Good Night, Monkey Boy

Good Night, Monkey Boy

4.2 4
by Jarrett J. Krosoczka
     
 

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Who's that eating a banana? Swinging from the shower curtain? Making faces in the mirror? Why, it looks like a monkey!

But not to Mommy. Mommy knows it's her own monkey boy, and even monkey boys need their sleep. But first, they need to clean up their room and take a bath. Then she'll read a story. "Good night, Monkey Boy . . . and no more bananas!" See more details below

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Overview

Who's that eating a banana? Swinging from the shower curtain? Making faces in the mirror? Why, it looks like a monkey!

But not to Mommy. Mommy knows it's her own monkey boy, and even monkey boys need their sleep. But first, they need to clean up their room and take a bath. Then she'll read a story. "Good night, Monkey Boy . . . and no more bananas!"

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Those who face the nightly challenge of getting a hyperactive pre-schooler to bed will find this story familiar. The boy here is affectionately called Monkey Boy in a large-type text that consists primarily of a series of adult requests—"Let's get ready for bed, Monkey Boy;" "Enough of that!" The double-page spreads barely contain the antics and energy of the joyous, monkey-suited redhead, while the vigorous, almost crude illustrations are painterly in their construction and emotion-arousing in their design. Clearly this mischievous fellow is meant to get under your skin, and he does! 2001, Alfred A. Knopf/Random House, $16.99 and $14.95. Ages 3 to 6. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-It's bedtime, and a reluctant Monkey Boy tries to stall. He sneaks into the kitchen for a last banana, uses his toothbrush on his head instead of his teeth, and swings from the shower rod. While the concept is similar to that in David Shannon's No, David! (Scholastic, 1998), the execution here falls flat. Monkey Boy has none of David's exuberance or deliciously naughty mischief. At times, he doesn't even seem to enjoy his own antics. His facial expression in many of the illustrations is both glum and anxious. The action is belabored, with double-page spreads devoted to "Now let's brush your teeth" or "Bath time, Monkey Boy." The cartoon illustrations themselves have a muddy look and rely heavily on brown, gray, and dark green. There are plenty of stories available about lovable miscreants, and Russell Hoban's Bedtime for Frances (HarperCollins, 1960) remains a classic about delaying bedtime.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
You'll know the type, and here he is especially winning: a little boy who knows all the tricks to prolong the act of going to bed. Decked out in his monkey pj's, the boy sidles off into the kitchen to grab a banana as soon as the call goes up for bedtime. "Sorry, no bananas before bedtime, Monkey Boy," says his mother-the single sentence splashed across the page in big type that has the effect of whitewash-as she ushers him to the bathroom for some tooth-brushing. Monkey Boy is about to apply the toothpaste to his fiery mop of red hair when his mother intervenes and points him toward the bath, where he proceeds to turn the shower curtain bar into a piece of gymnastic equipment. Artful perspectives place mom as a presence, large and looming, even if it's only her hand, but the child is always the center of each spread, in fact mom's head and face are never seen. Finally, it's into bed and ready for a story . . . hey, where'd that banana come from? " ‘Good night, Monkey Boy. I love you, too, Monkey Boy.' " And sure as the sun is going to rise, once mom is gone, out comes the flashlight and the half-eaten banana. Despite the up-tempo delivery, Krosoczka'a story can be read as a bedtime tale-if not exactly a lullaby-for the voluptuous colors and the quilt-deep qualities of the full-bleed, double-paged spreads work like a hearty meal on the wakefulness of young readers. (Picture book. 2-5)
From the Publisher
“Especially winning.”—Kirkus Reviews

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780440417989
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
08/26/2003
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
573,027
Product dimensions:
10.11(w) x 10.80(h) x 0.15(d)
Age Range:
2 - 5 Years

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