Pro Spring / Edition 1

Pro Spring / Edition 1

4.0 2
by Rob Harrop, Jan Machacek
     
 

ISBN-10: 1590594614

ISBN-13: 9781590594612

Pub. Date: 01/31/2005

Publisher: Apress

Spring—the open source Java–based framework—allows you to build lighter, better performing applications. Written by Spring insiders Rob Harrop and Jan Machacek, Pro Spring is the only book endorsed by Rod Johnson, founder of the Spring Framework. At over 800 pages, this is by far the most comprehensive book

Overview

Spring—the open source Java–based framework—allows you to build lighter, better performing applications. Written by Spring insiders Rob Harrop and Jan Machacek, Pro Spring is the only book endorsed by Rod Johnson, founder of the Spring Framework. At over 800 pages, this is by far the most comprehensive book available and thoroughly explores the power of Spring. You’ll learn Spring basics and core topics, as well as share the authors’ insights and real–world experience with remoting, mail integration, hibernate, and EJB.

From the foreword: “Rob's enthusiasm for Spring—and technology in general—is infectious. He has a wide range of industry experience and a refreshingly practical, common sense approach to applying it. All those qualities come out in this book. It’s evident on nearly every page that it reflects in–depth experience with Spring and J2EE as a whole. Rob is not only an author and open source developer—he is an application developer, like his readers. I firmly believe that the best writing on software development comes out of experience in the trenches, so this is my kind of book.

If you’re new to Spring, this book will help you understand its core concepts and the background in areas such as transaction management and O/R mapping that underpins them. If you’re already using Spring, you will learn about features you haven’t yet seen and hopefully, gain a deeper understanding of those features youre already using.”

—Rod Johnson, Founder of the Spring Framework

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590594612
Publisher:
Apress
Publication date:
01/31/2005
Edition description:
1st ed. 2005. Corr. 2nd printing 2005
Pages:
832
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.25(h) x 9.25(d)

Related Subjects

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book makes striking claims in favour of the new Spring framework. It is presented as revolving around what the authors term Dependancy Injection (DI). Which can be used in place of a Lookup approach, which makes a class by calling a Factory or container with a key that labels that class. Hopefully, the Lookup will return an instance of the class. The book points out that this common approach is possibly more complex than DI. The Lookup registry might be unavailable, or the key for that class might have changed. The DI can lead to shorter and simpler code, which might also be easier to test. The book goes on to show cases of how Spring can permit simpler JDBC writing, with less explicit exception handling. As you may know, standard JDBC usages often lead to ugly sections of try/catch statements littering your code. So the brevity offered by Spring might enable easier maintenance. Likewise, Spring is said to give an easier alternative to a heavyweight EJB usage, in terms of less code to maintain. But the authors do indulge in some overblown rhetoric. Like calling a Factory and Singleton 'false patterns'. Certainly, for Singletons, there are times when it is natural in your code for a class to really have only one instantiation at a time, which is the gist of a Singleton. While Factory classes can encapsulate and hide a lot of complexity from you. While it means that, yes, if a Factory call fails, the reason can be obscure. But when it works, which should be most of the time, you have a nice partitioning of your code. The authors are overreaching, and adversely impacting the strength of their arguments.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'll keep this short by saying, if you want to learn the Spring framework, this is the book for you. The other book 'Spring in Action' is also well done. But this one is much more in-depth.