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No Direction Home - Bob Dylan
     

No Direction Home - Bob Dylan

3.8 5
Director: Martin Scorsese, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Mavis Staples

Cast: Martin Scorsese, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Mavis Staples

 

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Renowned director Martin Scorsese's documentary No Direction Home: Bob Dylan chronicles the career of the singer and songwriter during the tumultuous years between 1961 and 1966. Dylan allowed Scorsese to have access to hours of footage that had never before been made public, including a number of live performances, and footage of Dylan in the recording studio

Overview

Renowned director Martin Scorsese's documentary No Direction Home: Bob Dylan chronicles the career of the singer and songwriter during the tumultuous years between 1961 and 1966. Dylan allowed Scorsese to have access to hours of footage that had never before been made public, including a number of live performances, and footage of Dylan in the recording studio creating some of his landmark albums from the period. Dylan sits for an extensive interview, as does a variety of people who worked with him during this time period, including Joan Baez and fellow songwriter Pete Seeger. The film debuted on PBS stations around the country on September 26, 2005.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble
When our foremost modern film director turns his sights on the great modern singer-songwriter, a definitive documentary is assured. Martin Scorsese's No Direction Home follows the early career of Bob Dylan, from his days as a fledgling folk singer to his burst of popularity as the socially conscious "voice of his generation" to his controversial turn to electric rock music in the mid-1960s. Weaving onscreen commentary from such important Dylan collaborators as Joan Baez and Pete Seeger, as well as Dylan's own observations, the film paints a vivid picture of a volatile period in American life and Dylan's powerful artistic reaction to it. Including priceless interview and press-conference footage and dramatic performances from the time -- including the divisive Newport Folk Festival show of 1965, and the 1966 British tour with members of the Band -- this monumental documentary makes clear how and why Dylan became the living legend he remains to this day.
All Movie Guide - Perry Seibert
Much like in The Last Temptation of Christ, Martin Scorsese makes a figure of God-like power more relatable -- without diminishing an ounce of his mysterious power -- in the remarkable achievement that is No Direction Home: Bob Dylan. Martin Scorsese manages to make the inscrutable performer very human by making clear how quickly Dylan can adapt to whatever surrounds him, as well as absorb whatever strikes his fancy. By showing so many of the folk artists that influenced the young Dylan, it becomes easier to understand the persona he developed in his early career. Where the film surpasses earlier works on Dylan (most specifically the still fascinating Don't Look Back) is in the way Scorsese details the various forces both internal and external that led to Dylan embracing the change in his sound that alienated many in his audience. There are edits that make connections even longtime Dylanphiles may not have considered. Scorsese's sure hand becomes even more apparent in the second half, which opens with a dizzying sequence that makes the viewer feel the claustrophobia and pressure Dylan was experiencing at the time. The film works as history thanks to the wealth of remarkable footage Scorsese was granted access to, but the most fascinating aspect is that the film feels as psychologically penetrating as any film could be about an artist who seems to pride himself on his successful ability to stay unknowable. Dylan is still inscrutable at the end of the film, but in some way he has been made less mythic and more human thanks to Scorsese's skill.
Chicago Sun-Times - Roger Ebert

Scorsese's No Direction Home: Bob Dylan creates a portrait that is deep, sympathetic, perceptive and yet finally leaves Dylan shrouded in mystery, which is where he properly lives.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/28/2016
UPC:
0602557072259
Original Release:
2005
Source:
Capitol
Region Code:
0
Time:
3:27:00
Sales rank:
4,220

Special Features

Unedited "Apothecary Scene" from the 1966 U.K. tour; Interview with director Martin Scorsese on the making of the film; Extended interviews from Liam Clancy and Dave Van Ronk; Original trailer for the DVD release; Unused promotional spot for "Positively 4th St."; "I Can't Leave Her Behind" - work in progress in hotel room Glasgow, May 19, 1966

Cast & Crew

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- No Direction Home: Bob Dylan
1. Chapter 1 [1:04]
2. Chapter 2 [1:48]
3. Chapter 3 [10:25]
4. Chapter 4 [2:39]
5. Chapter 5 [3:06]
6. Chapter 6 [8:10]
7. Chapter 7 [6:31]
8. Chapter 8 [9:10]
9. Chapter 9 [:49]
10. Chapter 10 [8:10]
11. Chapter 11 [6:19]
12. Chapter 12 [11:40]
13. Chapter 13 [4:50]
14. Chapter 14 [5:02]
15. Chapter 15 [1:54]
16. Chapter 16 [2:45]
17. Chapter 17 [:40]
18. Chapter 18 [9:12]
19. Chapter 19 [3:35]
20. Chapter 20 [:48]
21. Chapter 21 [3:56]
22. Chapter 22 [1:30]
23. Chapter 23 [3:16]
24. Chapter 24 [1:48]
25. Chapter 25 [1:52]
26. Chapter 26 [1:56]
Disc #2 -- No Direction Home: Bob Dylan
1. Chapter 1 [2:06]
2. Chapter 2 [3:19]
3. Chapter 3 [2:41]
4. Chapter 4 [2:40]
5. Chapter 5 [3:47]
6. Chapter 6 [1:52]
7. Chapter 7 [2:52]
8. Chapter 8 [2:09]
9. Chapter 9 [2:21]
10. Chapter 10 [5:48]
11. Chapter 11 [6:37]
12. Chapter 12 [5:15]
13. Chapter 13 [7:12]
14. Chapter 14 [1:00]
15. Chapter 15 [4:13]
16. Chapter 16 [3:33]
17. Chapter 17 [4:01]
18. Chapter 18 [3:43]
19. Chapter 19 [4:41]
20. Chapter 20 [2:59]
21. Chapter 21 [:59]
22. Chapter 22 [5:48]
23. Chapter 23 [1:21]
24. Chapter 24 [3:15]
25. Chapter 25 [2:06]
26. Chapter 26 [1:39]
27. Chapter 27 [6:47]

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No Direction Home - Bob Dylan 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was as much about the time period in which Bob Dylan developed his particular style as well as the song writer / singer. Scorsese has directed another great one which was particularly appreciated by this fan.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Calypso4811 More than 1 year ago
OMG... Dylan narrates Dylan. I figured it would be like the A&E Biography story of him, in which several of his friends, acquaintances, hanger's on, would do running commentary. NO. In this movie, DYLAN, the man himself, tells his own feelings, ideas, thoughts over the years. He is approx 64-years-old at the time of this movie, and he looks amazing. The years are definitely being good to Bob Dylan.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago