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Extreme Programming Pocket Guide

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Overview

Extreme Programming (XP) is a radical new approach to software development that has been accepted quickly because its core practices—the need for constant testing, programming in pairs, inviting customer input, and the communal ownership of code—resonate with developers everywhere. Although many developers feel that XP is rooted in commonsense, its vastly different approach can bring challenges, frustrations, and constant demands on your patience.Unless you've got unlimited time (and who does these days?), you ...

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Extreme Programming Pocket Guide

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Overview

Extreme Programming (XP) is a radical new approach to software development that has been accepted quickly because its core practices—the need for constant testing, programming in pairs, inviting customer input, and the communal ownership of code—resonate with developers everywhere. Although many developers feel that XP is rooted in commonsense, its vastly different approach can bring challenges, frustrations, and constant demands on your patience.Unless you've got unlimited time (and who does these days?), you can't always stop to thumb through hundreds of pages to find the piece of information you need. The Extreme Programming Pocket Guide is the answer. Concise and easy to use, this handy pocket guide to XP is a must-have quick reference for anyone implementing a test-driven development environment.The Extreme Programming Pocket Guide covers XP assumptions, principles, events, artifacts, roles, and resources, and more. It concisely explains the relationships between the XP practices. If you want to adopt XP in stages, the Extreme Programming Pocket Guide will help you choose what to apply and when. You'll be surprised at how much practical information is crammed into this slim volume.O'Reilly's Pocket Guides have become a favorite among developers everywhere. By providing a wealth of important details in a concise, well-organized format, these handy books deliver just what you need to complete the task at hand. When you've reached a sticking point in your work and need to get to a solution quickly, the new Extreme Programming Pocket Guide is the book you'll want to have beside your keyboard.

Concise and easy to use, this handy pocket guide to XP is a must-have quick reference for anyone implementing a test-driven development environment.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Extreme Programming requires folks to work together more closely than ever before: developers, managers, coaches, trackers, customers. While immensely valuable, the XP methodology isn’t always self-evident. People accustomed to other methodologies (or lack thereof) would really benefit from a quick, readable reference to XP: a book that can go wherever they are (for example, on site with the customer or at pair programming workstations). O’Reilly’s just delivered that book: Extreme Programming Pocket Guide.

In just over 100 pages, O’Reilly Network technical editor “Chromatic” offers quick, usable answers about every aspect of XP, for every project participant. Part I’s a quick overview for newcomers. Why bother with process? What are XP’s “values,” and why do they matter more than some generic corporate values statement? What does it mean to “assume sufficiency” -- to program as if you had enough time and resources?

Then, it’s on to the day-to-day nuts and bolts. Chromatic covers coding practices (simplicity, refactoring, standards, common vocabularies); developer practices (test-driven development, pair programming, continuous integration); and business practices (planning, regular releases, sustainable scheduling). There’s a chapter on XP iteration planning, plus handy coverage of XP’s minimal (but crucial) artifacts -- including story and task cards. New XP project participants will appreciate Chromatic’s simple explanations of their roles, as well as his quick guide to overcoming the obstacles that stand in the way of “going extreme.” Bill Camarda

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks for Dummies, Second Edition.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596004859
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 7/4/2003
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 108
  • Sales rank: 438,433
  • Product dimensions: 6.56 (w) x 6.94 (h) x 0.32 (d)

Meet the Author

chromatic manages Onyx Neon Press, an independent publisher. His areas of expertise include agile software development, language design, and virtual machines for dynamic languages. He is also a published novelist. His books include The Art of Agile Development and Masterminds of Programming.

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Table of Contents

Foreword;
Preface;
Overview of This Book;
Typographic Conventions;
Comments and Questions;
Acknowledgments;
Part I: Why XP?;
Chapter 1: Who Cares About Process, Anyway?;
Chapter 2: The XP Equation;
Chapter 3: XP Values;
3.1 Communication;
3.2 Feedback;
3.3 Simplicity;
3.4 Courage;
Chapter 4: Assuming Sufficiency;
4.1 Sufficient Time;
4.2 Sufficient Resources;
4.3 Constant Cost of Change;
4.4 Developer Effectiveness;
4.5 Freedom to Experiment;
Part II: Extreme Programming Practices;
Chapter 5: Coding Practices;
5.1 Coding Practice 1: Code and Design Simply;
5.2 Coding Practice 2: Refactor Mercilessly;
5.3 Coding Practice 3: Develop Coding Standards;
5.4 Coding Practice 4: Develop a Common Vocabulary;
Chapter 6: Developer Practices;
6.1 Developer Practice 1: Adopt Test-Driven Development;
6.2 Developer Practice 2: Practice Pair Programming;
6.3 Developer Practice 3: Adopt Collective Code Ownership;
6.4 Developer Practice 4: Integrate Continually;
Chapter 7: Business Practices;
7.1 Business Practice 1: Add a Customer to the Team;
7.2 Business Practice 2: Play the Planning Game;
7.3 Business Practice 3: Release Regularly;
7.4 Business Practice 4: Work at a Sustainable Pace;
Part III: XP Events;
Chapter 8: Iteration Planning;
8.1 Stories and Tasks;
8.2 Estimates and Schedules;
8.3 The First Iteration;
Chapter 9: The Iteration;
Chapter 10: Releasing;
Part IV: Extreme Programming Artifacts;
Chapter 11: Story Cards;
Chapter 12: Task Cards;
Chapter 13: The Bullpen;
Part V: Roles in Extreme Programming;
Chapter 14: The Customer;
14.1 Customer Rights;
14.2 Customer Responsibilities;
Chapter 15: The Developer;
15.1 Developer Rights;
15.2 Developer Responsibilities;
Chapter 16: Supplementary Roles;
16.1 The Tracker;
16.2 The Coach;
Part VI: Coding, XP Style;
Chapter 17: Do the Simplest Thing That Could Possibly Work;
Chapter 18: You Aren’t Gonna Need It;
Chapter 19: Once and Only Once;
Part VII: Adopting XP;
Chapter 20: Before You Start;
Chapter 21: Eliminating Fear and Working Together;
Chapter 22: Starting Feedback;
Chapter 23: Including Managers and Customers;
Chapter 24: Now That You’re Extreme;
Part VIII: Further Resources;
Chapter 25: XP Resources;

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 7 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2013

    TO EVERYONE

    VICTORY ROAD IS AT VICTORY ROAD

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2013

    Wells

    I think I will also join.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2013

    King

    I guess im gonna start too!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2013

    To all

    Saffron city is the last city

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2013

    Astro to lottie

    You forgot victory road.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2013

    Neko

    Nice job making this

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2003

    Very good concise guide...

    In today's world of tech books that are hundreds of pages long, it's nice to see a short, 'no fluff' guide to a subject that is actually usable. This book fills that bill nicely. Even if you've read about and implemented XP in your shop, there are times you need to review one of the points about how it all works together. Since the author covers all the main points of XP, you can quickly find the information you need. You also get a nice cross-reference at the end of each chapter that shows how each point relies on other parts of the methodology. I find this very useful if you are faced with having to modify XP for your use. It's recommended that you implement XP in its entirety, as it's meant to be more than the sum of its part. But if you have to tweak something, you know how it will affect the other areas. I would not recommend this book as your only resource if you were just starting to implement XP. You really need to read Extreme Programming Explained by Kent Beck. He's the founder of XP, and that book goes into much more detail as to the whys of the process. But this book is one that each member of the team should have to keep the concepts fresh. This is a very good book to use as a supplemental reference or reminder guide if you're using the XP methodology. If you were looking for a concise explanation of XP, this would also work for you. If you were looking for a more in-depth explanation of the methodology, I would recommend one of the books by Kent Beck.

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