Growing Up with Epilepsy: A Practical Guide for Parents

Growing Up with Epilepsy: A Practical Guide for Parents

by Lynn Bennett Blackburn
     
 

This book provides the tools you need to raise a child with epilepsy, to support his/her social development, provide effective discipline, and negotiate the educational system.

Each stage in your child's life presents unique issues and problems, ranging from finding day care to school programming to driving. This book is organized so that you can go to the

Overview

This book provides the tools you need to raise a child with epilepsy, to support his/her social development, provide effective discipline, and negotiate the educational system.

Each stage in your child's life presents unique issues and problems, ranging from finding day care to school programming to driving. This book is organized so that you can go to the information that you need when you need it, returning for updates as your child grows and new issues emerge.

In her 20 years of working with children with epilepsy, Dr. Blackburn has been continually impressed by the fact that no two children with epilepsy are the same. Each child and each family has unique needs. Because of this, she works with a team. The unique talents of each team member let the group meet the unique needs of each patient. This book will help you build the resource team for your child. In addition to providing you with basic tools, the book identifies resources, places you can contact, additional materials you can read, and the kinds of professionals that may be in your community to help you and your child.

Every parent is busy, and parents of children with epilepsy may be evenbusier than most. This book has been organized with the busy parent in mind. The first four chapters are a "must read" for every parent. Theyprovide the basic tools for understanding epilepsy, behavior management and school programming. The final chapter summarizes parenting of a child with epilepsy, providing an easy to remember checklist.

Issues for parenting a toddler with epilepsy are far different than issuesfor parenting an adolescent. You can go to the information that you need,when you need it, returning to the book for an update as your child grows and new issues emerge. You can select the section that is important to you in understanding your child, reading the other chapters when you have time and/or want to know more about the brain in general.

Childhood epilepsy may provide speed-bumps in the road to adulthood, but it does not have to be a barricade. For 20 years, Dr. Blackburn has helped parents negotiate the speed bumps, creating an owner's manual for their child. Now, she helps you make this journey."

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Andrea Starrett, MD (Ochsner Clinic Foundation)
Description: This is a manual for parents of children with epilepsy or chronic seizure disorders. It was written by a neuropsychologist with extensive experience in evaluating children with epilepsy as well as in parenting and educational interventions for children.
Purpose: The book is intended to provide parents tools to discipline their child, support social development, and negotiate the educational system as an effective advocate for the child. Although relatively brief (160 pages), the book provides a wealth of practical information.
Audience: The book was written for parents in easy, comprehensible language. The author does not shirk from using medical terms but always provides a clear and simple explanation for complicated medical or neuropsychological terminology. As a neuropsychologist with 20 years of experience in the pediatric epilepsy center at Children's Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the author is a very credible and compassionate authority.
Features: The initial four chapters of the book discuss general issues in child management and the unique problems epilepsy poses for the child and family's adjustment. Each chapter is organized in a question/answer format, so the reader can easily skim through a chapter to answer a specific question. However when read straight through, the chapters provide a good general discussion of the issues. The chapters cover a general review of the neurological dysfunction of epilepsy, disruption that seizures cause to family routines, disciplinary problems and disciplinary approaches for children with seizures, and academic/educational problems that children with epilepsy encounter. The middle section is an excellent review of the cognitive dysfunctions seen in focal epilepsy syndromes involving the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. The final sections of the book cover the specific problems that epilepsy causes in various age groups. Each chapter closes with a recommended reading list from familiar parenting books, manuals, and pamphlets from the Epilepsy Society. Although the chapters are set up in narrative format, important issues such as designing behavior management programs, disciplinary approaches for various age children, and reviews of the various educational laws are covered in brief, clear tables. The only shortcoming of the book is its lack of discussion of medication in a systematic manner. Although medication problems are mentioned in several chapters, there is no single chapter or listing of commonly used epilepsy medications and their side effects. The author did offer some practical suggestions for getting children to take unsavory medications.
Assessment: This book would be a great help to parents of children with epilepsy. The concise format and easy readability should make it an excellent addition to the literature on special parenting needs.
Reviewer: Andrea Starrett, MD(Ochsner Clinic Foundation)
Description: This is a manual for parents of children with epilepsy or chronic seizure disorders. It was written by a neuropsychologist with extensive experience in evaluating children with epilepsy as well as in parenting and educational interventions for children.
Purpose: The book is intended to provide parents tools to discipline their child, support social development, and negotiate the educational system as an effective advocate for the child. Although relatively brief (160 pages), the book provides a wealth of practical information.
Audience: The book was written for parents in easy, comprehensible language. The author does not shirk from using medical terms but always provides a clear and simple explanation for complicated medical or neuropsychological terminology. As a neuropsychologist with 20 years of experience in the pediatric epilepsy center at Children's Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the author is a very credible and compassionate authority.
Features: The initial four chapters of the book discuss general issues in child management and the unique problems epilepsy poses for the child and family's adjustment. Each chapter is organized in a question/answer format, so the reader can easily skim through a chapter to answer a specific question. However when read straight through, the chapters provide a good general discussion of the issues. The chapters cover a general review of the neurological dysfunction of epilepsy, disruption that seizures cause to family routines, disciplinary problems and disciplinary approaches for children with seizures, and academic/educational problems that children with epilepsy encounter. The middle section is an excellent review of the cognitive dysfunctions seen in focal epilepsy syndromes involving the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. The final sections of the book cover the specific problems that epilepsy causes in various age groups. Each chapter closes with a recommended reading list from familiar parenting books, manuals, and pamphlets from the Epilepsy Society. Although the chapters are set up in narrative format, important issues such as designing behavior management programs, disciplinary approaches for various age children, and reviews of the various educational laws are covered in brief, clear tables. The only shortcoming of the book is its lack of discussion of medication in a systematic manner. Although medication problems are mentioned in several chapters, there is no single chapter or listing of commonly used epilepsy medications and their side effects. The author did offer some practical suggestions for getting children to take unsavory medications.
Assessment: This book would be a great help to parents of children with epilepsy. The concise format and easy readability should make it an excellent addition to the literature on special parenting needs.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781888799743
Publisher:
Springer Publishing Company
Publication date:
06/01/2003
Pages:
161
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author

Lynn Bennett Blackburn, Ph.D. is a pediatric neuropsychologist at St. Louis Children's Hospital. She works with the families and children receiving care through the Pediatric Epilepsy Center, a joint program of Children's Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, as well as serving on the Professional Advisory Board of the Epilepsy Foundation of the St. Louis Region. She has approached the task of creating a practical guide for parents from the perspective of the questions raised by the families she serves and her experience as a parent to her own children.

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