Mastering Unix Shell Scripting: BASH, KORN Shell, and KORN 93 Shell Scripting for Programmers, System Administrators and UNIX Gurus

( 3 )

Overview

UNIX expert Randal K. Michael guides you through every detail of writing shell scripts to automate specific tasks. Each chapter begins with a typical, everyday UNIX challenge, then shows you how to take basic syntax and turn it into a shell scripting solution. Covering Bash, Bourne, and Korn shell scripting, this updated edition provides complete shell scripts plus detailed descriptions of each part. UNIX programmers and system administrators can tailor these to build tools that monitor for specific system events...

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Overview

UNIX expert Randal K. Michael guides you through every detail of writing shell scripts to automate specific tasks. Each chapter begins with a typical, everyday UNIX challenge, then shows you how to take basic syntax and turn it into a shell scripting solution. Covering Bash, Bourne, and Korn shell scripting, this updated edition provides complete shell scripts plus detailed descriptions of each part. UNIX programmers and system administrators can tailor these to build tools that monitor for specific system events and situations, building solid UNIX shell scripting skills to solve real-world system administration problems.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470183014
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 4/28/2008
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 1032
  • Sales rank: 663,443
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 2.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Randal K. Michael is a UNIX Systems Administrator working as a contract consultant. He teaches UNIX shell scripting in corporate settings, where he writes shell scripts to address a variety of problems and tasks ranging from monitoring systems to replicating large databases. He has more than 30 years of experience in the industry and 15 years of experience as a UNIX Systems Administrator, working on AIX, HP-UX, Linux, OpenBSD, and Solaris.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments.

Introduction.

Part One: The Basics of Shell Scripting.

Chapter 1: Scripting Quick Start and Review.

Chapter 2: 24 Ways to Process a File Line-by-Line.

Chapter 3: Automated Event Notification.

Chapter 4: Progress Indicators Using a Series of Dots, a Rotating Line, or Elapsed Time.

Part Two: Scripts for Programmers, Testers, and Analysts.

Chapter 5: Working with Record Files.

Chapter 6: Automated FTP Stuff.

Chapter 7: Using rsync to Efficiently Replicate Data.

Chapter 8: Automating Interactive Programs with Expect and Autoexpect.

Chapter 9: Finding Large Files and Files of a Specific Type.

Chapter 10: Process Monitoring and Enabling Pre-Processing, Startup, and Post-Processing Events.

Chapter 11: Pseudo-Random Number and Data Generation.

Chapter 12: Creating Pseudo-Random Passwords.

Chapter 13: Floating-Point Math and the bc Utility.

Chapter 14: Number Base Conversions.

Chapter 15: hgrep: Highlighted grep Script.

Chapter 16: Monitoring Processes and Applications.

Part Three: Scripts for Systems Administrators.

Chapter 17: Filesystem Monitoring.

Chapter 18: Monitoring Paging and Swap Space.

Chapter 19: Monitoring System Load.

Chapter 20: Monitoring for Stale Disk Partitions (AIX-Specific).

Chapter 21: Turning On/Off SSA Identification Lights.

Chapter 22: Automated Hosts Pinging with Notification of Failure.

Chapter 23: Creating a System-Configuration Snapshot.

Chapter 24: Compiling, Installing, Configuring, and Using sudo.

Chapter 25: Print-Queue Hell: Keeping the Printers Printing.

Chapter 26: Those Pesky Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Audits.

Chapter 27: Using Dirvish with rsync to Create Snapshot-Type Backups.

Chapter 28: Monitoring and Auditing User Keystrokes.

Appendix A: What’s on the Web Site.

Index.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2008

    Expert knowledge of Shell Scripting

    I would suggest this book for any System Administrators with desire to learn shell scripting. If you would like to learn more shell scripting this is the perfect book!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2008

    wide span of topics

    [A review of the 2ND EDITION, where the latter was published in June 2008.] Perhaps you are a programmer or sysadmin of a heterogeneous network of unix and linux machines. Where the unixes hail from different vendors. Think Solaris, HP-UX, AIX and the Macintosh. (Yes, the Mac runs a descendent of Mach, which is a dialect of unix.) And maybe the linux boxes have different distros. This book spans the gamut of most unixes (I include linux in this). Helping you easily write shell scripts, without taking sides over which unix or linux version is better. The second ecumenical aspect is that it also avoids favouring any of the 3 major unix shells - Borne, Korn and bash. In some newsgroups, there has been a tedious and interminable debate about the relative virtues of these shells. While one shell might indeed be better than others for a given task, in general they have equivalent functionality. The book's evenhanded approach is one worth emulating. Thoughtfully, the book suggests topics that might be typically useful to sysadmins, and others more suited to programmers. It is not a strict divide. But for sysadmins, you can see discussions about how to monitor disk partitions, or system load and swap space usage. These are often issues germane to your duties. The bulk of the book is more on programmer-related topics. Much. Note that the book is largely random access, unlike a science textbook for example, which is serial access from the front. In other words, with just a minimal acquaintance with basic scripting, you can dive straight into any chapter, without reading its predecessor.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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