The Death Ship by B. Traven, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
The Death Ship

The Death Ship

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by B. Traven
     
 

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The Death Ship tells the story of an American sailor, stateless and penniless because he has lost his passport, who is harassed by police and hounded across Europe until he finds an 'illegal' job shoveling coal in the hold of a steamer bound for destruction.

The Death Ship is the first of B. Traven's politically charged novels about life among the downtrodden,

Overview

The Death Ship tells the story of an American sailor, stateless and penniless because he has lost his passport, who is harassed by police and hounded across Europe until he finds an 'illegal' job shoveling coal in the hold of a steamer bound for destruction.

The Death Ship is the first of B. Traven's politically charged novels about life among the downtrodden, which have sold more than thirty million copies in thirty-six languages. Next to The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, it is his most celebrated work

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“The greatest of Traven's works, it is a good-humored but devastating attack on bureaucracy and the state.” —Los Angeles Times

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781556521102
Publisher:
Chicago Review Press, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/28/1991
Edition description:
Revised edition
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
500,266
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.80(d)

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The Death Ship 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Rode More than 1 year ago
This tale is divided into three sections or booklets. The first provides challenging characterization and setting; the second falls into a comfortable, philosophical story; while the third and shortest is some of the finest writing I've read. It is an emotional rollercoaster ride that leaves the reader exhausted but satisfied. Well written, and interesting still today, 70 years later. Forget Joseph Conrad; the horrors, detail, and description found in Traven are unequalled, and absolutely believable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is more relevant now than ever as we slide into the morass of red tape and bureaucracy. The Death Ship could have been written this year. This book is not an easy read. It is a gruelling, depressing look at reality. I love it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Well,this novel is a good description of social conditions of unherited people and poor workers of 1920 decade. But this said, the protagonist, which speaks in first person, Gerald Gale or ¿Pippip¿ and his mate Stanislav, are unlike to suffer too much even at that hard times¿ at less they were real trouble searchers. Pippip loses his American freighter in the port of Amberes while in company of a madame. From this and after a long and hard pilgrimage by depressed Europe, he must work in the Death Ship ¿the ¿Yorikke¿- the only one that doesn¿t demand passports or another papers because she deserves for firearms smuggle. But Gale and Stanislav behave and think as great philosophers and master several languages: English, Spanish, German ... Also they are superb sailors. For such two men, to obtain false documents I think must have been more easy than embark at these horrible ship. This book I think must be viewed over all as a bitter social critique than an adventures book.