One of Our Thursdays Is Missing (Thursday Next Series #6)

One of Our Thursdays Is Missing (Thursday Next Series #6)

4.2 79
by Jasper Fforde
     
 

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The New York Times bestseller and the wildly inventive sixth installment of a series that has more than one million copies (and counting) in print.

Dazzlingly funny and imaginative, Jasper Fforde's books have won him the affection of readers, reviewers, and-dare we say it-booksellers alike. Fans can breathe a sigh of relief because Thursday Next-or at

Overview

The New York Times bestseller and the wildly inventive sixth installment of a series that has more than one million copies (and counting) in print.

Dazzlingly funny and imaginative, Jasper Fforde's books have won him the affection of readers, reviewers, and-dare we say it-booksellers alike. Fans can breathe a sigh of relief because Thursday Next-or at least one of her-is back. At a time of great unrest in the BookWorld, only the ace literary detective can avert a devastating Genre War-thing is, Thursday has vanished. Now the written Thursday must answer the call, save the Bookworld, evade capture, and find the actual Thursday! With a clockwork Butler in tow, and Men in Plaid as well as her Designated Love Interest in pursuit, she must reluctantly agree to journey up the mysterious Metaphoric River for answers. Thursday’s zany investigations continue with Jasper Fforde’s latest bestseller, The Woman Who Died A Lot. Visit jasperfforde.com for a ffull window into the Ffordian world!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for One of Our Thursdays is Missing

One of Our Thursdays is Missing, like other Fforde novels, is jam packed with spot-on parody, puns and wry observations about words and genres that will delight literary-minded fans of the series.” - Los Angeles Times

 

“There is no denying Fforde’s supersized imagination, linguistic agility and love of books, Books, BOOKS.” - Chicago Sun-Times

 

“Fforde’s diabolical meshing of insight and humor makes a ‘mimefield’ both frightening and funny, while the reader must traverse a volume that’s minefield of unexpected turns and amusing twists.” - Publishers Weekly

 

One of Our Thursdays is Missing is filled with passages [in] which geeky humor jostles with genuine insight about the current state of fiction.… [T]ake a joy ride with the passionate reader who wrote this novel.” - Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel

“[With a] furiously agile imagination…Fforde has shaken up genres—fantasy, comedy, crime, sci-fi, parody, literary criticism—and come up with a superb mishmash with lots of affectionate in-jokes for any book lover.” - Miami Herald

 

“Fforde is a breath of fresh air.” -Kirkus

“Fforde’s books are more than just an ingenious idea. They are written with buoyant zest and are tautly plotted. They have empathetic heroes and heroines who nearly make terrible mistakes and suitably dastardly villains who do. They also have more twists and turns than Christie, and are embellished with the rich details of Dickens or Pratchett.” -Independent

“A riot of puns, in-jokes and literary allusions that Fforde carries off with aplomb.” - Daily Mail

“Fans of the late Douglas Adams, or, even, Monty Python, will feel at home with Fforde.” Herald 

 Praise for The Woman Who Died A Lot, the next installment in the Thursday Next series

“Fforde continues to show that his forte is absurdist humor in his seventh crime thriller starring Thursday Next, a member of the Literary Detectives division of Special Operations in an alternate-universe Britain.  [An] endearingly-bizarre fantasy world limited only by Fforde’s impressive imagination.” –Publishers Weekly

“As always, Fforde makes this wacky world perfectly plausible, elucidating Ffordian physics with just the right ratio of pseudoscientific jargon to punch lines. It’s a dazzling, heady brew of high concept and low humor, absurd antics with a tea-and-toast sensibility that will appeal to fans of Douglas Adams and P. G. Wodehouse alike. Fforde is ffantastic!”

Booklist(starred review)

“Strap in and hang on tight.... Another winner for fans and lovers of sf, time travel, puns, allusions, and all sorts of literary hijinks.”

Library Journal (Starred review)

“Jasper Fforde fans, rejoice! The Woman Who Died a Lot, the seventh installment in his Thursday Next series, delivers all the imagination, complexity and laughs we've come to expect from Fforde and his book-hopping, butt-kicking heroine.The Woman Who Died a Lot brings together the charming lunacy and intricate plotting that have enthralled Fforde's readers over the years.” –Shelf Awareness

 

“In Misery, Stephen King compares the euphoric feeling writers experience in creative bursts to ‘falling into a hole filled with bright light.’ Avid readers also know that feeling: A good story temporarily erases the world. British novelist Jasper Fforde has expanded on King’s simile in a wonderful seven-book series of novels featuring Thursday Next. Enormously knowledgeable about literary history, Fforde scatters nuggets for nerdy readers like me. By the end, all of Fforde’s myriad particles of plot, accelerated by his immense skill and narrative sense, collide, producing pyrotechnics and a passel of new particles to propel his next tale. I love the Thursday Next books, and when a new one appears, I don’t fall but leap into this bibliophile’s Wonderland.” –The Cleveland Plain Dealer

“This is the proverbial madcap lighthearted romp, full of hijinks, parody, and puns. Jasper Fforde does it well. It’s safe to say that if you enjoy that particularly British, Douglas Adams-style absurd delivery of wry observations, you’ll get a kick out of this one.” New York Journal of Books

“The Welsh writer Jasper Fforde's wildly inventive books defy easy description — more accurately, they mercilessly mock the concept of easy description. Are they mysteries? Outrageous parodies of literary classics? Science fiction? Absurdist humor? Gleeful mashups of all the above?” [The Woman Who Died A Lot is] still big, big fun, with enough in-jokes to keep anyone snickering for a long time — especially English Lit geeks.” The Seattle Times

“Quirky and surprising and funny. Thursday fans will welcome her return.”

The Free Lance–Star

Los Angeles Times
“Jam-packed with spot-on parody, puns, and wry observations about words and genres that will delight literary-minded fans of the series.”
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
“Geeky humor jostles with genuine insight about the current state of fiction.... Take a joy ride with the passionate reader who wrote this novel."
Chicago Sun-Times
“There is no denying Fforde’s supersized imagination, linguistic agility, and love of books, Books, BOOKS.”
Independent
"Fforde's books are more than just an ingenious idea. They are written with buoyant zest and are tautly plotted. They have empathetic heroes and heroines who nearly make terrible mistakes and suitably dastardly villains who do. They also have more twists and turns than Christie, and are embellished with the rich details of Dickens or Pratchett."
Daily Mail
"A riot of puns, in-jokes and literary allusions that Fforde carries off with aplomb."
Herald
"Fans of the late Douglas Adams, or, even, Monty Python, will feel at home with Fforde."
Publishers Weekly
With the real Thursday Next missing, the "written" Thursday Next leaves her book to undertake an assignment for the Jurisfiction Accident Investigation Department, in Fforde's wild and wacky sixth BookWorld novel (after Thursday Next: First Among Sequels). As written Thursday Next finds herself playing roles intended for her real counterpart, BookWorld's elite try to deal with a border dispute between Racy Novel and Women's Fiction. It's not always possible to know where one is in BookWorld, which has been drastically remade, or in Fforde's book, which shares the madcap makeup of Alice in Wonderland, even borrowing Alice's dodo. Outrageous puns (e.g., a restaurant called Inn Uendo) and clever observations relating to the real book world (e.g., the inhabitants of "Vanity" island now prefer Self-Published or Collaborative) abound. Fforde's diabolical meshing of insight and humor makes a "mimefield" both frightening and funny, while the reader must traverse a volume that's a minefield of unexpected and amusing twists. 10-city author tour. (Mar.)
Library Journal
When we last saw intrepid Jurisfiction cop Thursday Next (in Thursday Next: First Among Sequels), she was, once again, kicking butt while saving both the real world and the world of literature. However, just as the BookWorld faces a major geopolitical crisis, Thursday has gone missing. Can her BookWorld equivalent, the written Thursday, find her in time to prevent war among genres? Written Thursday is less than confident as she struggles with snippy coworkers, a substitute who hits the hyphens hard and brings home goblins, relentless and homicidal Men in Plaid, and a foreboding trip up the Metaphoric River. But written Thursday does have a stellar butler, Sprockett, and her likeness to the real Thursday is very useful in the investigation, if confusing to those around her. More concerned with the inner workings of BookWorld than the alterna-England of the real Thursday, this entry gives a backstage view of the world of literature and just what happens to characters when their books aren't being read. VERDICT More metafiction fun from the best-selling Fforde—maybe not the easiest place to join the series, but a must-read for fans. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 11/15/10.]—Devon Thomas, DevIndexing, Chelsea, MI
Kirkus Reviews

Any intersection between Fforde's novels and a recognizably real world are almost entirely coincidental, for he's most at home in constructing insouciant (and elaborate) literary fantasies.

Thursday Next, the protagonist of many of the author's previous novels, is back...or rather, she's not, for she's the missing girl of the title. And although she vanishes, the written Thursday Next does not. The plot involves the search for the "real" Thursday Next, when she disappears a week before peace talks preceding the possible outbreak of a genre war, so the written Thursday Next sets out to find her. (Yes, it's all a bit confusing, and Fforde has great fun ringing changes on this confusion.) Written Thursday Next is on the case, exploring the various byways of BookWorld and eventually going up the mighty Metaphoric River, with its echoes of Conrad. Of course, in Fforde's fictive world almost everything has some kind of literary echo: Cabbies take the written Thursday to Norland Park (from Sense and Sensibility); she meets Jay Gatsby's less famous brother, the Loser Gatsby (younger sibling to the Mediocre Gatsby); she learns that Heathcliff is riding the same train she is (and notes "a lot of screaming and fainting girls on the platform whenever we stopped"); has drinks at the Bar Humbug; and comes across signs like "Do Not Feed the Ambiguity." Fforde, of course, finds all of this highly diverting and even includes sly references to The Eyre Affair, an earlier Thursday Next novel. To appreciate Fforde, it's both helpful and essential for a reader to have a substantial literary background. While some of the gags are sly and work well (for example, the confusion about whether a character named Red Herring is actually a red herring), others are rather forced and seem to exist solely for the sake of a punch line ("I think we've driven into a mimefield").

Your appreciation of Fforde will depend solely on your tolerance for self-conscious, and occasionally slick, literary cleverness.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780143120513
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/31/2012
Series:
Thursday Next Series , #6
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
253,066
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.70(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Praise for The Woman Who Died A Lot, the next installment in the Thursday Next series

“Fforde continues to show that his forte is absurdist humor in his seventh crime thriller starring Thursday Next, a member of the Literary Detectives division of Special Operations in an alternate-universe Britain. [An] endearingly-bizarre fantasy world limited only by Fforde’s impressive imagination.” –Publishers Weekly

“As always, Fforde makes this wacky world perfectly plausible, elucidating Ffordian physics with just the right ratio of pseudoscientific jargon to punch lines. It’s a dazzling, heady brew of high concept and low humor, absurd antics with a tea-and-toast sensibility that will appeal to fans of Douglas Adams and P. G. Wodehouse alike. Fforde is ffantastic!”
Booklist (starred review)

“Strap in and hang on tight.... Another winner for fans and lovers of sf, time travel, puns, allusions, and all sorts of literary hijinks.”
Library Journal (Starred review)

“Jasper Fforde fans, rejoice! The Woman Who Died a Lot, the seventh installment in his Thursday Next series, delivers all the imagination, complexity and laughs we've come to expect from Fforde and his book-hopping, butt-kicking heroine.The Woman Who Died a Lot brings together the charming lunacy and intricate plotting that have enthralled Fforde's readers over the years.” –Shelf Awareness


“In Misery, Stephen King compares the euphoric feeling writers experience in creative bursts to ‘falling into a hole filled with bright light.’ Avid readers also know that feeling: A good story temporarily erases the world. British novelist Jasper Fforde has expanded on King’s simile in a wonderful seven-book series of novels featuring Thursday Next. Enormously knowledgeable about literary history, Fforde scatters nuggets for nerdy readers like me. By the end, all of Fforde’s myriad particles of plot, accelerated by his immense skill and narrative sense, collide, producing pyrotechnics and a passel of new particles to propel his next tale. I love the Thursday Next books, and when a new one appears, I don’t fall but leap into this bibliophile’s Wonderland.” –The Cleveland Plain Dealer

“This is the proverbial madcap lighthearted romp, full of hijinks, parody, and puns. Jasper Fforde does it well. It’s safe to say that if you enjoy that particularly British, Douglas Adams-style absurd delivery of wry observations, you’ll get a kick out of this one.” New York Journal of Books
“The Welsh writer Jasper Fforde's wildly inventive books defy easy description — more accurately, they mercilessly mock the concept of easy description. Are they mysteries? Outrageous parodies of literary classics? Science fiction? Absurdist humor? Gleeful mashups of all the above?” [The Woman Who Died A Lot is] still big, big fun, with enough in-jokes to keep anyone snickering for a long time — especially English Lit geeks.” The Seattle Times

“Quirky and surprising and funny. Thursday fans will welcome her return.”
The Free Lance–Star

Meet the Author

Jasper Fforde traded a varied career in the film industry for staring vacantly out of the window and arranging words on a page. He lives and writes in Wales. The Eyre Affair was his first novel in the bestselling series of Thursday Next novels, which includes Lost in a Good Book, The Well of Lost Plots, Something Rotten, First Among Sequels, One of Our Thursdays is Missing, and The Woman Who Died A Lot. The series has more than one million copies (and counting) in print. He is also the author of The Big Over Easy and The Fourth Bear of the Nursery Crime series, Shades of Grey, and books for young readers, including The Last Dragonslayer. Visit jasperfforde.com.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Brecon, Powys, Wales, United Kingdom
Date of Birth:
January 11, 1961
Place of Birth:
London, United Kingdom
Education:
Left school at 18

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One of Our Thursdays Is Missing (Thursday Next Series #6) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 79 reviews.
cloggiedownunder More than 1 year ago
One Of Our Thursdays Is Missing is the sixth novel in the popular Thursday Next series by Welsh author, Jasper Fforde. Not long after the Remake of BookWorld, it seems that Real World Thursday Next is missing. Written Thursday (Thursday 1-4 from First Among Sequels, the huggy one) has been trying to play Thursday with dignity, but the series is virtually unread, so the presence of an understudy allows her to investigate with the help of Sprocket, a clockwork butler she has acquired (everyone needs a butler). This instalment features Men in Plaid as enforcers, a Triumph Bonneville, inter-genre cabs, a book sabotaged by rhetorical worms, a geologist thrown from a window, and a car chase. Written Thursday travels to the Real World, meets the real Landen, is kidnapped by a Wiltshire Stiltonista, tries to interpret obscure clues to Thursday’s whereabouts, travels up the Metaphoric River, meets some Loser Literary Siblings (The Mediocre Gatsby, Brian Heep, Tracy Capulet, Sharon Eyre etc) and is finally offered a job with Jurisfiction. Concepts like character assassins, a mime field, the Large Metaphor Collider and the intricacies of a character’s backstory are also a source of entertainment. Fforde still delights with some absurd names like Keitel Black, Red Herring and D.J. Growling, and each chapter is prefaced by a pertinent passage from Bradshaw’s BookWord Companion, which, we note, runs to at least fifteen editions, confirming that Colonel Bradshaw’s eventual retirement must have been profitable. As always, Fforde is incredibly clever: this is a brilliant read.
Little_Flyer_Speaks More than 1 year ago
It's been a long while since I read the preceding entry in this series (Thursday Next: First Among Sequels), and it took me awhile to settle back into the sort of crazed pace paying attention to apparently-silly-but-frequently-pivotal puns and points of reference, but IT ALL PAID OFF! Hang in there fans, all the bizarre loose ends were tied up and the take-offs on various genres were well worth the wait. Highly recommended!
snape_luver More than 1 year ago
This was a great step in the series, allowing readers to experience the world of Thursday Next from a new P.O.V.
Luv_to_read More than 1 year ago
I love reading Jasper Fforde's books especially the Thursday Next stories. Loved it. There is some very creative writing and his books inspire me to read more classics.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The first books in this series are very entertaining, the last one dropped to ok. This book is just, incredibly boring.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had forgotten how cool and original these books are. It took awhile for the story to get going, but I loved having to guess who is the real Thursday is. Can't wait to read the next one.
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I loved this book. I'm a huge fan of the series and i highly recommend all of Jasper's books. I first read The Eyre Affair in my comparative lit class and I couldn't put it down. After that I got all of Jasper's books. Jasper Fforde is one of my favorite authors.
Icaria More than 1 year ago
Even though I love Fforde's work, I was a bit reluctant to read this one because I didn't care for the synopsis. Once I finally settled in to read the work, I found that I loved the new direction the series was taking. The ending didn't go quite as far as I would have liked it to, but overall, it was still a great work.
joenglish More than 1 year ago
I have enjoyed every book that Fforde has written including this one. It was definitely worth reading, but not as original as the first couple books in his Thursday Next series. I think Fforde's brilliant "book world" can provide material for at least another one or two books, but this one felt more like a spin-off to me rather than a continuation of Thursday's original story.
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