The Monster's Corner: Stories Through Inhuman Eyes

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Overview

An all original anthology from some of todays hottest supernatural writers, featuring stories of monsters from the monster's point of view.  In most stories we get the perspective of the hero, the ordinary, the everyman, but we are all the hero of our own tale, and so it must be true for legions of monsters, from Lucifer to Mordred, from child-thieving fairies to Frankenstein's monster and the Wicked Witch of the West.  From our point of view, they may very well be horrible, terrifying ...

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Overview

An all original anthology from some of todays hottest supernatural writers, featuring stories of monsters from the monster's point of view.  In most stories we get the perspective of the hero, the ordinary, the everyman, but we are all the hero of our own tale, and so it must be true for legions of monsters, from Lucifer to Mordred, from child-thieving fairies to Frankenstein's monster and the Wicked Witch of the West.  From our point of view, they may very well be horrible, terrifying monstrosities, but of course they won’t see themselves in the same light, and their point of view is what concerns us in these tales.  Demons and goblins, dark gods and aliens, creatures of myth and legend, lurkers in darkness and beasts in human clothing…these are the subjects of The Monster’s Corner.  With contributions by Lauren Groff, Chelsea Cain, Simon R. Green, Sharyn McCrumb, Kelley Armstrong, David Liss, Kevin J. Anderson, Jonathan Maberry, and many others.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Spotlighting monsters of all varieties (other than the explicitly proscribed zombies and vampires), Golden (The New Dead) assembles a solid variety of tales. The best is Gary Braunbeck’s gonzo, metafictional “And You Still Wonder Why Our First Impulse Is to Kill You.” Simultaneously hilarious and heartbreaking, it gradually transforms into elegant musing on the nature of monsters in fiction even as the prose becomes deliberately chaotic. Other highlights include Tom Piccirilli’s “The Cruel Thief of Rosy Infants,” an intriguing faerie changeling tale; Sarah Pinborough’s “The Screaming Room,” a nice twist on the gorgon myth; Jeff Strand’s “Specimen 313,” an effectively funny tale of love and plant monsters; and Tananarive Due’s “The Lake” and David Liss’s “The Awkward Age,” both of which explore the nature of sexual predators. The few stories that miss the mark are well outnumbered, and readers will appreciate the diverse monsters, including radioactive giants and an Indian Rakshasi. (Oct.)
From the Publisher
"Spotlighting monsters of all varieties ... Golden ... assembles a solid variety of tales."—Publishers Weekly "Contributions from Sharyn McCrumb, Tananarive Due, Heather Graham, and others make this a strong themed anthology."—Library Journal
Library Journal
From Kevin J. Anderson's poignant chronicle of Frankenstein's monster brought forward to Germany in 1938 ("Torn Stitches, Shattered Glass") to Simon R. Green's reenvisioning of Christ's temptation by Satan ("Jesus and Satan Go Jogging in the Desert"), the 19 stories in this collection, edited by horror writer and editor Golden, are told from the point of view of the monsters rather than the heroes. A rakshasa seeks freedom after 200 years of servitude in Kelly Armstrong's "Rakshasi," while the tragedy of a monstrously large man, victim of an experiment gone wrong, plays out to its inevitable conclusion in David Moody's "Big Man." VERDICT Contributions from Sharyn McCrumb, Tananarive Due, Heather Graham, and others make this a strong themed anthology that should have general appeal.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312646134
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 9/27/2011
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 719,428
  • Product dimensions: 6.22 (w) x 9.22 (h) x 1.07 (d)

Meet the Author

Christopher Golden is the award-winning author of many bestselling books including Waking Nightmares, Of Saints and Shadows, Of Masques and Martyrs, and The Myth Hunters. He has also written books for teens and young adults, including Soulless and Poison Ink, and he is the editor of The New Dead: A Zombie Anthology, published by St. Martin’s Press. His novels have been published in fourteen languages. Golden was born and raised in Massachusetts, where he continues to live with his family.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 7 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 26, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great compilation

    The Monster's Corner is an entertaining collection of nineteen tales in which monsters (in our eyes) tell their respective story as heroes in their eyes (or whatever orbs they have). All the entries are quite good adhering to the Frankenstein legend that asks who the monster is. David Moody's "Big Man" is a well written nod to Mary Shelly's classic while Kevin J. Anderson updates the Frankenstein's to 1938 Germany in 1938 in "Torn Stitches, Shattered Glass". Gary Braunbeck's "And You Still Wonder Why Our First Impulse Is to Kill You" looks deeply and amusingly at what makes up a monster as the other side has nightmares about humans hunting and stalking them. Two centuries of slavery has a "Rakshasi" (by Kelly Armstrong) seeking freedom. Finally Simon R. Green takes a close look at Satan's attempts to recruit Christ in "Jesus and Satan Go Jogging in the Desert" while John Maberry stars Saint John in his entry that even monsters are God's creation. From sexual predators (see Tananarive Due's "The Lake" and David Liss' "The Awkward Age") to the gorgon Sarah Pinborough's "The Screaming Room) to a faerie changeling starring in "The Cruel Thief of Rosy Infants" (by Tom Piccirilli) to Kate Shugak in "Siren Song" by Dana Stabenow, the monsters want their time in court as they demand the media especially authors stop spinning lies about them.

    Harriet Klausner

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 20, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    This is story collection focused on the point of view of the mon

    This is story collection focused on the point of view of the monster. It does have one author I love but I might have made an exception because I loved the idea of monster point of view. I just wish it stayed focused on the paranatural or supernatural, an average collection of tales, but worth checking out if you’re looking for a change or break from series or single tales.
    1. The Awkward Age by David Liss. Had the feel like a Ghoul Lolita. A little disturbing and could have been more if the reason why she chose to be ghoul was looked at.
    2. Saint John by Jonathon Maberry. Human monster tale. At the end of days, a monster becomes a hero.
    3. Rue by Laura Goff. A re-envisioned Rapunzel.
    4. Succumb by John McLiveen. Lackluster succubus tale. Why not have teen succubus falls in love. Succubus’ first time. Could have been much more.
    5. Torn Stitches, Shattered Glass by Kevin J. Anderson. Frankenstein’s monster in WWII.
    6. Rattler and the Mothman by Sharyn McCrumb. One of my favorite tales. Enjoyable characters. In this tale Mothman has his say on things.
    7. Big Man by David Moody. Reminiscent of the science experiment tales, like The Fly or The Incredible Hulk, with a slight twist.
    8. Rakashi by Kelley Armstrong: One of my favorite writers. Live an evil life. Die and be transformed into a demon warrior. Have the chance for redemption, but can a monster truly change?
    9. Breeding the Demons by Nate Kenyon. A morbid, disturbing tale of art and creation, the monster within.
    10. Siren Song by Dana Stabenow. Didn’t like the end at the start. Made it harder to follow. Had some issues with this tale, about three sisters who kill a pimp, and become the “angels” of the community. All this trouble, to get away from a really bad family situation. For a girl that was so smart, there are other ways, to get out of this situation besides murder. Felt fake, and left one wondering if maybe they weren’t human, real Sirens.
    11. Less of a Girl by Chelsea Cain. Disturbing. Weird. Creepy. About the monster under the bed.
    12. The Cruel Thief of Rosy Infants by Tom Piccirilli. Interesting tale. A twist on the changeling story in Fairy Tales.
    13. The Screaming Room by Sarah Pinborough. One should not assume that all possible readers of the story know how Medusa came to be. Should have started from her point of view there and added the rest of the story. Not bad though.
    14. Wicked Be by Heather Graham. Loved the use of Salem and the Witch Trials in the tale. Loved the idea of a witch just wanting to have a normal life.
    15. Specimen 313 by Jeff Strand. A tale that gives voice to man eating mutant plants.
    16. The Lake by Tananarive Due. Liked the twist on the don’t go in the water tale. Thought at times the teacher was border pedophile.
    17. The Other One by Micheal Morghall Smith. Why was this story in the collection? One sort of human monster, in it. Confused ending. Time travel? Doppleganger? Shapeshifter?
    18. And Still You Wonder Why We Our First Impulse Is To Kill You: An Alphabetized Faux Manifesto Transcribed, Edited, Annotated,(under duress and protest) by Gary A. Braunbeck. Huh? Confusing. Tripping, weird.
    19. Jesus and Stan Go Jogging in the Desert by Simon R. Green. From Satan’s perspective of course. A bit strange at points but not a bad tale.
    Worth checking out if you want change or break from the normal serial or novel.

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  • Posted May 3, 2013

    Not as I expected. Not enough "strange stuff'"

    Only one or two stories were worth reading.

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    Posted June 19, 2012

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    Posted December 1, 2011

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    Posted December 10, 2011

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    Posted November 4, 2011

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