Fresco / Edition 1

Fresco / Edition 1

3.8 15
by Sheri S. Tepper
     
 

ISBN-10: 038081658X

ISBN-13: 2900380816582

Pub. Date: 02/28/2002

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

One day, in the midst of strange events that are occurring throughout the United States, plain-spoken, 360year-old bookstore manager Benita Alvarez-Shipton is greeted by a pair of aliens who ask her to transmit their message of peace to Washington.

And so begins a fantastic adventure more perilous and important than Benita can imagine, because the envoys have come

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Overview

One day, in the midst of strange events that are occurring throughout the United States, plain-spoken, 360year-old bookstore manager Benita Alvarez-Shipton is greeted by a pair of aliens who ask her to transmit their message of peace to Washington.

And so begins a fantastic adventure more perilous and important than Benita can imagine, because the envoys have come with a dire warning about another extraterrestrial race: predators with their attention focused on Earth, who may have already made their first "visit".

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900380816582
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/28/2002
Pages:
480

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Fresco 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This story, served up as a profound and touching adventure tale, is also an indulgent fantasy of justice - justice hilariously delivered with all the innocent effeciency and practicality you'd expect from, say, a perfect house-wife.
Guest More than 1 year ago
At thirty-six years old, Benita Alvarez-Shipton finds herself trapped in an abusive relationship with her drunk of a spouse. In spite of her hard work ethic, Benita seems reasonably low on the human food chain. Yet for some unknown reason beyond earthly understanding, the intergalactic traveling Pistach ambassadors Chiddy and Vess choose Benita as their emissary.

Chiddy and Vess give the earthwoman a cube containing a message of peace, an opportunity to join the galactic federation, and finally the ability to end crime, poverty, famine, and slavery. The male oligopoly running our country scorns the cube and its female holder. In spite of their contempt, the cube finally weaves its way through the bureaucracy to reach the president. He names Benita as his point of contact with the aliens. However, just as the Pistach have discovered the needle in the haystack affectionately called Earth, other races much more hostile see the planet as a large hunting reserve.

THE FRESCO is a different type of science fiction novel that succeeds as a wonderful tale in support of women's rights. The story line satirically skews obstinate men in a very amusing way while highlighting the dreams of women seeking peace, freedom, and prosperity for all. The weird Python-like humor ironically offers intriguing twists to headline news is not for everyone (ask Jerry Falwell who makes a cameo appearance). Though clearly Sheri S. Tepper's novel targets a select group of women, men will enjoy this wild morality ride or face the Pistach impregnating them via a wasp.

Harriet Klausner

Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This author manages to portray just how "bizarre" an alien race would most probably percieve many of humankinds customs and beliefs. She actually does it in such a manner that the READER starts to question the absurdity of them. Excellent read!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've read several of her books and loved them. But this one was too simplistic, suitable for young, idealistic readers. Her hatred of men comes through too obviously. The aliens fix the things she personally (I think) that she sees wrong with the world.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This wasn't a bad book, but I think Tepper used it to bash readers over the head with her political views. Aliens come to Earth to announce that Earth must now join a Confederation. If they refuse, they will be hunted by other, less benevolent aliens. But are these aliens really benevolent? They begin a massive reconfiguation campaign on Earth's people, starting with erasing Jerusalem till people stop fighting over it, making one country's women ugly till their men treat them better, and the like. They even forcibly impregnate US politicians who have come out saying they are firmly pro-life, so they know what it feels like, more or less. It's a bit sad when such a talented author has to force her case this way, and it's a bit artificial-feeling for humankind to improve only after this level of forcing. Is this really something to be regarded as positive? I personally resist that idea. It scares me that any race might disregard personal freedom and personal choices that much -- is it fair of me, a pro-choice woman, to deny a pro-lifer his or her opinions? I think not. Tepper makes beautifully well-realized characters, and here is no exception. Her alien races are rich and credible, well worth the reading time. There's a lot here that is diverting. Upshot: take this as a fantasy, a fairy tale. It's fun to read, in that adolescent way one might imagine one's enemies getting their just desserts through fair means or foul, but it certainly isn't up to the par of Tepper's other works.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read many of Sheri S. Teper's books, including 'Beauty', 'Jinian Footseer', and 'King's Blood Four,' and liked most of them. However, 'The Fresco' is one of the worst books I have ever read. In 'The Fresco', benevolent aliens come to Earth offering to solve all of its problems, if only Earth will enter into their Confederation. The aliens are less like technologically advanced visitors and are more like gods. They release a plague on Afghanistan to teach the men there a lesson about how they treat women. They spirit Jerusalem away to teach people in the Middle East to be peaceful. They give police drug-sensing devices which are 100% infallible so all drug dealers are caught, with no need for pesky warrants. Meanwhile, other alien species teach pro-life men a lesson by impregnating them with alien larvae, while loggers and anit-environmentalist types are eaten by predator aliens. The book brings to mind Christianity's Final Judgment, when a higher power comes to earth to punish the guilty and set everything right. Except, in 'The Fresco', the higher power are aliens and 'right' means agreeing with a certain set of political beliefs. The politics in the book are sort of strange -- definitely pro-choice and environmentalist, which makes you think liberal, but at the same time some very conservative viewpoints are espoused. The homeless are basically lazy and should be encouraged to kill themselves with drugs and alcohol to keep them out of the gene pool. Due process and probable cause are annoying and only serve to keep criminals out of jail. The ACLU is evil. People who agree with these statements (and in the book, that's everyone who isn't blatantly evil or stupid) are heroes, while those who disagree are punished or reprogrammed. Basically, this is a scary book. I am a liberal and a feminist, but I don't want people who disagree with me eaten or impregnated with alien larvae. Beyond that, I don't want some all-powerful aliens coming to earth, releasing plagues and vanishing cities to teach humans a lesson. This book advocates a big-brother scenario that should disturb anyone, regardless of their political beliefs.