The Galveston That Was

The Galveston That Was

5.0 2
by Howard Barnstone
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions


“Of all the books about Galveston, one of the best continues to be architect Howard Barnstone’s The Galveston That Was, published many years ago. This poignant and vivid record of the great mansions and public buildings of the historic island city by the late Houston architect is credited as being a catalyst in the preservation and restoration movement…  See more details below

Overview


“Of all the books about Galveston, one of the best continues to be architect Howard Barnstone’s The Galveston That Was, published many years ago. This poignant and vivid record of the great mansions and public buildings of the historic island city by the late Houston architect is credited as being a catalyst in the preservation and restoration movement in Galveston.”—Houston Chronicle “This beautiful picture book about nineteenth-century Galveston architecture is also a book about how Galveston’s historic buildings were saved.”—Historic Preservation “The compelling power of The Galveston That Was comes from both Barnstone’s text and the photographs by Cartier-Bresson and Stoller. . . . The Galveston That Was probes the present on the same level as the past. It disquiets and unsettles us, asking us to establish ourselves, wherever we are, by building what we care about and caring about what we build.”—Bloomsbury Review

Read More

Editorial Reviews

TopCountryMusic.com

“This coffee table sized book contains countless beautiful photos and the fascinating histories of the great buildings that made Galveston and Texas what they are today.”--TopCountryMusic.com
Houston Chronicle

“Of all the books about Galveston, one of the best continues to be architect Howard Barnstone’s The Galveston That Was, published 28 years ago. This poignant and vivid record of the great mansions and public buildings of the historic island city by the late Houston architect is credited as being a catalyst in the preservation and restoration movement in Galveston.”--Houston Chronicle
Historic Preservation

“This beautiful picture book about nineteenth-century Galveston architecture is also a book about how Galveston’s historic buildings were saved.”--Historic Preservation
Bloomsbury Review

“The compelling power of The Galveston That Was comes from both Barnstone’s text and the photographs by Cartier-Bresson and Stoller. . . . The Galveston That Was probes the present on the same level as the past. It disquiets and unsettles us, asking us to establish ourselves, wherever we are, by building what we care about and caring about what we build.”--Bloomsbury Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781623492472
Publisher:
Texas A&M University Press
Publication date:
12/14/2014
Series:
Sara and John Lindsey Series in the Arts and Humanities, #5
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
248
Sales rank:
961,956
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

HOWARD BARNSTONE was a visiting critic at Yale University’s School of Architecture and a professor in the College of Architecture at the University of Houston. HENRI CARTIER-BRESSON is considered one of the major artists of the twentieth century, having covered many of the world’s biggest events, from the Spanish Civil War to the French uprisings in 1968. His photography has been featured in major exhibits around the world. EZRA STOLLER was a distinguished architectural photographer whose work is included in museum collections around the world.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
She endures soaring ups and crashing downs she is sometimes called 'Oleander City ' she was the third largest port in the nation in the late 1800s - she is Galveston, undaunted and enjoying a renaissance that began in the 1970s. 'The Galveston That Was,' containing numerous updates and corrections, is a republication of the 1966 edition. With photographs by Henri Cartier-Bresson and Ezra Stoller, this handsome volume not only pays visual tribute to the architectural glories of Galveston, but also captures its indomitable spirit. In the mansions and public buildings built during the city's heyday is found an astounding display of Victorian architecture. The Heidenheimer Castle boasts a tower and wall construction of poured cement and oyster shell. An attached porch may have been built as a 'ruin' because 'The Victorians adored buildings in a half-ruined state they called it `pleasing decay.'' The Customs House, a study in Greek Revival, is awash in cast-iron balustrades, window frames, columns, cornices and dentils. Undoubtedly, it was once one of the city's most significant buildings. These and countless more examples of mid 19th century architecture are presented from various angles in stunning photographs. The text is a valuable lesson in Texas history as well as a fascinating story of the lives of many who had an impact on the Queen City. - Gail Cooke
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this as a gift for a daughter whose interests include photography and historic preservation. I haven't seen more than the cover because the copy in the store is sealed in plastic. Her husband says she hasn't put it down all day.