Java and Soap

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Overview

Java and SOAP provides Java developers with an in-depth look at SOAP (the Simple Object Access Protocol). Of course, it covers the basics: what SOAP is, why it's soared to a spot on the Buzzwords' Top Ten list, and what its features and capabilities are. And it shows you how to work with some of the more common Java APIs in the SOAP world: Apache SOAP and GLUE.In addition to covering the basics such as the structure of a SOAP message, SOAP encoding, and building simple services using RPC and messaging, Java and ...

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Overview

Java and SOAP provides Java developers with an in-depth look at SOAP (the Simple Object Access Protocol). Of course, it covers the basics: what SOAP is, why it's soared to a spot on the Buzzwords' Top Ten list, and what its features and capabilities are. And it shows you how to work with some of the more common Java APIs in the SOAP world: Apache SOAP and GLUE.In addition to covering the basics such as the structure of a SOAP message, SOAP encoding, and building simple services using RPC and messaging, Java and SOAP covers many topics that are essential to real-world development. Although SOAP has native support for an impressive number of object types, the nature of modern programming means that whatever SOAP gives you is not enough. When do you need to add support for your own object types, and how do you do it? How do you handle errors, and how do you add your own information to Fault messages? How do you handle attachments? In an ideal world, you could live entirely within Java, and ignore the SOAP messages being send back and forth: you'd be able to write Java code and let the SOAP APIs work behind the scenes. However, we're not yet in that ideal world, and won't be for some time. Therefore, Java and SOAP pays particular attention to how SOAP messages are encoded. It doesn't just explain the document types, but shows how the documents are used in practice as they are generated by the different APIs. If you ever have to debug interoperability problems, you'll find that this information is indispensable.We've always found that the best software is written by people who understand what's happening under the hood. SOAP is no different. Let's say you need to write a custom serializer to create a SOAP representation of a structure. How do you know that your encoding is efficient? There's one definitive answer: look at the SOAP documents it produces!Java and SOAP also discusses interoperability between the major SOAP platforms, including Microsoft's .NET, SOAP messaging, SOAP attachments, message routing, and a preview of the forthcoming AXIS APIs and server. If you're a Java developer who would like to start working with SOAP, this is the book you need to get going.

This guide introduces Java developers to the Simple Object Access Protocol for designing and implementing Web services. It surveys the existing technology and protocols the SOAP leverages and why they are important.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Java’s resources for building SOAP-based web services are unfamiliar to many developers, and even those who are familiar with them are challenged by how rapidly they’re evolving. Java and SOAP is designed for both groups of developers.

Over time, SOAP development will become increasingly transparent: You’ll write your Java code, and the SOAP APIs will do all the heavy lifting. But until nirvana arrives, you do need to concern yourself with encoding and interoperability issues (think .NET). So you’ll really appreciate the “under the hood” information this book gives you -- not just about encoding, but also about custom object types and serialization, handling errors and attachments, and many other crucial topics.

Author Rob Englander also does an admirable job of preparing you for changes yet to come. For instance, while its examples are based on Apache SOAP 2.0 (and the widely used “GLUE” alternative), Englander also previews Axis, a forthcoming “from-scratch rewrite” that will make Apache SOAP more modular and flexible while offering far better performance. There’s also a full chapter on Sun’s brand-new Java API for XML-based RPC (JAX-RPC).

If you want to build Java-based web services now, and build better ones tomorrow, read this book. (Bill Camarda)

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks For Dummies®, Second Edition.

From The Critics
In addition to covering fundamentals of the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP), such as the structure of a SOAP message, SOAP encoding, and building simple services using RPC and messaging, this book for Java developers also covers topics essential to real-world development, and shows how to work with some of the more common Java APIs, such as Apache SOAP and GLUE. It discusses interoperability between major SOAP platforms, and provides previews of the forthcoming Axis APIs, JAX-RPC, and JAXM. Englander is president of a consulting service in software architecture, design, and development. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596001759
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/28/2002
  • Edition description: 1ST
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 278
  • Sales rank: 1,196,819
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 9.22 (h) x 0.71 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert Englander is Principal Engineer and President of MindStream Software, Inc. (www.mindstrm.com). He provides consulting services in software architecture, design, and development, as well as developing frameworks for use on client projects. His focus is in the areas of component architectures and distributed systems. Rob has built software in Java and C++ for clients ranging from small shops to large organizations. He has spoken at industry conferences, written articles for magazines and journals, and is the author of the OReilly book Developing Java Beans.

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Table of Contents

Dedication

Preface

Chapter 1: Introduction

Chapter 2: The SOAP Message

Chapter 3: SOAP Data Encoding

Chapter 4: RPC-Style Services

Chapter 5: Working with Complex Data Types

Chapter 6: Custom Serialization

Chapter 7: Faults and Exceptions

Chapter 8: Alternative Techniques

Chapter 9: SOAP Interoperability and WSDL

Chapter 10: SOAP Headers

Chapter 11: JAX-RPC and JAXM

Colophon

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2002

    Earned a place in my reference shelf

    SOAP or Simple Object Access Protocol is the latest specification in the world of distributed computing. This is a relatively lightweight protocol, based on XML and fast becoming one of the standards in the exchange of information in a distributed computing environment.One of the greatest selling points of SOAP is its effective decoupling from implementation and underlying transport. In other words, you can have SOAP implementations in Java or others. The book does justice to the title by working with the Apache SOAP and GLUE implementation based on Java. The book is organized in a simple, clear and easy to read style. The first few chapters provide an overview of SOAP, elements, encoding before moving on to RPC, Serialization, Complex data types, Fault handling and WSDL. It covers SOAP messaging, SOAP attachments, message routing and previews the JAX-RPC and JAXM API's. There is an entire chapter discussing interoperability between the major SOAP platforms Apache SOAP, GLUE and Microsoft's .NET along with code samples. The book could have done better by providing more examples of JAX-RPC and JAXM API's. The book also does not provide a conceptual framework to show various components of a web service solution and how the component technologies fit together. Overall a very good book and handy reference for development with Java & Soap. Web services developer's, you would need more than just this book on your reference shelf.

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