Pro ASP.NET MVC Framework / Edition 1

Pro ASP.NET MVC Framework / Edition 1

5.0 1
by Steven Sanderson
     
 

ISBN-10: 1430210079

ISBN-13: 9781430210078

Pub. Date: 05/04/2009

Publisher: Apress

Steven Sanderson has seen the ASP.NET MVC framework mature from the start, so his experience, combined with comprehensive coverage of all its features, including those in the official MVC development toolkit, offers the clearest understanding of how this exciting framework could improve your coding efficiency—and you’ll gain invaluable

Overview

Steven Sanderson has seen the ASP.NET MVC framework mature from the start, so his experience, combined with comprehensive coverage of all its features, including those in the official MVC development toolkit, offers the clearest understanding of how this exciting framework could improve your coding efficiency—and you’ll gain invaluable awareness of security, deployment, and interoperability challenges.

The ASP.NET MVC Framework is the evolution of Microsoft’s ASP.NET web platform. It introduced a radical high–productivity programming model that promotes cleaner code architecture, test–driven development, and powerful extensibility, combined with all the benefits of ASP.NET 3.5.

An integral benefit of this book is that the core Model–View–Controller architectural concepts are not simply explained or discussed in isolation, but demonstrated in action. You’ll work through an extended tutorial to create a working e–commerce web application that combines ASP.NET MVC with the latest C# 3.0 language features and unit–testing best practices. By gaining this invaluable, practical experience, you can discover MVCs strengths and weaknesses for yourself—and put your best learned theory into practice.

What you’ll learn

  • Gain a solid architectural background to ASP.NET MVC, including Model–View–Controller and REST concepts.
  • Explore the ASP.NET MVC framework with detailed coverage of all aspects of the framework and the official MVC development toolkit.
  • See how it works with test–driven development in action.
  • Capitalize on your existing knowledge quickly and easily through translation and comparison of features in classic ASP.NET to those in ASP.NET MVC.
  • Learn about security and deployment issues, including IIS 7.0.


Who this book is for

This book is for web developers with a basic knowledge of ASP.NET and C# who want, or need, to start using the ASP.NET MVC framework.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781430210078
Publisher:
Apress
Publication date:
05/04/2009
Edition description:
1st ed. 2009. Corr. 3rd printing 2009
Pages:
550
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.20(h) x 1.40(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

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Pro ASP. NET MVC Framework 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
mxrss More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book very much, after a rather disappointing read of the Wrox "elongated head" book. This book restored my faith that MVC is the way to go. Sanderson is a very gifted author on presenting the case for DDD practices and within the first five chapters you see this. Because rather than build some kind of demo ware application that is only meant for "demoing" and is coded fast to try to keep the reader interested. The Author took a different approach, he focused on teaching skills that many programmers should be seeking. Writing well architected maintainable and testable code. He did not just throw a whole bunch of stuff together and said there that is what can be accomplished. He actually takes you step by step through the application. And what's so great is that he introduces methodology for "green horns" on how to use TDD with MVC. This is a big thing for a lot of programmer's out there, those that are really trying to make the leap from hobbyist developer to Enterprise Developer. The first five chapters alone are worth the price of this book. But what is so great that after he shows you what you can do (with unit tests in tow), he actually explains the how in great detail. He goes over even some common scenarios, that you may need such as using some of the built in providers that came with the ASP.net stack except adapting them to use the MVC stack. Its humbling to read such a tome of information where you get the feeling that the author did more than rewrite the tenuous amounts of information that is already available on MSDN. I loved particularly how he at least provided a introduction to some Domain Driven Design Concepts (like Behavior Driven Design, Entities and Services). The only complaint I can think of, is that in some areas and this is not really any fault of the book's author is that it does not explore those areas. Because of the way author's ability to simplify new and complicated concepts, I really wish he would added more DDD primer scope to it. Because of the naiveté of the .net camp to finally get into proven development methods like DDD it is my hope that author's like Sanderson approach the concept of less on how to use the technology, but at least present a way to think in it. Tools are great, but without proper use on to properly wield the tool it becomes rather tiresome to hear these new "fangled" technologies and then trying to make the case to your decision makers become hard. If authors wrote more like Sanderson making these arguments for the technology would not be as difficult and would present a easier way to allow us to use a "useful" technology to get the job done because it would clearly demonstrate the use of the tool. Thinking back, what I also like versus the other MVC book I have read, he at least showed some type of best practices to use for validation and controller creation. Instead of copping out to use the designer he actually shows you how to use LINQ2SQL with the mappings, so that you're in control of your DAL. It's not a hodgepodge of 50 classes, but rather a creation of entities that make sense to your business case. It's one of those times where your Domain model is dictating the requirements of your database. Not the other way around. In regard to validation Sanderson the author of xVal (which I got to say its nice to only hear once about a product the author made and not be used as a audience to constantl