The Runner's Rule Book: Everything a Runner Needs to Know--And Then Some

The Runner's Rule Book: Everything a Runner Needs to Know--And Then Some

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by Mark Remy, Editors of Runner's World
     
 

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Every sport has rules. Running is no exception. If you're curious, just visit the Web site of USA Track & Field, the sport's governing body, where you'll find detailed dictates on everything from disqualification to bib-number placement to the caliber of the starter's pistol.

But what about the everyday rules of running? The unspoken ones that pertain to

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Overview

Every sport has rules. Running is no exception. If you're curious, just visit the Web site of USA Track & Field, the sport's governing body, where you'll find detailed dictates on everything from disqualification to bib-number placement to the caliber of the starter's pistol.

But what about the everyday rules of running? The unspoken ones that pertain to the lingo, behavior, and etiquette that every seasoned runner seems to know and every newbie needs to learn? Veteran runner Mark Remy and the editors of Runner's World magazine provide answers to these very questions and many more in The Runner's Rule Book.

Inside you'll find:

Rule 1.18

LEARN, AND LOVE, THE FARMER'S BLOW

Farmer's Blow \ fär-m?rz blo \ n: a process by which one clears a nostril of mucus by pinching shut the opposing nostril and exhaling forcefully

[syn: Snot Rocket]

Rule 2.32

DO WHATEVER IT TAKES TO FINISH AHEAD OF A COSTUMED RUNNER

Because being outkicked by Elmo is too much to bear.

Rule 3.1

CALL THEM RUNNING SHOES

They aren't sneakers, or tennis shoes, or kicks, or trainers (sorry, Brits). They are running shoes. So call them that.

...and many, many more. With 100+ rules that cover the basics of running, racing, track etiquette, and apparel and gear, including hilarious running commentary on running culture, The Runner's Rule Book will be the reference guide you'll turn to again and again for answers to your burning running questions.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781605295800
Publisher:
Rodale Press, Inc.
Publication date:
10/13/2009
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
559,124
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.70(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Mark Remy lives, runs, and writes in eastern Pennsylvania, where he is the executive editor of RunnersWorld.com. He has run 15 marathons, including 5 Bostons, with a personal best time of 2:46. (Note: He ran that 2:46 in 1999; see Rule 1.51, page 54.)

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The Runner's Rule Book: Everything a Runner Needs to Know--and Then Some 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
jb70 More than 1 year ago
I picked this up because I was curious about what the rules might be, have I been inadvertently breaking any rules because I didn't know they existed? I live very close to the Rodale Institute where the editors at Runner's World work so when they talked about different routes they take I can picture some of the streets and such. So how am I doing and what rules do I break? I do sometimes throw my running clothes in the dryer, not the sports bras, but the pants and shirts. I guess I am making them not last as long, but in doing laundry for six people, two of whom run, I don't always remember to pull things out before they go through the dryer. I've never broken this one, but I don't know that I wouldn't, apparently you should not wear the t-shirt for a race in the actual race, it should only be worn afterwards. I understand not wearing a shirt for a race you've never done, but if you are doing the race right then I wouldn't see a problem with wearing the shirt and often see many people doing so. I've never run in Philadelphia, but where I run isn't that far away and I have never heard the Rocky theme song at any race I have done including the St. Luke's Half Marathon in Allentown in April which had a band at every mile marker. This was a nice, fast read, which elicited some smiles and a couple of laughs, pointed out some common sense like not running three runners abreast on a road for safety and courtesy.
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