remake of 'Lion in Winter' starring Patrick Stewart and Glen Close, and although they perform admirably, I found myself longing for the pace and passion of O'Toole and Hepburn. Try as it may, the Hallmark version appears pale and bloodless when compared to the original.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I first saw this movie completely by accident, flipping through channels. All of a sudden, Katharine Hepburn is standing in a boat and Peter O'Toole helps her get down. She smiles sweetly and says "How kind of you to let me out of jail." He responds "It's only for the holidays." With that exchange alone the movies had me hooked. Hepburn and O'Toole manage to trap the audience in this conflict, skillfully blending hatred and love, both feelings thrown about passionately. You know these two figures are larger than life, yet both actors give them human dimensions that move beyond the typical excesses of those in power. Anthony Hopkins is fantastic as Richard, brilliantly displaying his interpretation of another character that has captured the imagination of the world for almost a thousand years. It's a legendary film with legendary characters played by legendary actors.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One needs to watch this film many times to glean the richness of acting, music, dialogue, scenery and other factors contributing to a excellent film. All the actors are at their very best.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I saw this film as an extra credit assignment in English and I fell in love with it. It has fast witty dialouge, many surprising twists and truns in the plot and was beautifully acted. I went out and bought it right after watching it. EVERYONE should see this film. Hepburn won an Oscar for this role.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a big Hepburn fan, this has to be my favorite of all-time film...she is riveting and spectacular, and O'Toole is fabulous as well...and the sets really look like 12th century England may have looked...highly recommend to everybody
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you love history and Katherine Hepburn as I do then this is the movie to buy. This is Hepburn at her best and Peter O'tool gives a stellar performance as well. 11th century English monarchy at its best and worst. Hepburn is witty, funny, and a tragic character as a deposed Queen of England. Young Timothy Dalton (007 fame)is handsome and treacherous as the King of France. You will enjoy this movie. It is truly one of the all-time classics. A definite must have in any movie buff collection.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A casual 1:00 AM flip of the remote introduced me the other night to The Lion in Winter. I have to say- it blew me away. The dialogue in this movie is unlike any I've ever heard. It absolutely crackles, and Hepburn's delivery makes one realize just what we've lost in the late, great Kate. Just watch it. If you don't mind a lot of talk, it can't fail to dazzle you.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lion in Winter is a brillant film with something for everyone. Full of witty humor and historical insight.
dragonzwisard More than 1 year ago
A riveting movie which is based on a historical event. Peter O'toole & Katherine Hepburn are superb as England's King Henry II & his equally royal wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine. Their surrounding cast is outstanding; the script is literate, witty & alive in its use of the English language. The dialogue positively crackles as Henry & Eleaanor trade insults, curses & wistful remembrances. "Lion in Winter" is a film for the ages and one that should be in everyone's cinematic library.
dragonsscape More than 1 year ago
"HA! What shall we hang ~~ the holly, or each other?" A riveting movie that is based on a historical event. Peter O'toole & Katherine Hepburn are superb as England's King Henry II & his equally royal wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine. Their surrounding cast is outstanding; the script is literate, witty & alive in its use of the English language. The dialogue positively crackles as Henry & Eleaanor trade insults, curses & wistful remembrances. "Lion in Winter" is a film for the ages and one that should be in everyone's cinematic library.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is truly my favorite movie.. The verbal volley between Kate and Peter is some of the best.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago