Real Food: What to Eat and Why

( 19 )

Overview

Hailed as the "patron saint of farmers' markets" by the Guardian and called one of the "great food activists" by Vanity Fair's David Kamp, Nina Planck is single-handedly changing the way we view "real food." A vital and original contribution to the hot debate about what to eat and why, Real Food is a thoroughly researched rebuttal to dietary fads and a clarion call for the return to old-fashioned foods.

In lively, personal chapters on produce, dairy, meat, fish, chocolate, and ...

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Overview

Hailed as the "patron saint of farmers' markets" by the Guardian and called one of the "great food activists" by Vanity Fair's David Kamp, Nina Planck is single-handedly changing the way we view "real food." A vital and original contribution to the hot debate about what to eat and why, Real Food is a thoroughly researched rebuttal to dietary fads and a clarion call for the return to old-fashioned foods.

In lively, personal chapters on produce, dairy, meat, fish, chocolate, and other real foods, Nina explains how ancient foods like beef and butter have been falsely accused, while industrial foods like corn syrup and soybean oil have created a triple epidemic of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. The New York Times said that Real Food "poses a convincing alternative to the prevailing dietary guidelines, even those treated as gospel," and that "radical" as Nina's ideas may be, the case she makes for them is "eminently sensible."

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for Real Food:

“Nina Planck’s powerful concept, ‘real food,’ has changed how we think about what we eat. Now Nina turns to the nutritional needs of the developing human being. Today, one can say that ‘womb ecology’ is the most vital aspect of human ecology. In terms of public health, nothing is more important than the health and well-being of pregnant women. That’s why no task is more important than to study the factors—particularly nutritional factors—that influence a baby’s growth and development.”—Dr. Michel Odent, author of The Farmer and the Obstetrician

“Nina Planck’s personal story of life with baby Julian, from preconception to tending the first tomatoes at their own Small Farm, makes compelling reading. Her no-nonsense, tell-it-like-it-is voice cuts through cant and euphemism like a whiff of sharp cheddar for anyone who wants the real dope. Her basic distinction between real and fake foods makes essential reading not just for mothers with babies, but for all of us who want to live and eat well.”—Betty Fussell, author of The Story of Corn, Raising Steaks, and My Kitchen Wars

“Nina’s real food concept is critical for new parents and her advice on introducing solids is the best no-nonsense, eliminate-the-power-struggle option I’ve read in years.”—Erica Lyon, author of The Big Book of Birth and founder of Realbirth

“How can you not be interested in Nina Planck's book?” —Jesse Kornbluth, HeadButler.com

“[Planck] is a cross between Alice Waters and Martha Stewart.”—Washington Post

“Science is finally catching up to what our grandmothers knew long ago: that traditional foods, and even fats, are actually good for you—and a whole lot healthier than the creations of food technology. Drawing on the latest research and oldest folk wisdom, Real Food offers a persuasive and invigorating defense of eggs, butter, meat, and even lard (!), as well as a powerful critique of a food industry that aims to replace these standbys with its highly processed, and sometimes deadly, simulacra. Nina Planck has written a valuable and eye-opening book.”Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma

“Planck has written an important book, and her timing may be perfect. With any luck, Real Food will resonate with Americans (starved for so long on low-fat diets) and bring Weston Price to a much larger audience than he could ever have imagined.”Los Angeles Times Book Review

Publishers Weekly
Nina Planck is a good, stylish writer and a dogged researcher who writes directly, forthrightly and with an edge. She isn't afraid to make the occasional wisecrack ("No doubt, for some people, cracking open an egg is one chore too many") while taking unpopular positions. Her chosen field-she is a champion of "real" (as opposed to industrialized) food-is one in which unpopular positions are easy to find. As Planck reveals, in her compellingly smart Real Food: What to Eat and Why, much of what we have learned about nutrition in the past generation or so is either misinformed or dead wrong, and almost all of the food invented in the last century, and especially since the Second World War, is worse than almost all of the food that we've been eating since we developed agriculture. This means, she says, that butter is better than margarine (so, for that matter, is lard); that whole eggs (especially those laid by hens who scratch around in the dirt) are better than egg whites, and that eggs in general are an integral part of a sound diet; that full-fat milk is preferable to skim, raw preferable to pasteurized, au naturel preferable to homogenized. She goes so far as to maintain-horror of horrors-that chopped liver mixed with real schmaltz and hard-boiled eggs is, in a very real way, a form of health food. Like those who've paved the way before her, she urges us to eat in a natural, old-fashioned way. But unlike many of them, and unlike her sometimes overbearing compatriots in the Slow Food movement, she is far from dogmatic, making her case casually, gently, persuasively. And personally, Planck's philosophy grows directly out of her life history, which included a pair of well-educated parents who decided, when the author was two, to pull up stakes in Buffalo, N.Y., and take up farming in northern Virginia. Planck, therefore, grew up among that odd combination of rural farming intellectuals who not only wanted to raise food for a living but could explain why it made sense. Planck, who is now an author and a creator and manager of farmers' markets, has a message that can be-and is-summed up in straightforward and simple fashion in her first couple of chapters. She then goes on to build her case elaborately, citing both recent and venerable studies, concluding in the end that the only sensible path for eating, the one that maintains and even improves health, the one that maintains stable weight and avoids obesity, happens to be the one that we all crave: not modern food, but traditional food, and not industrial food, but real food. (June) Mark Bittman's latest book is The Best Recipes in the World (Broadway); he is also the author of How to Cook Everything (Wiley). Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781596913424
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publication date: 6/28/2007
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 113,625
  • Product dimensions: 8.24 (w) x 10.90 (h) x 0.93 (d)

Meet the Author

Nina Planck grew up in Virginia selling vegetables at farmers' markets and later created the first farmers' markets in London, England. In New York City, she ran the legendary Greenmarkets. Nina also wrote The Farmers' Market Cookbook and hosted a British television series on local food. Her latest company, Real Food, runs markets for traditional foods in American cities.

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Table of Contents

1 I grow up on real food, lose my way, and come home again 1
2 Real milk, butter, and cheese 39
3 Real meat 87
4 Real fish 122
5 Real fruit and vegetables 139
6 Real fats 163
7 Industrial fats 196
8 Other real foods 210
9 Beyond cholesterol 245
10 The omnivore's dilemma 269
Where to find real food 276
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 19 )
Rating Distribution

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(13)

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Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2008

    A reviewer

    I felt so validated by this book. I've always enjoyed what I used to call my guilty pleasures: butter, cheese, milk and spending lots of time walking thorough my local farmers market looking for the freshest and most seasonal items but after reading this, I'm not hiding anymore. She targets what I would call fake food and explains why 'real food' is really good for you. She may take criticism from the mega food processors but give me my real butter and the farmers market any day.

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 14, 2012

    Excellent! A must read for people who eat!

    Excellent primer on the right things to eat and why. Eye-opening explanations of how processed food came to be and how it ravages our bodies. A little long-winded on the personal history, but made up for by the well-researched details throughout. I recommend it to my patients (and friends, family, cooks) all the time and re-read it regularly!

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 14, 2012

    This is a GREAT book!! A must read if you want to know how the

    This is a GREAT book!! A must read if you want to know how the Industrial Revolution and beyond ruined our food and our bodies!! And how we still believe in debunked "so-called medical studies". And to "Anonymous" who posted on December 28, 2011 - this isn't a cookbook!! So that was a really dumb review.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2011

    This is not a good a good book

    It does not give you good recipes i recemend that you do not read this. I enjoy cooking and have several cookbooks but this one is not . Take your risks if you want to buy it but like i said earleir it is not a good cookbook.

    1 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 14, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Eye opening and great informative read!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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