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Wool Cap
     

The Wool Cap

5.0 2
Director: Steven Schachter

Cast: William H. Macy, Keke Palmer, Don Rickles

 
Created for the TNT television network, The Wool Cap is a remake of the 1962 film Gigot, which was written by and starred the legendary Jackie Gleason. This time around, it's Academy Award-nominee and Emmy winner William H. Macy (Fargo) handling the lead role, as well as teleplay and producer duties. Macy stars as Gigot, a curmudgeonly mute who

Overview

Created for the TNT television network, The Wool Cap is a remake of the 1962 film Gigot, which was written by and starred the legendary Jackie Gleason. This time around, it's Academy Award-nominee and Emmy winner William H. Macy (Fargo) handling the lead role, as well as teleplay and producer duties. Macy stars as Gigot, a curmudgeonly mute who works as the super at a worn-down apartment building. After living a lonely existence for most of his years, Gigot finds his life turned upside-down when he unwittingly finds himself in the care of a precocious young girl named Lou (Keke Palmer). Also starring Ned Beatty and Catherine O'Hara, The Wool Cap netted a 2005 Golden Globe nod for Macy.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/14/2005
UPC:
0097368799646
Original Release:
2004
Rating:
PG-13
Source:
Paramount
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Time:
1:31:00
Sales rank:
70,914

Special Features

[None specified]

Related Subjects

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
William H. Macy Gigot
Keke Palmer Lou
Don Rickles Ira
Ned Beatty Mr. Gigot
Catherine O'Hara Gloria
Cherise Boothe Arleen

Technical Credits
Steven Schachter Director,Producer,Screenwriter
Jeff Beal Score Composer
Elaine Frontain Bryant Executive Producer
Paul Dixon Editor
Guy Dufaux Cinematographer
Jackie Gleason Original Story
Guy Lalande Production Designer
Irene Litinsky Producer
William H. Macy Producer,Screenwriter
Pat McCorkle Casting
Frances Croke Page Executive Producer
David Rosemont Executive Producer

Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Chapter 1 [15:09]
2. Chapter 2 [14:16]
3. Chapter 3 [16:26]
4. Chapter 4 [17:45]
5. Chapter 5 [13:02]
6. Chapter 6 [14:41]

Customer Reviews

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The Wool Cap 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The wool cap is a feel good movie that will reach down into your soul and soften the hardest heart. William H. Macy does a stunning and moving portrayal of his character that will leave you with a flurry of emotions! You WILL enjoy this film that should be seen by the entire family.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Take a Hallmark production and slate it for broadcast during the Christmas season, and most times you have a guaranteed recipe for schmaltz. Fortunately, in the case of The Wool Cap, now available on DVD, the result is an honest, human movie whose gritty edge and powerful performances keep it fresh, even if it is predictable. A remake of Jackie Gleason’s classic, Gigot, the story unfolds along initially familiar lines. Hard luck, crusty, frequently intoxicated janitor “Chico,” played here by William H. Macy, finds himself the unwilling and decidedly unofficial guardian of a captivating, if troublesome, young girl named Lou. But from the beginning Macy the screenwriter does Macy the actor an enormous favor by tossing out the Frank Capra conventions and setting Chico and Lou in the unvarnished (but equally unexaggerated) ghetto. In the opening twenty minutes of this film, at the same time we are getting to know the main characters, we are also getting a feeling for their hardscrabble world of losers, drug addicts, violence, fear and general hopelessness. If the perky, young hooker upstairs seems too pat and too Hollywood, Macy’s screenplay shrewdly balances her with the shopworn, older hooker who reserves Wednesdays for Chico alone…apparently one of only two human relationships Fate and Chico himself have allowed him to maintain. Where earlier efforts along these lines would have had Lou’s parents die in a “terrible accident,” or in an anonymous and random act of war, Macy’s screenplay firmly roots the story in the case files of today, by having Lou abandoned by a drug befogged mother who later dies of an OD. Making the situation all the more grim, Chico is a mute, rendered speechless by a car accident almost thirty years ago. Chico’s other two central relationships are with Ira, his Jewish tenant, played with gusto and undisguised relish by Don Rickles (who else could pull off using the word schmutz?), and “Grace,” his pet spider monkey, who, needless to say, just about steals any scene she is in. But what truly makes this film an amazing feat is Macy’s performance. Without uttering a single syllable, Macy understatedly takes us through the full range of human emotions as Chico resents life, resents Lou, resents her mother, and throughout, resents himself, before finding a meaning and purpose and a dogged determination to rescue the future from the damning grips of the past. It is, without a doubt, a stellar performance. In addition to Don Rickles, Cathrine O’Hara appears in far too few scenes as Chico’s pay-as-you-go love interest, a role she nails with dead on accuracy and Ned Beatty appears briefly but powerfully as Chico’s embittered father. This isn’t great theater or maybe it is. It is touching, without being cloying. It is sweet without being saccharin, and it is reaffirming, without being schmaltzy. It is quite simply a dammed good film.