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Oops
     

Oops

4.2 5
by Arthur Geisert
 

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Oops! One morning, while a pig family was sitting down to breakfast, a little milk spills to the floor. That shouldn’t be any problem at all! And it wouldn’t, except that the milk seeps through a crack in the floor and drips down to the workshop below onto a tray that tips and flips the switch on the grinder whose spinning wheel catches the loose end of a

Overview

Oops! One morning, while a pig family was sitting down to breakfast, a little milk spills to the floor. That shouldn’t be any problem at all! And it wouldn’t, except that the milk seeps through a crack in the floor and drips down to the workshop below onto a tray that tips and flips the switch on the grinder whose spinning wheel catches the loose end of a clothesline which gets wound around the leg of a table saw . . . and that is just the beginning of a series of chain reactions that lead from a little spill on the table to a giant boulder in the breakfast room! With each disastrous step depicted as only Arthur Geisert could, a seemingly ordinary incident spills out of control. They say you shouldn't cry over spilled milk, but what if it destroys your whole house?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Arthur Geisert's porcine characters cry over spilled milk in their latest adventure, Oops!-and with good reason. When one of the piglets spills his glass of milk, the liquid drains through the floor, setting off a chain of cataclysmic events, revealed once again with wordless precision in Geisert's meticulous pen-and-ink and watercolor wash drawings. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz
Geisert has his own special way with pigs, along with the ability to tell an engaging visual story with no words at all. This piggy tale begins in the family kitchen at the table as one of the children spills a glass of milk. Through a crack in the table it flows down toward the heat vent. On the next double page we can see from a more distant point of view a cutaway of the house on its site by the river with the family mopping up the milk on the table, while some of it is on its way through the heat vent to the basement workshop. The colored etchings which create the meticulously defined scenes and detailed vignettes delight us as they offer a sequence of ingenious evolving disasters. Machines are too close to electrical wires; tools are too ready to flick on switches; loosened machines are able to careen onto wagons and knock house supports out from under the surprised family; pipes are right on hand to spew powerful water gushes. Mayhem results, almost as if the family had deliberately engineered the cascading horrors. But through it all the family remains unscathed, still contentedly together at the end in their totally destroyed home. Their peaceful riverside home on the jacket/cover introduces the story.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 4-As a pig family gathers round a table at mealtime, one piglet spills his milk. This seemingly innocuous accident unleashes an unfortunate and elaborate chain of events in this wordless picture book. As the milk seeps through a vent, it drips into a paint tray in the workroom below, causing it to tip over and fall, knocking over some tools on its way to the floor. A few more steps down the chain and a table saw is unleashed, cutting its way through one of the main supports of the house. As the dwelling careens away from the terraced hillside onto which it is built, pipes burst, weakening the roots of the tree bearing the children's tree house. And on it goes. Despite the destruction, humorous touches in Geisert's characteristic colored etchings lighten the tragedy, and there is a happy ending. Children will enjoy poring over the detailed illustrations, figuring out how one thing leads to another, and noticing more and more upon repeated viewings. Although this family might well want to cry over spilt milk, they are intact and smiling at the end, standing together amid the wreckage of their home.-Robin L. Gibson, Granville Parent Cooperative Preschool, OH Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Geisert adds another link to his inventive, wordless chain-reaction escapades that are awash with cleverness and ingenuity. A family of five pigs is having breakfast in their house that sits cantilevered from a hill. A common mishap of a glass of spilled milk starts things rolling-literally. The milk runs through the table crack, down a drain into a paint tray, which bumps a screwdriver that turns on a buffing wheel that breaks a clothesline and wraps around a table saw, which tips over onto a wagon and turns on. The wagon rolls, the saw cuts the cornerpost of the house, causing it to tip, breaking the kitchen stovepipe that bursts a water pipe that uproots a tree. The momentum and mayhem culminate in a large rock careening downhill and crashing into the roof of the house. Whew! In the final scene, the pig family is standing together, amid the remains of the house, still smiling-somehow. More sophisticated, dark and subtle than Lights Out (2005); fans will delight in the frenetic action and maze of details in the etched illustrations and find relief in the fact that everyone is okay. (Picture book. 5-8)
From the Publisher

In the house of placid pigs, gravity is the big hero, because it makes the most things move. That's a great idea for a book.
The New York Times Book Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547529400
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
09/25/2006
Sold by:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
File size:
41 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Arthur Geisert's unique and exquisite etchings have been widely praised and exhibited at the Chicago Institute of Art, among other museums. His work is regularly selected for the Society of Illustrators', annual Original Art exhibition, and his illustrations are now being collected by the Dubuque Museum of Art. He lives in a converted bank in Bernard, Iowa.

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Oops 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Waits for Ian nervously
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He licked his licked and shoved his di.ck inside her.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Goldentail was here
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This looks adorable!