Java: The Good Parts [NOOK Book]

Overview

What if you could condense Java down to its very best features and build better applications with that simpler version? In this book, veteran Sun Labs engineer Jim Waldo reveals which parts of Java are most useful, and why those features make Java among the best programming languages available.

Every language eventually builds up crud, Java included. The core language has become increasingly large and complex, and the libraries associated with...

See more details below
Java: The Good Parts

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$13.49
BN.com price
(Save 43%)$23.99 List Price

Overview

What if you could condense Java down to its very best features and build better applications with that simpler version? In this book, veteran Sun Labs engineer Jim Waldo reveals which parts of Java are most useful, and why those features make Java among the best programming languages available.

Every language eventually builds up crud, Java included. The core language has become increasingly large and complex, and the libraries associated with it have grown even more. Learn how to take advantage of Java's best features by working with an example application throughout the book. You may not like some of the features Jim Waldo considers good, but they'll actually help you write better code.

  • Learn how the type system and packages help you build large-scale software
  • Use exceptions to make code more reliable and easier to maintain
  • Manage memory automatically with garbage collection
  • Discover how the JVM provides portability, security, and nearly bug-free code
  • Use Javadoc to embed documentation within the code
  • Take advantage of reusable data structures in the collections library
  • Use Java RMI to move code and data in a distributed network
  • Learn how Java concurrency constructs let you exploit multicore processors

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781449390709
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 4/20/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 196
  • Sales rank: 714,065
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Jim Waldo is a Distinguished Engineer with Sun Microsystems Laboratories, where he investigates next-generation large-scale distributed systems. He is currently the technical lead of Project Darkstar, a multi-threaded, distributed infrastructure for massive multi-player on-line games and virtual worlds. Prior to his current assignment with Sun Labs, he was the lead architect for Jini, a distributed programming system based on Java.

Before joining Sun, Jim spent eight years at Apollo Computer and Hewlett Packard working in the areas of distributed object systems, user interfaces, class libraries, text and internationalization. While at HP, he led the design and development of the first Object Request Broker, and was instrumental in getting that technology incorporated into the first OMG CORBA specification.

Jim is a Professor of the Practice at Harvard University, where he teaches distributed computing and topics in the intersection of policy and technology in the department of computer science.

Jim received his Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Massachusetts (Amherst). He also holds M.A. degrees in both linguistics and philosophy from the University of Utah. He is a member of the IEEE and ACM.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface; Java and Me; You, the Audience; Conventions Used in This Book; Using Code Examples; How to Contact Us; Safari® Books Online; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1: An Introduction to Java; 1.1 What Is Java Good For?; Chapter 2: The Type System; 2.1 The Basics; 2.2 Why Have Three?; 2.3 Inside and Out; 2.4 Beware; 2.5 A Real Problem; Chapter 3: Exceptions; 3.1 The Basics; 3.2 The Why; 3.3 Use and Abuse; 3.4 The Dark Side; Chapter 4: Packages; 4.1 The Basics; 4.2 Packages and Access Control; 4.3 An Example; 4.4 Packages and the Filesystem; Chapter 5: Garbage Collection; 5.1 The Basics; 5.2 Garbage Collection and References; 5.3 Other Resources; Chapter 6: The Java Virtual Machine; 6.1 The Basics; 6.2 Security; 6.3 Portability; Chapter 7: Javadoc; 7.1 The Basics; 7.2 An Example; 7.3 Style Guides, Editors, and Nonterminating Discussions; Chapter 8: Collections; 8.1 The Basics; 8.2 Parameterized Types; 8.3 Advanced Topics; 8.4 Random Access; 8.5 Some Last Thoughts; Chapter 9: Remote Method Invocation and Object Serialization; 9.1 The Basics; 9.2 Object Serialization; 9.3 Subtypes in RPC Systems; Chapter 10: Concurrency; 10.1 The Basics; 10.2 Synchronizing; 10.3 Atomic Data; Chapter 11: The Developer Ecology; 11.1 IDEs; 11.2 JUnit; 11.3 FindBugs; 11.4 Other Tools; Colophon;

Jim Waldo is a Distinguished Engineer with Sun Microsystems Laboratories, where he investigates next-generation large-scale distributed systems. He is currently the technical lead of Project Darkstar, a multi-threaded, distributed infrastructure for massive multi-player on-line games and virtual worlds. Prior to his current assignment with Sun Labs, he was the lead architect for Jini, a distributed programming system based on Java.

Before joining Sun, Jim spent eight years at Apollo Computer and Hewlett Packard working in the areas of distributed object systems, user interfaces, class libraries, text and internationalization. While at HP, he led the design and development of the first Object Request Broker, and was instrumental in getting that technology incorporated into the first OMG CORBA specification.

Jim is a Professor of the Practice at Harvard University, where he teaches distributed computing and topics in the intersection of policy and technology in the department of computer science.

Jim received his Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Massachusetts (Amherst). He also holds M.A. degrees in both linguistics and philosophy from the University of Utah. He is a member of the IEEE and ACM.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 6, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great for study of computer language

    I am very pleased with this work, not only as an explanation of important parts of the Java language, but as a commentary of important features of a programming language in general. Good for language developers. Java (The Good Parts) is not intended to teach Java, though it does a great job of doing that anyway through its in-depth analysis and explanation of key aspects of the language. I highly recommend it to an experienced programmer who wants to go an extra step into theory and practical use. If you're a beginner, it's best to skip this book and start with the many other teach-yourself-Java books available.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)