Porta Palazzo: The Anthropology of an Italian Market

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Overview

Porta Palazzo, arguably Western Europe's largest open-air market, is a central economic, social, and cultural hub for Italians and migrants in the city of Turin. Open-air markets like Porta Palazzo have existed for centuries in Europe; although their function has changed over time—traditional markets are no longer the primary place to buy food—they remain popular destinations. In an age of supermarkets and online commerce, markets offer unique social and cultural opportunities and bring together urban and rural ...

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Porta Palazzo: The Anthropology of an Italian Market

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Overview

Porta Palazzo, arguably Western Europe's largest open-air market, is a central economic, social, and cultural hub for Italians and migrants in the city of Turin. Open-air markets like Porta Palazzo have existed for centuries in Europe; although their function has changed over time—traditional markets are no longer the primary place to buy food—they remain popular destinations. In an age of supermarkets and online commerce, markets offer unique social and cultural opportunities and bring together urban and rural worldviews. These factors are often overlooked in traditional economic studies of food distribution, but anthropologist Rachel E. Black contends that social relations are essential for building and maintaining valuable links between production and consumption.

From the history of Porta Palazzo to the current growing pains of the market, this book concentrates on points where trade meets cultural identities and cuisine. Its detailed and perceptive portraits of the market bring into relief the lives of the vendors, shoppers, and passersby. Black's ethnography illuminates the daily work of market-going and the anxieties of shoppers as they navigate the market. It examines migration, the link between cuisine and cultural identity, culinary tourism, the connection between the farmers' market and the production of local food, and the urban planning issues negotiated by the city of Turin and market users during a recent renovation. This vibrant study, featuring a foreword by Slow Food Movement founder Carlo Petrini, makes a strong case for why markets like Porta Palazzo are critical for fostering culinary culture and social life in cities.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A robust, well-structured and argued book. [Rachel Black] provides us with a fresh, different slant on an urban space that, as she demonstrates, is far from being a place simply for buying and selling food."—Anthropology of Food

"A very readable and accessible ethnography of the Porta Palazzo open-air market in Turin, Italy."—Journal of Modern Italian Studies

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780812244069
  • Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/20/2012
  • Series: Contemporary Ethnography
  • Pages: 232
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Rachel E. Black teaches in the Gastronomy Program at Boston University. She is the editor of Alcohol in Popular Culture: An Encyclopaedia. Carlo Petrini is the founder of the Slow Food Movement and the University of Gastronomic Sciences in Pollenzo, Italy. His books include Slow Food Nation: Why Our Food Should Be Good, Clean, and Fair.
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Table of Contents

Foreword
—Carlo Petrini

Introduction: Going to Market
Chapter 1. The Market as a Field
Chapter 2. The Evolution of a Market
Chapter 3. A Neighborhood, a Square, and a Market
Chapter 4. Fare la spesa: Shopping, Morality, and Anxiety at the Market
Chapter 5. Il Ventre di Torino: Migration and Food
Chapter 6. Kumalé: Ethnogastronomic Tourism
Chapter 7. Nostrano: The Farmers' Market, Local Food, and Place
Conclusion: La Piazza—City, Public Space, and Sociability

Afterword: Porta Palazzo Market and Urban Renewal

Notes
Bibliography
Index
Acknowledgments

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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2014

    War torn secret diary

    I wish someone would yell at me say sucks to be u or sompthing but from trish its one word scentences and from alec its "its ok its ok" it makes me nad i dont want to be treated like a child i want to be treated like the MAN who beat up stanton the one who killed spike and the woman who killed alec and slapped trish and was treated like an adult not a toddler

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