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Kennel Murder Case
     

The Kennel Murder Case

3.0 1
Director: Michael Curtiz

Cast: William Powell, Mary Astor, Eugene Pallette

 

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Often (and accurately) described as a model of the whodunit genre, The Kennel Murder Case stars William Powell, making his fourth screen appearance as S. S. Van Dine's dilettante detective Philo Vance. This time the story involves intrigue at the Long Island kennel club. The murder victim is Robert H. Barrat, who works overtime

Overview

Often (and accurately) described as a model of the whodunit genre, The Kennel Murder Case stars William Powell, making his fourth screen appearance as S. S. Van Dine's dilettante detective Philo Vance. This time the story involves intrigue at the Long Island kennel club. The murder victim is Robert H. Barrat, who works overtime making himself a much-hated target in the first ten minutes. With the aid of a Doberman, Vance solves not only Barrat's murder but a follow-up killing designed to deflect attention from the killer. The suspects include Mary Astor, Ralph Morgan, Jack LaRue, Helen Vinson, Paul Cavanaugh and Arthur Hohl, all of whom have "done it" from time to time in other murder mysteries (movie buffs, however, will have little trouble spotting the killer; the person in question has probably been the hidden murderer in more films than any other member of the Screen Actor's Guild). Kennel Murder Case was William Powell's last "Philo Vance" film; it would be remade in 1940 as Calling Philo Vance, with James Stephenson as Vance and a new World War II angle added to the plot.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Richard Gilliam
The Kennel Murder Case was the fifth film in the Philo Vance series, but it's easily the best of the bunch, and it proved influential in encouraging the production of other intricate, challenging mystery films. Directed with crispness and efficiency by the reliable Michael Curtiz, the film is a good example of the high production standards of Warner Bros. in its post-silent era. The script is a solid whodunit packed with interesting characters, well-performed and impeccably cast. Much of the verbosity of S. S. Van Dine's novel is missing from Kennel Murder Case, making for a briskly told story.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/01/2016
UPC:
0889290390554
Original Release:
1933
Rating:
NR
Source:
Film Detective
Time:
1:13:00
Sales rank:
55,074

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
William Powell Philo Vance
Mary Astor Hilda Lake
Eugene Pallette Sgt. Ernest Heath
Ralph Morgan Raymond Wrede
Helen Vinson Doris Delafield
Etienne Girardot Dr. Doremus
Jack LaRue Eduardo Grassi
Paul Cavanagh Sir Thomas MacDonald
Robert H. Barrat Archer Coe
Henry O'Neill Dubois
Robert McWade District Attorney John F.X. Markham
Frank Conroy Brisbane Coe
Spencer Charters Snitkin
Charles Wilson Hennessey
Jimmy Lee Liang, the Cook
Harry Allen Sandy, the Dog Trainer
Wade Boteler Sergeant
Don Brodie Photographer
James Burke Cop
George Chandler Reporter
Milt Kibbee Charlie Adler, Reporter
Monte Vandergrift Detective
Leo White Desk Clerk
Arthur Hohl Gamble, the Butler

Technical Credits
Michael Curtiz Director
Leo F. Forbstein Musical Direction/Supervision
Orry Kelly Costumes/Costume Designer
Robert N. Lee Screenwriter
Ed N. McLarmin Editor
Harold McLernon Editor
Peter Milne Screenwriter
Jack Okey Art Director
Orry-Kelly Costumes/Costume Designer
Robert R. Presnell Producer,Screenwriter
William Rees Cinematographer

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The Kennel Murder Case 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Being a mystery fan, I always like to see as many classic mystery films as I can. I came across this one, a while ago. Until now, I didn't realize that William Powell had made 3 previous Philo Vance movies. If you love mysteries, this "locked-room" whodunnit is great. Plenty of clues and red herrings galore. It's a typical period piece, complete with many mystery cliche characters, including the prim and proper butler, the asian servant, the shady business partner, et al.. It gets a little confusing at times, but I enjoyed William Powell. His take on Vance is definately different, a bit more serious if you will, than his later stint as Nick Charles. But the mystery is the fun part, so if you like classic puzzlers, give this one a shot, I'm sure you'll enjoy it!